Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Maud Gray

Female - Aft 1451


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Maud Gray was born in in of Heaton Castle, Wark-on-Tweed, Northumberland, England (daughter of Thomas III Gray and Joan Mowbray); died after 22 Aug 1451.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Aft 1451
    • Alternate death: Aft 1454

    Maud married Robert Ogle about 21 May 1399. Robert (son of Robert Ogle and Joan Heton) was born about 1379; died on 12 Aug 1436. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. Elizabeth Ogle

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Thomas III Gray was born about 1359 in of Heaton, Wark-on-Tweed, Northumberland, England (son of Thomas II Gray and Margaret de Presfen); died on 26 Nov 1400.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Abt 30 Nov 1400
    • Alternate death: 3 Dec 1400

    Notes:

    Steward of Water Skirlaw, Bishop of Durham, 1389-91. Deputy Warden for the East March for Thomas Mowbray, Earl Marshal, c. 1389-91. Constable of Norham Castle and Steward, Sheriff, Escheator, and Chief Justice of the episcopal liberty of Norhamshire and Islandshire, 1395-1400. Knighted by Nov 1385.

    Knight of the shire for Northumberland, Jan 1397 and 1399.

    His son Sir Thomas Gray was one of the three conspirators in the 1415 "Southampton Plot" against Henry V.

    Thomas married Joan Mowbray before 1384. Joan (daughter of John Mowbray and Elizabeth de Segrave) died after 1407. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Joan Mowbray (daughter of John Mowbray and Elizabeth de Segrave); died after 1407.
    Children:
    1. 1. Maud Gray was born in in of Heaton Castle, Wark-on-Tweed, Northumberland, England; died after 22 Aug 1451.
    2. Thomas Gray was born on 30 Nov 1384; died on 2 Aug 1415 in Southampton, Hampshire, England.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Thomas II GrayThomas II Gray was born about 1315 in Heaton Castle, Wark-on-Tweed, Northumberland, England (son of Thomas I Gray and Agnes); died before 22 Oct 1369 in Chillingham, Glendale, Northumberland, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Bef 22 Oct 1369, Chillingham, Glendale, Northumberland, England

    Notes:

    Author of the Scalacronica.

    Post to soc. genealogy.medieval, 11 Aug 2014:

    From: John Watson
    Subject: Origin of the Grays of Heton, Northumberland

    Dear all,

    One of the best examples of upward social mobility in fourteenth century England was that of the family of Gray of Heton (modern day Heaton, about two miles south of the River Tweed in Northumberland). Their origins are however, obscure. Almost all of the published materials concerning the early Gray family rely on one source; the pedigree shown in Joseph Stevenson's translation of the Scalacronica printed in 1836 [1]. Although Stevenson provides the documents upon which he based the pedigree, he apparently errs in the parentage of the first Sir Thomas Gray, who started the family's rise to fortune. Stevenson shows Thomas' father as another Sir Thomas Gray of Heton, son of a Sir John Gray of Berwick who died about 1246.

    There is however, another medieval document, now in the National Archives, which shows the actual parentage of the first Sir Thomas Gray and which was apparently not noticed by Stevenson. This is a plea to the king in 1334, by Sir Robert Gray, the brother of Sir Thomas Gray.

    "Robert Gray seeks the restoration of property in Berwickshire. 1) His father held a mill at Lauder and other tenements in Hydegate in Berwick in the time of King Alexander [1249-1286], but was ousted during the wars. This property is now in the king's hands. 2) He also held a third part of Simprim, as the heir of William de Fenton, which he lost at the same time. Regarding the mill at Lauder and the tenements in Berwick, they say that Robert de Gray senior had three sons, namely John, Robert and Thomas, and that he granted this property to his son Robert, who held it until he was ousted in the war by Andrew Gray, whose heirs were dispossessed by his forfeiture. The property is in the King's hands and has not been re-granted. 2) Regarding the land at Simprim they say that William de Fenton was seised in the time of King Alexander, and granted it to Geoffrey de Caldecotes and his heirs, who held it until they were dispossessed by the war of Edward I. William de Fenton re-entered it and enfeoffed Robert Gray, who was seised until he was removed by the war of Robert Bruce. William de Fenton re-entered it for the third time, and Robert de Caldecotes, son and heir of Geoffrey, recovered it against the said William by assize of morte d'ancestor, and was seised until he went into Scotland" [2].

    Robert, the father of Sir Robert Gray the petitioner, lived in the second half of the thirteenth century, and was holding land on both sides of the border in Berwickshire and Northumberland. In 1296-7, at the outbreak of Edward I's wars with Scotland, such cross-border families had to make a choice between allegiance to the crown of England or Scotland. It appears from the above document that John, his eldest son, chose Scotland whilst his two younger sons, Thomas and Robert, chose to serve Edward I and II.

