Nielsen Hayden genealogy

William de Brewes

Male Abt 1224 - 1291  (~ 67 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  William de Brewes was born about 1224 in of Bramber, Sussex, England (son of John de Brewes and Margaret verch Llewelyn); died on 6 Jan 1291 in Findon, Sussex, England; was buried on 15 Jan 1291 in Sele Priory, West Sussex, England.

    Notes:

    "Sir William de Breuse, s. and h. of John de Breuse, Lord of Bramber and Gower, by Margaret, da. of Llewelyn ap Iorwerth, Prince of North Wales. He suc. his father in 1232, before 18 July, and was of full age before 15 July 1245. He was sum. cum equis et armis from 14 Mar. (1257/8) 42 Hen. III to 14 Mar. (1282/3) 11 Edw. I, and to attend the King at Shrewsbury, 28 June (1283) 11 Edw. I, by writs directed Willelmo de Breuse, Brehuse, or Brewes. He is recorded to have sat in the Parl. of Apr.-May 1290, whereby he may be held to have been Lord Brewose. He m., 1stly, Aline, da. of Thomas de Multon of Burgh-on-Sands, Cumberland, by Maud, da. and h. of Hubert de Vaux, of Gilsland in that co. He m., 2ndly, Agnes, da. of Nicholas de Moels, of Cadbury, Somerset by Hawise, widow of John de Botreaux, yr. da. and coh. of James de Newmarch, of Cadbury afsd. [See Moels.] He m., 3rdly, in or before 1271, Mary, da. of Robert de Ros of Helmsley, by Isabel, da. and h. of William d'Aubigny, of Belvoir. He d. 6 Jan. 1290/1 at Findon, West Sussex and was bur. at Sele Priory 15 Jan. His widow, whose dower was settled by deeds dated 21, 23 Mar. 1290/1, d. shortly before 23 May 1326." [Complete Peerage II:302, as corrected in Volume XIV.]

    William married Agnes de Moels. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Giles de Brewes died before 7 Jan 1305 in of Buckingham, Buckinghamshire, England.

    William married Aline de Multon before 1253. Aline (daughter of Thomas de Multon and Maud de Vaux) died before 1268. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. William de Brewes was born in in of Bramber, Sussex, England; died before 1 May 1326.

    William married Mary de Ros before 1272. Mary (daughter of Robert de Ros and Isabel d'Aubeney) died before 23 May 1326. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Peter de Brewes was born about 1273 in of Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England; died before 7 Feb 1312.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  John de Brewes was born about 1197 in of Gower, Swansea, Wales (son of William de Briouze and Maud de Clare); died between 1231 and 1232.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Abt 1198
    • Alternate death: Bef 16 Jul 1232, Bramber, Sussex, England
    • Alternate death: Bef 18 Jul 1232
    • Alternate death: 18 Jul 1232

    Notes:

    "He escaped from captivity with his three brothers in Jan. 1218, due to the influence of their uncle, Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester and Hertford. He promptly initiated proceedings in the king's court against his uncle, Reynold de Brewes. [...] JOHN DE BREWES, lord of Gower, was killed by a fall from his horse near Bramber, Sussex, shortly before 16 Jul 1232." [Royal Ancestry]

    John married Margaret verch Llewelyn in 1219. Margaret (daughter of Llewelyn Fawr ap Iorwerth and (One of the several mistresses of Llewelyn ap Iorwerth)) died in 1265. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Margaret verch Llewelyn (daughter of Llewelyn Fawr ap Iorwerth and (One of the several mistresses of Llewelyn ap Iorwerth)); died in 1265.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Aft 1268

    Notes:

    Also known as Marared; Margred; Margaret of Wales.

    Notes on the parentage of Gwladus and Margaret, daughters of Llwelyn ap Fawr:

    Complete Peerage (IX: 276) and Royal Ancestry both give Gwladus as a daughter of Joan of England. Royal Ancestry gives Margaret as an illegitimate daughter of Llywelyn.

    The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography says that Joan was "probably" the mother of Gwladus and Margaret.

    In The American Genealogist 41:99 (1965), Walter Lee Sheppard notes that "DNB's account gives Joan only the son David with Helen as probable. Lloyd's History of Wales [...] includes a chart so drawn as to make the maternity of the daughters questionable, and omits Angharad altogether. Prof. Thomas Jones Pierce in his article on Joan in the Dictionary of Welsh Biography names David, but does not mention the daughters at all; but then his cited sources are ony DNB and Lloyd's History of Wales in earlier editions. The correspondence of the writer with Sir Anthony Richard Wagner, Garter Principal King of Arms, however, indicates that all these daughters, with the exception of Gwladys, have been accepted by Major Francis Jones, best known authority on Welsh pedigrees, and based on British Museum Manuscript Add. 15041, on folio 12a, which shows Joan to be mother of David, Gwenlian, Angharad, and Margaret. It is interesting to note that [Complete Peerage] 9:276, under Mortimer of Wigmore, identifies Gwaldys as Joan's daughter."

