Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Henry "Hotspur" Percy

Male 1364 - 1403  (39 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Henry "Hotspur" Percy was born on 20 May 1364 (son of Henry Percy and Margaret de Neville); died on 21 Jul 1403 in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: 30 May 1364

    Notes:

    The holder of many offices and titles, he was knighted by Edward III in April 1377 along with the future kings Richard II and Henry IV, who were almost exactly his age. Not long after the latter ascended the throne, Henry Percy went into open rebellion, and was slain at the battle of Shrewsbury. His body was buried at Whitchurch, Shropshire, but was disinterred two days later to be exhibited in Shrewsbury. The head was cut off and fixed onto one of the gates of York.

    Henry married Elizabeth Mortimer before 10 Dec 1379. Elizabeth (daughter of Edmund Mortimer and Philippe of Clarence) was born on 12 Feb 1371 in Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales; died on 20 Apr 1417. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. Elizabeth Percy died on 26 Oct 1436; was buried in Staindrop, Durham, England.
    2. Henry Percy was born on 3 Feb 1393; died on 22 May 1455 in St. Alban's, Hertfordshire, England; was buried in St. Albans Abbey, Hertfordshire, England.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Henry Percy was born on 10 Nov 1341 in of Warkworth, Northumberland, England (son of Henry de Percy and Mary of Lancaster); died on 19 Feb 1408 in Bramham Moor, near Tadcaster, Yorkshire, England; was buried in York Cathedral, York, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Earl of Northumberland. From Wikipedia:

    Henry Percy was originally a follower of Edward III of England, for whom he held high offices in the administration of northern England. At a young age he was made Warden of the Marches towards Scotland in 1362, with the authority to negotiate with the Scottish government. In February 1367 he was entrusted with the supervision of all castles and fortified places in the Scottish marches. He went on to support King Richard II and was created an Earl and briefly given the title of Marshal of England. Between 1383 and 1384 he was appointed Admiral of the Northern Seas. After Richard elevated his rival Ralph Neville to the position of Earl of Westmorland in 1397, Percy supported the rebellion of Henry Bolingbroke, who became King as Henry IV.

    On King Henry IV's coronation he was appointed Constable of England and granted the lordship of the Isle of Man. Percy and his son, Henry Percy, known as "Hotspur", were given the task of subduing the rebellion of Owain Glynd?r, but their attempts to make peace with the Welsh rebels did not meet with the king's approval.

    In 1403 the Percys turned against Henry IV in favour of Edmund Mortimer, 5th Earl of March, and then conspired with Owain Glynd?r against King Henry. The Tripartite Indenture was signed by all three parties, which divided England up between them. Glynd?r was to be given Wales, and a substantial part of the west of England, Northumberland was to have received the north of England, as well as Northamptonshire, Norfolk, Warwickshire, and Leicestershire. The Mortimers were to have received the rest of southern England, below the river Trent.

    The Percy rebellion failed at the Battle of Shrewsbury, where Hotspur was killed. Since the earl did not directly participate in the rebellion, he was not convicted of treason. However, he lost his office as Constable. In 1405 Percy supported Richard le Scrope, Archbishop of York, in another rebellion, after which Percy fled to Scotland, and his estates were confiscated by the king.

    In 1408 Percy invaded England in rebellion once more and was killed at the Battle of Bramham Moor. Percy's severed head was subsequently put on display at London Bridge.

    Henry married Margaret de Neville on 12 Jul 1358 in Brancepeth, Durham, England. Margaret (daughter of Ralph de Neville and Alice de Audley) died on 11 May 1372; was buried in North Allerton, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Margaret de Neville (daughter of Ralph de Neville and Alice de Audley); died on 11 May 1372; was buried in North Allerton, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 12 May 1372
    • Alternate death: 13 May 1372

    Children:
    1. 1. Henry "Hotspur" Percy was born on 20 May 1364; died on 21 Jul 1403 in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Henry de Percy was born between 1322 and 1325 in of Alnwick, Northumberland, England (son of Henry de Percy and Idoine de Clifford); died about 18 May 1368 in Warkworth, Northumberland, England; was buried in Alnwick Abbey, Northumberland, England.

