Nielsen Hayden genealogy

William Homes

Male 1717 - 1785  (68 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  William Homes was born on 10 Jan 1717 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts (son of Capt. Robert Homes and Mary Franklin); died on 21 Jul 1785 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts; was buried in Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: 10 Jan 1716, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts
    • Baptised: 13 Jan 1717, Old North Church, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts

    Notes:

    Baptized by Dr. Increase Mather. He was a gold and silver smith.

    William married Rebecca Dawes on 24 Apr 1740 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts. Rebecca (daughter of Thomas Dawes and Sarah Story) was born on 9 Mar 1718 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts; died in Jul 1786 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts; was buried in Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Sarah Holmes was born on 2 Jan 1748 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts; died on 21 Mar 1826 in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts; was buried in Bridge Street Cemetery, Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Capt. Robert Homes was born on 23 Jul 1694 in Stragolan, Fermanagh, Ireland (son of Rev. William Homes and Katherine Craighead); died in 1743 in Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts.

    Other Events:

    • Baptised: 25 Jul 1694

    Capt. married Mary Franklin on 3 Apr 1716 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts. Mary (daughter of Josiah Franklin and Abiah Folger) was born on 26 Sep 1695 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts; died about 1731 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Mary Franklin was born on 26 Sep 1695 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts (daughter of Josiah Franklin and Abiah Folger); died about 1731 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: 26 Sep 1694
    • Baptised: 30 Sep 1695, Old South Church, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts

    Notes:

    Sister of Benjamin Franklin.

    Children:
    1. 1. William Homes was born on 10 Jan 1717 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts; died on 21 Jul 1785 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts; was buried in Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Rev. William Homes was born about 1663 in Donoughmore, Donegal, Ireland (son of John Homes); died on 20 Jun 1746 in Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts.

    Notes:

    From a display at the Irish Emigration Museum in Dublin, Ireland:

    "Donegal-born Holmes settled as the minister in Chilmark, Massachusetts. He published books and his diary is a valuable source of local historical information. Holmes's son Robert was a sea captain, and through him Holmes encouraged hundreds of Ulster-Scots to emigrate to America. In 1716, Robert Holmes married Benjamin Franklin's sister Mary."

    Rev. married Katherine Craighead on 26 Sep 1693 in Londonderry, Londonderry, Ireland. Katherine (daughter of Rev. Robert Craighead and Agnes Heart) was born about 1672; died on 10 Apr 1754 in Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Katherine Craighead was born about 1672 (daughter of Rev. Robert Craighead and Agnes Heart); died on 10 Apr 1754 in Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts.

    Notes:

    One of TWK's eleven "gateway ancestors."

    Children:
    1. 2. Capt. Robert Homes was born on 23 Jul 1694 in Stragolan, Fermanagh, Ireland; died in 1743 in Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts.
    2. Margaret Homes was born on 28 Feb 1696 in Strabane, Donacavey, Tyrone, Ireland; died on 26 Apr 1778 in Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts.

  3. 6.  Josiah Franklin was born on 23 Dec 1657 (son of Thomas Franklin and Jane White); died on 19 Jan 1745 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts; was buried in Granary Burying Ground, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: 23 Dec 1655
    • Alternate death: 16 Jan 1744, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts

    Josiah married Abiah Folger. Abiah (daughter of Peter Folger and Mary Morrill) was born on 15 Aug 1667 in Nantucket, Massachusetts; died on 18 May 1752 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts; was buried in Granary Burying Ground, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts. [Group Sheet]


  4. 7.  Abiah Folger was born on 15 Aug 1667 in Nantucket, Massachusetts (daughter of Peter Folger and Mary Morrill); died on 18 May 1752 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts; was buried in Granary Burying Ground, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts.
    Children:
    1. 3. Mary Franklin was born on 26 Sep 1695 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts; died about 1731 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts.
    2. Benjamin Franklin was born on 6 Jan 1706 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts; died on 17 Apr 1790 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  John Homes died in in Donoughmore, Donegal, Ireland.
    Children:
    1. 4. Rev. William Homes was born about 1663 in Donoughmore, Donegal, Ireland; died on 20 Jun 1746 in Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts.

  2. 10.  Rev. Robert Craighead was born about 1633; died on 22 Aug 1711 in Londonderry, Londonderry, Ireland.

    Notes:

    From the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography:

    Craghead, Robert (c. 1633–1711), minister of the Presbyterian General Synod of Ulster and author, was born in Scotland to unknown parents and graduated MA from the University of St Andrews in 1653. In 1658 he commenced his ministry in Donoughmore, co. Donegal. In 1661 he was one of thirty-six Presbyterian ministers in Ireland ejected from his parish for refusing to conform to the established church. He remained with his people and contrived to exercise an effective ministry among them. The troubles of 1689 drove him and his family into the besieged city of Londonderry, and from it to Glasgow, where for a time he ministered in a congregation.