    Later in the same publication, TAG 41:22, Sheppard provides an addendum, first quoting a letter from E. D. Jones, Librarian of the National Library of Wales: "Robert Vaughan of Hengwrt, a reliable seventeenth century authority, makes Gwladys full sister to Gruffydd, therefore the daughter of Tangwystl. He makes Gwenllian, Angharad and Marred (Margaret) to be daughters of Joan. I am inclined to accept the view that Gwladys Ddu was the daughter of Tangwystl, but in the absence of contemporary records it is not wise to be too dogmatic." Sheppard then continues: "Sir Anthony Richard Wagner KCVO, Garter Principal King of Arms, in a letter to the writer dated 24 Sept. 1964, states that he would accept Margaret as Joan's daughter and, presumably, the other daughters, except Gwladys. He refers to Major Francis Jones and the previously cited British Museum Additional MS, which shows Joan to be mother of David, and points out that the chronology also fits."

    Peter C. Bartrum's Welsh Genealogies (1974-83, searchable here; use the search term "Gruffudd ap Cynan 04"), gives Tangwystl as the mother of Gwladus and Joan as the probable mother of Margaret.

    William Addams Reitwiesner's "The Children of Joan, Princess of North Wales," in The Genealogist 1:80, Spring 1980, argues that we have no certain basis for regarding Joan as the mother of any of Llywelyn's daughters.

    On 9 April 1999, Douglas Richardson posted the following to SGM: "As for the Welsh tradition that any son, legitimate or otherwise, could make a claim to succeed Llywelyn, you may recall that Llywelyn and his son, David, went out of their way to have David recognized as Llywelyn's sole heir, to the exclusion of Llywelyn's illegitimate sons. To accomplish this, they had Llywelyn's wife, Joan, legitimized. The legitimization of Joan was no small feat seeing she was surely born out of wedlock to King John's mistress. Also, they sent David to England to be recognized as Llywelyn's sole heir by the English overlord, David's own uncle, King Henry III. Interestingly, the records of this trip show that David was accompanied by none other than his sister, Gladys. Due to the nature of this trip, it seems odd that Gladys would accompany David on this trip, UNLESS she too was a legitimate child of Llywelyn and Joan. These two pieces of evidence convince me that Gladys was legitimate."

    Children:
    1. 1. William de Brewes was born about 1224 in of Bramber, Sussex, England; died on 6 Jan 1291 in Findon, Sussex, England; was buried on 15 Jan 1291 in Sele Priory, West Sussex, England.
    2. Richard de Brewes was born before 1232 in of Stinton in Salle and Heydon, Norfolk, England; died before 18 Jun 1292; was buried in Woodbridge Priory, Suffolk, England.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  William de Briouze (son of William de Briouze and Maud de St. Valéry); died in 1210 in Windsor, Berkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 1210, Corfe Castle, Dorset, England

    Notes:

    "By order of King John, he was starved to death with his mother in the dungeons of Windsor Castle in 1210." [Royal Ancestry] Wikipedia says they were subsequently transferred to Corfe Castle in Dorset and died there. Ancestral Roots and CP place their deaths "at Corfe or Windsor Castle".

    William married Maud de Clare before 1198. Maud (daughter of Richard de Clare and Amice of Gloucester) died in 1213. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Maud de Clare (daughter of Richard de Clare and Amice of Gloucester); died in 1213.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Aft 10 Jul 1220

    Children:
    1. Maud de Briouze
    2. 2. John de Brewes was born about 1197 in of Gower, Swansea, Wales; died between 1231 and 1232.

  3. 6.  Llewelyn Fawr ap Iorwerth was born about 1173 (son of Iorwerth Drwyndwn ap Owain Gwynedd and Margred verch Madog); died on 11 Apr 1240 in Aberconwy Abbey, Conwy, Wales; was buried in Aberconwy Abbey, Conwy, Wales.

    Notes:

    "The Great." Prince of Wales; Prince of Aberffraw; Lord of Snowden. Died as a Cistercian monk.

    Llewelyn married (One of the several mistresses of Llewelyn ap Iorwerth). [Group Sheet]


  4. 7.  (One of the several mistresses of Llewelyn ap Iorwerth)
    Children:
    1. 3. Margaret verch Llewelyn died in 1265.
    2. Ellen died after Feb 1294.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  William de Briouze was born in in of Briouze, Normandy, France (son of William de Briouze and Bertha of Hereford); died on 9 Aug 1211 in Corbeil, near Paris, France.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: of Bramber, Sussex, England
    • Alternate death: Sep 1211, Corbeil, near Paris, France

    Notes:

    "William was the most notable member of the de Braose dynasty. His steady rise and sudden fall at the hands of King John is often taken as an example of that king's arbitrary and capricious behaviour towards his barons." [Wikipedia]

    "William de Briouze, Lord of Briouze, Bramber, Brecon, Over Gwent, &c., s. and h. He m. Maud De St. Valery, "Lady of La Haie." In consequence of his well-known quarrel with King John, his lands were forfeited in 1208, and his wife and 1st s. starved to death in the dungeons of Corfe (or of Windsor) in 1210. He d. at Corbeil near Paris, 9, and was bur. 10 Aug. 1211, in the Abbey of St. Victor at Paris." [Complete Peerage I:22]