    Notes:

    Keeper of Berwick Castle, joint Warden of the Marches, Sheriff of Roxburghshire. Fought at Crécy and was present at the siege of Calais.

    Henry married Mary of Lancaster before 5 Sep 1334. Mary (daughter of Henry of Lancaster and Maud de Chaworth) was born about 1320; died on 1 Sep 1362; was buried in Alnwick Abbey, Northumberland, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  Mary of Lancaster was born about 1320 (daughter of Henry of Lancaster and Maud de Chaworth); died on 1 Sep 1362; was buried in Alnwick Abbey, Northumberland, England.
    Children:
    1. 2. Henry Percy was born on 10 Nov 1341 in of Warkworth, Northumberland, England; died on 19 Feb 1408 in Bramham Moor, near Tadcaster, Yorkshire, England; was buried in York Cathedral, York, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 6.  Ralph de Neville was born about 1291 in of Raby, Durham, England (son of Ranulph de Neville and Euphemia de Clavering); died on 5 Aug 1367; was buried in Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durham, England.

    Notes:

    "Ralph (de Neville), Lord Neville, 2nd but 1st surviving son, was aged 40 and more at his father's death. He was taken prisoner with his younger brothers at Berwick in 1319. He had begun his long career of public service and official work already in 1322, when he was constable of Warkworth Castle, and serving in the Marches under the Earl of Carlisle. In 1324 he was appointed with the Earl of Angus to escort the envoys of Robert Bruce to York, to treat of peace, and in 1325 commissioner to keep the truce in Northumberland. At the time of his father's death he was already steward of the King's household. In the following January he indented to serve Sir Henry Percy, and in July was commissioned to take over the keepership of the Forest beyond Trent. He was present at the surrender of Berwick Castle to Edward III, July 1333, and again with the King in Scotland in 1334 (June-October) and in the summer of 1335; joint commissioner, 1333 and 1334, to Edward Baliol's Parliament, to demand confirmation of covenants, and in 1334 Warden of the Scottish Marches, some time sole and some time with Percy; in the same year chief of the justices in eyre of the Forest (Notts and Yorks) for that turn; in 1335 he was made keeper of Bamburgh Castle for life, and by Mar. 1336/7 was a banneret. In July 1338 and June 1340 he was appointed on the Council of Prince Edward as Keeper of the Realm, and (by the Bishop) overseer of the keepers of the temporalities of the see of Durham during his absence on the King's service. He commanded the first division at the victory of Durham, or Nevill's Cross, 17 October 1346, where King David of Scotland was taken prisoner; and took part in the naval success against the Spaniards off Winchelsea, 29 Aug. 1350." [Complete Peerage]

    Unmentioned by CP, but he was educated at Oxford. He was the first layman to be buried at Durham Cathedral, in recognition of his role in the victory at Nevill's Cross.

    Ralph married Alice de Audley after 14 Jan 1327. Alice (daughter of Hugh de Audley and Isolde le Rous) was born about 1300; died on 12 Jan 1374 in Greystoke, Northumberland, England; was buried in Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durham, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 7.  Alice de Audley was born about 1300 (daughter of Hugh de Audley and Isolde le Rous); died on 12 Jan 1374 in Greystoke, Northumberland, England; was buried in Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durham, England.
    Children:
    1. 3. Margaret de Neville died on 11 May 1372; was buried in North Allerton, Yorkshire, England.
    2. John de Neville was born about 1330; died on 17 Oct 1388 in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland, England; was buried in Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durham, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Henry de Percy was born in 1299 (son of Henry de Percy and Eleanor de Arundel); died on 26 Feb 1352 in Warkworth, Northumberland, England; was buried in Alnwick, Northumberland, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: 2 Feb 1300, Leconfield, Yorkshire, England
    • Alternate birth: 6 Feb 1301, Leconfield, Yorkshire, England
    • Alternate death: 27 Feb 1352, Warkworth, Northumberland, England

    Notes:

    Keeper of Berwick Castle; Keeper of the Coast of Yorkshire and Northumberland; Keeper of Bamburgh and Skipton Castles; Warden of the Scottish Marches; Justiciar of the East March.