    On 1 July 1690 he was called to be minister of the Presbyterian congregation in Londonderry, and remained there until his death. The bishop of Derry from 1691 to 1702 was William King, afterwards archbishop of Dublin. King had already crossed swords with Joseph Boyse, minister of Wood Street congregation in Dublin, on the subject of Presbyterian worship, hoping to persuade his readers to follow his own pilgrimage from Presbyterianism to Anglicanism. His representations of Presbyterian practice were factually incorrect, and Craghead felt impelled to answer them in two pamphlets, An Answer to a Late Book Intituled 'A Discourse Concerning the Inventions of Men in the Worship of God' (1694) and An Answer to the Bishop of Derry's Second Admonition to the Dissenting Inhabitants of his Diocese (1697). Neither work reveals Craghead as a particularly effective controversialist. His replies to King are orderly, thorough, and factual. They contain a wealth of information about Presbyterian life and spirituality, and especially about Presbyterian public worship. They confirm the very large numbers attending Presbyterian services in north-west Ulster at this time. While Boyse and Craghead display common purpose in their defence of Presbyterian forms of worship, it is fascinating to discern contrasting views on points of detail. Boyse reflects the broader and more English practice of Dublin Presbyterianism, while the stricter Ulster-Scot ethos of northern congregations is firmly embodied in Craghead's work. Craghead's pamphlets lack the grace of Boyse's writing, and the fire of good polemic, but are none the less an important contribution.

    Craghead's other writings were of a devotional and practical kind. His Advice for the Assurance of Salvation (1702) and the posthumous Walking with God (1712) have both been lost to posterity. His Advice to Communicants was first published in Glasgow in 1695, and was reprinted several times. It was an attempt to deal with many of the problems and difficulties felt by the ordinary people with whom Craghead worked as a pastor. It is a rich treasure house of Christian devotion and evidences the scrupulous care given by Craghead and others of his generation to the doubts and questions of his people. Through all his writings runs a firm Calvinist theology. Craghead married Agnes, daughter of the Rev. John Hart, minister of Taughboyne, and they had three sons: Thomas, Robert, and Samuel. Craghead died in Londonderry on 22 August 1711.

    Rev. married Agnes Heart about 1668. Agnes (daughter of Rev. John Heart and Agnes Baxter) was born before 17 Dec 1648. [Group Sheet]


  3. 11.  Agnes Heart was born before 17 Dec 1648 (daughter of Rev. John Heart and Agnes Baxter).

    Other Events:

    • Baptised: 17 Dec 1648, Dunino, Fife, Scotland

    Children:
    1. Rev. Thomas Craighead was born about 1670 in Donoughmore, Donegal, Ireland; died in Apr 1739 in Newville, Cumberland, Pennsyvania.
    2. 5. Katherine Craighead was born about 1672; died on 10 Apr 1754 in Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts.

  4. 12.  Thomas Franklin was born on 8 Oct 1598 in Ecton, Northamptonshire, England (son of Henry Franklin and Agnes James); died on 24 Mar 1682 in Banbury, Oxfordshire, England; was buried on 24 Mar 1682 in Banbury, Oxfordshire, England.

    Notes:

    A farmer and blacksmith.

    Thomas married Jane White in 1636. Jane died on 30 Oct 1662 in Ecton, Northamptonshire, England; was buried on 30 Oct 1662 in Ecton, Northamptonshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  5. 13.  Jane White died on 30 Oct 1662 in Ecton, Northamptonshire, England; was buried on 30 Oct 1662 in Ecton, Northamptonshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 6. Josiah Franklin was born on 23 Dec 1657; died on 19 Jan 1745 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts; was buried in Granary Burying Ground, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts.

  6. 14.  Peter Folger was born about 1617 in Norwich, Norfolk, England (son of John Folger and Merrable Gibbs); died in 1690 in Nantucket, Massachusetts; was buried in Founders Burial Ground, Nantucket, Massachusetts.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Aug 1617, Norwich, Norfolk, England
    • Alternate death: Apr 1690, Nantucket, Massachusetts

    Notes:

    Maternal grandfather of Benjamin Franklin; also an ancestor of J. A. Folger (1835-1889), founder of the Folgers coffee company.