    "He slaughtered Seisyll ap Dyvnwal (abovenamed) and a host of unarmed Welshmen, in the castle of Abergavenny in 1175, in revenge for the death of his uncle Henry of Hereford [Brut y Tywysogian, R. de Diceto, etc.). Seisyll was owner of Castle Arnold, and is said in an inaccurate version of the Brut to have captured Abergavenny in 1172, the slaughter being dated 1177 (The Gwentian Chronicle, Cambrian Arch. Assoc, p. 137). But the better version of the Brut (Rolls Ser., p. 218; Y Brutieu, in Welsh Texts, ed. Rhys and Evans, 1890, p. 330) on the contrary, states that Seisyll was captured in 1172 by the garrison of Abergavenny. (ex inform. G. W. Watson.)" [Complete Peerage I:22, footnote (a).]

    William married Maud de St. Valéry. Maud (daughter of Bernard de St. Valéry and Matilda) was born about 1150; died in 1210 in Windsor, Berkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 9.  Maud de St. Valéry was born about 1150 (daughter of Bernard de St. Valéry and Matilda); died in 1210 in Windsor, Berkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 1210, Corfe Castle, Dorset, England

    Notes:

    Also called Maud de Braose; Moll Wallbee; Lady of La Haie.

    From Wikipedia:

    "In 1208, William de Braose quarrelled with his friend and patron King John. The reason is not known but it is alleged that Maud made indiscreet comments regarding the murder of King John's nephew Arthur of Brittany. There was also a large sum of money (five thousand marks) de Braose owed the King. Whatever the reason, John demanded Maud's son William be sent to him as a hostage for her husband's loyalty. Maud refused, and stated loudly within earshot of the King's officers that 'she would not deliver her children to a king who had murdered his own nephew.' The King quickly led troops to the Welsh border and seized all of the castles that belonged to William de Braose. Maud and her eldest son William fled to Ireland, where they found refuge at Trim Castle with the de Lacys, the family of her daughter Margaret. In 1210, King John sent an expedition to Ireland. Maud and her son escaped but were apprehended in Galloway by Donnchadh, Earl of Carrick. After being briefly held at Carrickfergus Castle, they were dispatched to England.

    "Maud and her son William were first imprisoned at Windsor Castle, but were shortly afterwards transferred to Corfe Castle in Dorset where they were placed inside the dungeon. Maud and William both starved to death. [...]

    "Maud de Braose features in many Welsh legends. There is one which says that Maud built the castle of Hay-on-Wye single-handed in one night, carrying the stones in her apron. She was also said to have been extremely tall and often donned armour while leading troops into battle."

    Children:
    1. 4. William de Briouze died in 1210 in Windsor, Berkshire, England.
    2. Reynold de Briouze was born in in of Abergavenny, Monmouthshire, Wales; died between 1227 and 1228.
    3. Bertha de Briouze
    4. Matilda de Briouze died on 29 Dec 1210 in Llanbardarn Fawr, Ceredigion, Wales; was buried in Strata Florida Abbey, Ceredigion, Wales.
    5. Margaret de Briouze was born about 1181; died after 25 Jun 1245.

  3. 10.  Richard de Clare was born about 1153 in of Clare, Suffolk, England (son of Roger de Clare and Maud de St. Hilary); died between 30 Oct 1217 and 28 Nov 1217.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Abt 1155
    • Alternate death: Nov 1217
    • Alternate death: 28 Nov 1217

    Notes:

    Earl of Hertford and of Gloucester. Also styled Earl of Clare.

    Along with his son Gilbert, he was one of the 25 Magna Carta sureties.

    Richard married Amice of Gloucester about 1180. Amice (daughter of William fitz Robert and Hawise of Leicester) died on 1 Jan 1225. [Group Sheet]


  4. 11.  Amice of Gloucester (daughter of William fitz Robert and Hawise of Leicester); died on 1 Jan 1225.

    Notes:

    Also called Amice fitz William.

    According to RA, she was not "recognized" before her death as "Countess of Gloucester," despite CP's assertion to this effect. All contemporary charters and other documents involving her refer to her as countess of Clare, i.e., Hertford.

    Children:
    1. 5. Maud de Clare died in 1213.
    2. Hawise de Clare died after 1234.
    3. Gilbert de Clare was born about 1180; died on 25 Oct 1230 in Penrose, Brittany, France; was buried in Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England.

  5. 12.  Iorwerth Drwyndwn ap Owain Gwynedd (son of Owain Gwynned, King of Gwynedd and Gwladus verch Llywarch); died about 1174.

    Notes:

    Drwyndwn, "flatnose."

    Iorwerth married Margred verch Madog. [Group Sheet]


  6. 13.  Margred verch Madog (daughter of Madog ap Maredudd, Prince of Powys Fadog and Susanna ferch Gruffydd ap Cynan).

    Notes:

    Also called Marared of Powys.

    Children:
    1. 6. Llewelyn Fawr ap Iorwerth was born about 1173; died on 11 Apr 1240 in Aberconwy Abbey, Conwy, Wales; was buried in Aberconwy Abbey, Conwy, Wales.