    M.P. 1322-52, according to Ancestral Roots.

    Great-grandfather of Henry "Hotspur" Percy.

    "A powerful border lord, he was a justiciar and warden of the Scottish marches, participated frequently in raids, skirmishes, battles and sieges against the Scots, including the battle of Neville's Cross, where he commanded a division." [The Ancestry of Charles II]

    Henry married Idoine de Clifford about 1318. Idoine (daughter of Robert de Clifford and Maud de Clare) was born in in of Appleby, Westmorland, England; died on 24 Aug 1365; was buried in Beverley Minster, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  Idoine de Clifford was born in in of Appleby, Westmorland, England (daughter of Robert de Clifford and Maud de Clare); died on 24 Aug 1365; was buried in Beverley Minster, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Abt 1303, Clifford Castle, Herefordshire, England

    Notes:

    Newsgroups: soc.genealogy.medieval
    Date: Thu, 25 Dec 2014 11:11:50 -0800 (PST)
    Subject: Re: Looking for primary source documents on Idonia [Imania] de Clifford
    Reply-To: Douglas Richardson

    Dear Steve ~

    The correct name of Henry de Percy's wife is Idoine de Clifford. "Idonia" or "Idonea" are the Latin forms of her name and should be avoided.

    The parentage of Idoine de Clifford is hardly elusive as you imagine. There are no less than five separate visitations/medieval sources which name Idoine, wife of Sir Henry de Percy, as a Clifford, or the daughter of Lord Clifford:

    1. Archaeologia Aeliana 3 (1844): 40 (Chronicles of Alnwick Abbey: "Iste Henricus disponsavit idoneam filiam Domini de Clyfford et genuit ex ea Anno Domini 1320 Henricum quartum et tertium Dominum de Alnewyk et alios plures filios et filias inter quos erat Thomas qui postea fuit Episcopus Norwicens ...").

    2. Atkinson, Cartularium Abbathiæ de Whiteby 2 (Surtees Soc. 72) (1881): 690-696 (Percy ped.: "The fourth Henry Lord Percy ... gat on Idonea Clyfford Henry, William, Richard, Maude, Alianour Fitzwater, Roger, and Margarett that was maried to the Erle of Angus Sonne and his heire.").

    3. Flower, Vis. of Yorkshire 1563-4 (H.S.P. 16) (1881): 241-244 (Percy ped.: "Henry 4 Lord Percy. = Ida doughter of the Lord Clyfford.").

    This item is available online at the following weblink:

    books.google.com/books?id=pjMEAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA242

    4. Harvey et al., Vis. of the North 3 (Surtees Soc. 144) (1930): 18-20 (Percy ped.: "Henricus Percy = Idonea Clifforde").

    This item is available online at the following weblink:

    www.uiowa.edu/~c030149a/northern/surtees144text.pdf

    5. Harvey et al., Vis. of the North 4 (Surtees Soc. 146) (1932): 17-24 (Lassels ped.: "Idonæ [Clifford] mar: to Henry lord Percy").

    This item is available online at the following weblink:

    www.uiowa.edu/~c030149a/northern/surtees146text.pdf

    Given that we know that Sir Henry Percy was born in 1300 or 1301, and given that Henry's son and heir, also named Henry, was born about
    1322-5, the birth of Idoine de Clifford would necessarily have to fall about 1300-1310. Given the chronology, Idoine de Clifford can be placed as a daughter of Robert de Clifford (died 1314), 1st Lord Clifford, and his wife, Maud de Clare, which Robert and Maud were married in 1295. Idoine de Clifford was surely named for her father's maternal aunt, Idoine de Vipont (died 1333), wife of Roger de Leybourne, Knt., and John de Cromwell, Knt., Lord Cromwell.