    From the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography:

    Folger, Peter (1617–1690), interpreter and public official in America, was born in Norwich, the son of John Folger and Meriba Gibbs. Little is known of Folger until 1635, when he and his widower* father moved to Massachusetts. During the voyage Folger met Mary Morrill, an indentured servant, and apparently fell in love for he spent the next nine years of his life working as a weaver, miller, surveyor, and shoemaker to raise the £20 to buy out her contract and marry her in 1644. The couple had nine children that survived infancy. During the 1640s the family moved to Martha's Vineyard, an island settlement that was effectively ruled by the senior and junior Thomas Mayhew. There Folger began a long and prosperous career as an interpreter and cultural intermediary with the American Indian population. At the Mayhews' puritan mission he evangelized the native inhabitants and mastered Algonquian, a major Amerindian language family that would have enabled communication with the vast majority of American Indians in New England. About 1648 the younger Thomas Mayhew extended the mission to nearby Nantucket Island, part of the Mayhew proprietorship, which was home to several thousand American Indians. In 1659 Folger, who was by then familiar with the island through his missionary work, aided a group of white settlers who had purchased the island from the younger Thomas Mayhew in surveying Nantucket. That same year Folger also publicly declared himself a Baptist at a Martha's Vineyard town meeting, which undoubtedly agitated the puritan Mayhews and prompted Folger to move to the more tolerant colony of Rhode Island.

    In 1663 Folger returned to Nantucket at the request of the island's proprietors in order to soothe worsening tensions with the native population that had arisen mainly from the interference of the white settlement's cattle with Amerindian crops. As an enticement he was awarded a half share in the proprietorship (full shares were reserved for families of original white settlers). Nantucket was something of an anomaly in the puritan New England context in that established religion did not gain a substantial foothold among the whites until the eighteenth century. The only churches on the island in Folger's time, therefore, were found among the American Indians. In such tolerance Folger comfortably settled his family, acted as an intermediary with the American Indians, and continued his highly successful evangelizing efforts. He also worked as a teacher, surveyor, miller, and farmer, and even served as the clerk of courts.

    Folger's greatest triumph as chief diplomat to the American Indians came in 1665, when Metacom 'King Philip', arrived with a number of his warriors in pursuit of John Gibbs. Gibbs, an Amerindian from Nantucket who had recently finished his studies at Harvard, had insulted the powerful Pokanoket sachem by publicly speaking his father's name, Massasoit, which was an offence punishable by death. Gibbs was most likely a close friend of Folger, who had baptized the American Indian and given him the Christian name John Gibbs, which was the name of Folger's maternal grandfather. Neither the Amerindian nor the white population (about 100 people) was in a position to thwart Metacom through force, but Folger intervened to save Gibbs, offering his pursuer a ransom in exchange for Gibbs's life. Metacom agreed, but the people of Nantucket were only able to raise £11—significantly less than he wanted. An angry Metacom threatened to destroy the settlement, but the islanders called his bluff, threatening to attack him unless he departed, which he promptly did. A decade later Metacom led a coalition of Amerindians against New England in what became known as King Philip's War. The brutal fighting saw extensive slaughter and murder on both sides, but did not touch Nantucket.

    Folger died on Nantucket Island in 1690. He was survived by a substantial family that would produce a number of prominent American scientists, merchants, and politicians, the most famous of whom was Benjamin Franklin, Folger's grandson.

    -----
    * Editorial footnote: The Oxford DNB notwithstanding, John Folger was not a widower in 1635; he married Merrable Gibbs in England no later than 25 Jan 1609 and she outlived him on Martha's Vineyard by at least four years. For further particulars see the note on the marriage of John Folger to Merrable Gibbs.

    Peter married Mary Morrill in 1644 in Nantucket, Massachusetts. Mary was born about 1620 in England; died in 1704 in Nantucket, Massachusetts. [Group Sheet]


  7. 15.  Mary Morrill was born about 1620 in England; died in 1704 in Nantucket, Massachusetts.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Apr 1704, Nantucket, Massachusetts

    Notes:

    From Moby-Dick, chapter 24:

    But if, in the face of all this, you still declare that whaling has no aesthetically noble associations connected with it, then am I ready to shiver fifty lances with you there, and unhorse you with a split helmet every time.

    The whale has no famous author, and whaling no famous chronicler, you will say.

    The whale no famous author, and whaling no famous chronicler? Who wrote the first account of our Leviathan? Who but mighty Job! And who composed the first narrative of a whaling-voyage? Who, but no less a prince than Alfred the Great, who, with his own royal pen, took down the words from Other, the Norwegian whale-hunter of those times! And who pronounced our glowing eulogy in Parliament? Who, but Edmund Burke!

    True enough, but then whalemen themselves are poor devils; they have no good blood in their veins.

    No good blood in their veins? They have something better than royal blood there. The grandmother of Benjamin Franklin was Mary Morrel; afterwards, by marriage, Mary Folger, one of the old settlers of Nantucket, and the ancestress to a long line of Folgers and harpooneers--all kith and kin to noble Benjamin--this day darting the barbed iron from one side of the world to the other.

    Children:
    1. Bathshua Folger
    2. Bethia Folger died on 6 Jun 1669.
    3. Eleazer Folger
    4. 7. Abiah Folger was born on 15 Aug 1667 in Nantucket, Massachusetts; died on 18 May 1752 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts; was buried in Granary Burying Ground, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts.
    5. Experience Folger was born in 1668 in Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts; died on 4 Jun 1739 in Nantucket, Massachusetts.