    For interesting references to Idoine, wife of Sir Henry de Percy, see the following weblinks:

    books.google.com/books?id=1MUwhOPhfKcC&pg=PA116&dq=Idoine+Percy

    books.google.com/books?lr=&id=8AMhAAAAMAAJ&dq=Idoine+Percy&q=Idoine&pgis=1#search_anchor

    books.google.com/books?id=RzUdAAAAIAAJ&q=Idoine+Percy&dq=Idoine+Percy&lr=&pgis=1

    books.google.com/books?id=cu8i2yausLcC&pg=PA124&dq=Idoine+Percy&lr=

    The tomb at Beverley Minster, Yorkshire which is now attributed to Idoine de Clifford, wife of Sir Henry de Percy, bears shields with various coats of arms, among them Clifford.

    Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah

    On Wednesday, December 24, 2014 1:15:21 AM UTC-7, The Hoorn wrote:

    So far, I have been unsuccessful in locating any primary or contemporaneous records, documenting the parentage of Idonia [Imania] de Clifford, as the daughter of Lord Robert Clifford (killed in battle Bannockburn 24 Jun 1314) and Matilda de Clare. Idonia was also the wife of Sir Henry Percy (1301-1352).

    I would sincerely welcome any assistance.

    Thanks!

    Children:
    1. Isabel Percy died between 13 Sep 1349 and 25 May 1368.
    2. Eleanor de Percy died before 18 Oct 1361; was buried in Dunmow Priory, Little Dunmow, Essex, England.
    3. 4. Henry de Percy was born between 1322 and 1325 in of Alnwick, Northumberland, England; died about 18 May 1368 in Warkworth, Northumberland, England; was buried in Alnwick Abbey, Northumberland, England.
    4. Maud Percy was born about 1345 in Alnwick, Northumberland, England; died before 18 Feb 1379; was buried in Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durham, England.

  3. 10.  Henry of Lancaster was born about 1280 (son of Edmund "Crouchback" and Blanche of Artois); died on 22 Sep 1345; was buried in The Newarke, Leicester Castle, Leicester, Leicestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Abt 1281, Grosmont Castle, Monmouthshire, Wales

    Notes:

    Also called "Tortcol"; also called Henry Plantagenet.

    Earl of Lancaster. Earl of Leicester.

    Steward of England; Constable of Abergavenny and Kenilworth Castles 1326; Chief Guardian of the King 1327; Captain-General of the Marches towards Scotland 1327; Councillor of Regency 1345.

    Summoned to Parliament by writs 6 Feb 1299 onward.

    "Served against the Scots and in Flanders, at the siege of Carlaverock in 1300, among the barons forcing restrictions on Edward II's powers, joined the queen's party in 1326 and captured the king later that year, knighted Edward III at his coronation, became blind in about 1330, but continued to participate in public affairs and as a counselor of the king." [Ancestry of Charles II, citation details below.]

    Henry of Lancaster and Maud de Chaworth were great-grandparents of both Henry IV and his queen, Mary de Bohun.

    Henry married Maud de Chaworth before 2 Mar 1297. Maud (daughter of Patrick de Chaworth and Isabel de Beauchamp) was born on 2 Feb 1282; died before 3 Dec 1322; was buried in Mottisfont Priory, Hampshire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 11.  Maud de Chaworth was born on 2 Feb 1282 (daughter of Patrick de Chaworth and Isabel de Beauchamp); died before 3 Dec 1322; was buried in Mottisfont Priory, Hampshire, England.

    Notes:

    Also called Maud de Chaorces.

    Children:
    1. Maud of Lancaster died on 5 May 1377.
    2. Joan of Lancaster was born about 1312; died after 1345; was buried in Byland, Yorkshire, England.
    3. Henry of Grosmont was born in 1314; died on 23 Mar 1361.
    4. Eleanor of Lancaster was born about 1318; died on 11 Jan 1372 in Arundel, Sussex, England; was buried in Lewes Priory, Sussex, England.
    5. 5. Mary of Lancaster was born about 1320; died on 1 Sep 1362; was buried in Alnwick Abbey, Northumberland, England.

  5. 12.  Ranulph de Neville was born on 18 Oct 1262 in of Raby, Durham, England (son of Robert de Neville and Mary fitz Ranulph); died after 18 Apr 1331; was buried in Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 18 Apr 1331

    Notes:

    "Randolf or Ranulph (sometimes called, seemingly in error, Ralph, son and heir of Robert de Neville and Mary his wife, was born 18 October 1262, and was heir to the Neville estates on the death of his grandfather, in 1282 (having livery under writ of 11 January 1283/4), and to his mother's inheritance, April 1320. He was summoned, 15 July 1287, with horses and arms to a military council at Gloucester (before Edmund, Earl of Cornwall, in the King's absence abroad), and to attend the King at Westminster, June 1294. He was summoned to Parliament from 24 June 1295 to 18 February 1330/1, by writs directed Ranulpho (and Radulpho) de Neville, whereby he is held to have become Lord Neville. For service in Scotland he was summoned 1291 and in later years; for service in Gascony, 1294, 1297 and 1324; and against the rebels under the Earl of Lancaster, 1322. His seal, as Dominus de Raby, was attached to the letter of the Barons to the Pope, February 1300/1. In 1303 he was chief of the delegates summoned by the King to set forth the grievances of the people against the Bishop of Durham. He, or possibly his son Ralph, was commissioner of array in Durham, 1322, in the North Riding of Yorks, 1324, and in Northumberland, 1324 and 1326; in 1325 Keeper of the Peace and one of the specially appointed keepers of the coast in Northumberland, and in 1326 one of the commissioners to impress shipping in the ports of that county. He m., 1stly, Eupheme, daughter of Robert Fitzroger, Lord Fitzroger (see Clavering), and, 2ndly, Margery, dau. of John de Thweng, by whom he had no issue. He died shortly after 18 April 1331." [Complete Peerage IX:497-8.]

    Dugdale says of him that "It is reported of this Ranulph, that he little minded Secular business; but, for the most part, betook himself to conversation with the Canons of Merton and Coverham; as also, that he committed Incest with his own Daughter, and that Richard de Kellaw, Bishop of Durham, did for that crime compel him to do publick pennance." According to footnote (b) of the CP account quoted previously, this took place in 1313.

    A slightly different version of the incest story is found in the 1875 Preface to Volume III of The Register of Richard de Kellawe, Lord Palatine and Bishop of Durham, 1314-1316, by the volume's editor, Sir Thomas Duffus Hardy. Hardy devotes nearly a page to the conviction and punishment of Ranulph's daughter Anastasia for her adultery with John de Lilleford, dwelling at length on how "proving contumacious, sentence of the Greater Excommunication was pronounced against her." This sentence was subquently commuted by the bishop and replaced with six weeks of elaborate public penance. But "[t]his unhappy woman's troubles seem not to have ended even with this promulgation of her shame and disgrace. On the 9th of November following, a mandate was issued by the bishop for the condemnation of Sur Ranulph de Neville, knight, who had been 'judicially convicted of the crime of incest and adultery with the said Anastasia, his daughter, and wife of Sir Walter de Fauconberg;' to appear in the parish church of Aukland, on the Monday after the feast of St. Andrew the Apostle, there to receive penance for the said crime and for the further offence of contumacy. Sir Ranulph failing to appear, on the 16th of the following month, a mandate was issued, directing him to be excommunicated, in the Galilee at Durham, and all parish churches within the archdeaconry of Durham. We have no further details of this lamentable story. Sir Ranulph de Nevill, of Raby, was a baron of Parliament by writ, succeeded his grandfather Robert, in 1282, and died in 1331. It is only just to add, that Sir Ranulph seems habitually to have been in disfavour with the church; as for other, and apparently, trivial offenses, he had been pronounced excommunicated in the month of August before; but on the Tuesday after Michaelmas day had been absolved. On the 13th of October following, we find him again cited, 'for certain crimes and excesses which he has confessed,' to appear before the bishop or his commissaries, in the Galilee at Durham. In this instance, the nature of his offenses is not named."

    There certainly seems to have been no love lost between the Neville family and the Durham ecclesiastical establishment. Dugdale reports that shortly after Ranulph assumed his inheritance in 1282, he had a feud with the prior of Durham over the terms of a customary presentation of a stag to the priory on St. Cuthbert's Day. And we see from his CP entry that in 1303 "Ranulph was chief of the delegates summoned by the King to set forth the grievances of the people against the Bishop of Durham." The incest case happened in 1313. In 1318, Ranulph's eldest son Robert attacked and killed Richard Marmaduke, seneschal to the bishop, on the Old Bridge of Durham. All of which suggests a cycle of offense and reprisal. (Later in the same year, Robert was killed by James, earl of Douglas, in single combat to which Robert had dared the earl.)

    It should also be noted that Dugdale's characterization of Ranulph as "little minding Secular business" accords oddly with the eventful life of military and civilian service set forth by Complete Peerage. And yet this characterization appears elsewhere. T. F. Bulmer's 1890 History and Directory of Old Yorkshire states that this Ranulph "was so indolent and careless in the management of his affairs, that his mother settled Middleham and the rest of her manors on her grandson, Robert Neville". One wonders if we aren't simply picking through the tattered leavings of a 700-years-gone propaganda war.

    Ranulph married Euphemia de Clavering before 12 Mar 1281. Euphemia (daughter of Robert fitz Roger and Margaret la Zouche) was born after 1265; died about 1320; was buried in Staindrop, Durham, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  6. 13.  Euphemia de Clavering was born after 1265 (daughter of Robert fitz Roger and Margaret la Zouche); died about 1320; was buried in Staindrop, Durham, England.
    Children:
    1. 6. Ralph de Neville was born about 1291 in of Raby, Durham, England; died on 5 Aug 1367; was buried in Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durham, England.

  7. 14.  Hugh de Audley was born about 1267 in of Stratton, Stratton Audley, Oxfordshire, England (son of James de Aldithley and Ela Longespée); died between 1325 and 1326.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 1 Apr 1325, Wallingford Castle, Oxfordshire, England
    • Alternate death: Bef 12 Apr 1326

    Notes:

    Summoned to Parliament by writ, 1321. Joined the rebellion of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster in 1322, but surrendered before the battle of Boroughbridge. Died while a prisoner in Wallingford Castle.

    "Hugh Audley, of Stratton Audley, Oxon, yst. s. of James Audley or Aldithley, of Heleigh, co. Stafford by Ela, da. of William Longespée (s. and h. ap. of Ela, suo jure Countess of Salisbury); was b. c. 1267, and obtained from his mother, soon after her husband's death, a reversionary grant, (1272-73) 1 Edw. I, of Stratton Audley, afsd., which had been her inheritance. He was in the French wars, 1294, &c.; a prisoner in France 2 Apr. 1299; in the Scottish wars, 1299-1302, and again 1313; he was in Gascony in 1304/5; Justice of North Wales 1306; and was Governor of Montgomery Castle, 1309. He was sum. to Parl. 15 May (1321) 14 Edw. II, the writ being directed Hugoni de Audele seniori, to distinguish him from his 2nd s., Hugh Audley, Junior, who had been so sum. in 1317. In 1321/2 he joined the insurrection of the Earl of Lancaster, but surrendered before the battle of Boroughbridge, 16 Mar. 1321/2, and was confined in Wallingford Castle. He m., before 7 Jan. 1293, and probably in 1288, Isolt, widow of Sir Walter de Balun, of Much Marcle, co. Hereford (who was living and m. to her in 1286/7), da. of Sir Edmund de Mortimer, 1st Lord Mortimer, of Wigmore, co. Hereford, by (____). She brought him the manors of Eastington, co. Gloucester, and of Thornbury, Co. Hereford. He d. between Nov. 1325, and Mar. 1325/6, probably while still a prisoner. No trace can be found of the pardon which he is sometimes said to have received, and any peerage which he may be held to have possessed, may be treated as having been forfeited by attainder. His widow was living 1336." [Complete Peerage I:347-48, as corrected in Volume XIV. See the entry on his wife for doubt she was was a daughter of Edmund de Mortimer.]

    Hugh married Isolde le Rous before Jul 1291. Isolde (daughter of Roger le Rous and Eleanor de Avenbury) died before 4 Aug 1338. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  8. 15.  Isolde le Rous (daughter of Roger le Rous and Eleanor de Avenbury); died before 4 Aug 1338.

    Notes:

    Complete Peerage and Ancestral Roots give her as a daughter of Sir Edmund Mortimer, 7th Baron Mortimer of Wigmore, by an unidentified first wife, but various discussions on SGM and elsewere led to a consensus that this is chronologically improbable and that her parentage must be regarded as unknown. See also this page on Chris Phillips' site.

    More recently, on 17 Dec 2017, Douglas Richardson posted to SGM evidence that she was a daughter of Roger le Rous and his wife Eleanor de Avenbury. Both pieces of evidence have to do with the known fact that her first husband was Walter de Balun, who died in 1287. In 1296 one Isolde sued Reynold de Balun in the Court of Common Pleas regarding the manor of Eastington, Gloucester, which she claimed as her right and which she was in fact holding at that time. Reynold de Balun was Walter de Balun's brother and heir. The record identifies Isolde, the plaintiff, as "daughter of Roger le Rus." The other document is a record of Walter de Balun and his wife, Isolde, being enfeoffed with the manor of Much Marcle, Herefordshire by Roger le Rous. Between these two it seems clear that the wife of Hugh de Audley, widow of Walter de Balun, was a daughter of Roger le Rous.

    Complete Peerage and Ancestral Roots give her as a daughter of Sir Edmund Mortimer, 7th Baron Mortimer of Wigmore, by an unidentified first wife, but various discussions on SGM and elsewere led to a consensus that this is chronologically improbable and that her parentage must be regarded as unknown. See also this page on Chris Phillips' site.

    More recently, on 17 Dec 2017, Douglas Richardson posted to SGM evidence that she was a daughter of Roger le Rous and his wife Eleanor de Avenbury. Both pieces of evidence have to do with the known fact that her first husband was Walter de Balun, who died in 1287. In 1296 one Isolde sued Reynold de Balun in the Court of Common Pleas regarding the manor of Eastington, Gloucester, which she claimed as her right and which she was in fact holding at that time. Reynold de Balun was Walter de Balun's nephew and heir. The record identifies Isolde, the plaintiff, as "daughter of Roger le Rus." The other document is a record of Walter de Balun and his wife, Isolde, being enfeoffed with the manor of Much Marcle, Herefordshire by Roger le Rous. Between these two it seems clear that the wife of Hugh de Audley, widow of Walter de Balun, was a daughter of Roger le Rous.

    Children:
    1. Hugh de Audley was born in in of Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England; died on 10 Nov 1347; was buried in Tonbridge Priory, Kent, England.
    2. 7. Alice de Audley was born about 1300; died on 12 Jan 1374 in Greystoke, Northumberland, England; was buried in Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durham, England.