    In late 1311, an entry in French in the register of Richard Kellawe, Bishop of Durham, records that Sir (sire) Robert Gray had held the manor of Heton [Heaton] in Norhamshire of the bishop of Durham, by the law of England [after the death of his wife] of the inheritance of his son John. John had died in Scotland not in the fealty of the king of England and the manor had been seized as a forfeit of war by Anthony Bek, Bishop of Durham [died 3 March 1311]. The king, during the vacancy of the see of Durham, had granted the manor of Heton to Walter de Wodeham, who had also died. Bishop Kellawe petitioned the king for the return of the manor [3].

    The king's grant of Heton to Walter de Wodeham is recorded in the Patent Rolls: "1 April 1311, Grant, in fee, to Walter de Wodeham, king's yeoman, of the manor of Heton, with a toft and 3 acres of land in Norham, co. Northumberland, late of Juliana Gray, which, on account of the rebellion of John Gray her son and heir, was escheated" [4]. This gives us the name of Sir Robert Gray's wife, Julian. She was most probably the daughter and heiress of Sir William de Heton who was holding Heton at the time of the Testa de Nevill in 1284-5 [5]. This would explain why Sir Robert Gray was holding the land only by the courtesy of England after her death, of the inheritance of his son John.

    Bishop Richard Kellawe was evidently successful in regaining the manor of Heton from the king, because on 28 October 1312, he granted and quitclaimed the manor of Heton in Norhamshire to Sir Thomas Gray, knight and Agnes his wife, and their heirs to hold of the bishop and his heirs in perpetuity [6]. This suggests that Thomas was the second son of Robert and was the next heir of his mother and brother John. Robert the third brother, had been granted property in Berwickshire by their father.

    Sir Thomas, son of Sir Robert Gray of Heton married, before 1312, Agnes, whose parentage is unknown. He was probably born between 1275 and 1280. His son Sir Thomas Gray II, records in the Scalacronica that he was a soldier serving in Scotland in May 1297 when he survived an ambush on English forces by William Wallace [7]. He was knighted before 1302, when Sir Thomas Gray is recorded as serving in the garrison of Berwick. Gray spent most of his life in military service, either in Scotland or on the borders. He was constable of the strategically important border castle of Norham until 1328. He died shortly before 10 April 1344 when bishop Bury granted a pardon to Thomas son of Sir Thomas Gray, knight, deceased, for his father's transgressions [8].

    Thomas Gray seems to have had only one son, Thomas who was born about 1315, the author of the Scalacronica, which he started writing when a prisoner of war in Scotland in 1355. Thomas and Agnes also had several daughters who were married into the northern English gentry. Some of these daughters have previously been discussed in this group. They are (in no particular order):

    Margaret wife of Sir John Eure of Stokesley, Yorkshire (d. 21 March 1366). She died before 3 August 1378.

    Isabel wife of Sir William Heron of Ford, Northumberland (d. 21 December 1379). She died after 1362.

    Agnes wife of Sir Gerard Salvain of Harswell, Yorkshire (d. 1 August 1369). She died before 1362.

    An unnamed daughter who married Sir William Felton of Northumberland (d. before 24 February 1360) as his first wife. She died before January 1332.

    Possibly Alice wife of John Burradon of Eworth, Northumberland. She died s.p. before 1362.

    Sir Robert son of Sir Robert Gray, the petitioner in 1334 for his father's property in Berwickshire, was also a soldier. Before January 1319 when he petitioned the king for payment of his wages, he had been sheriff of Lanark and constable of Rotherglen castle and in the garrison of Berwick-on-Tweed [9]. Raine says that he died in 1338 and was the ancestor of the Grays of Cornhill, but there is no clear evidence for this [10].

    So the revised pedigree of Gray of Heton looks like this:



    Best regards,

    John

    [1] Joseph Stevenson, ed., Scalacronica: By Sir Thomas Gray of Heton, Knight. A Chronicle of England and Scotland from A.D. MLXVI to A.D. MCCLXII. Now First Printed from the Unique Manuscript. With an Introduction and Notes, Maitland Club (Edinburgh, 1836), xxxiv.

    [2] TNA: SC 8/115/5714A.

    [3] Thomas Duffus Hardy, ed., Registrum Palatinum Dunelmense. The Register of Richard de Kellawe, Lord Palatinate and Bishop of Durham, 1311-1316, vol. 1, Rolls Series (London, 1873), 77-8.

    [4] Calendar of Patent Rolls, Edward II, vol. 1, 1307-1313 (London, 1894), 337.

    [5] James Raine, The History and Antiquities of North Durham (London, 1852), 326.

    [6] Thomas Duffus Hardy, ed., Registrum Palatinum Dunelmense. The Register of Richard de Kellawe, Lord Palatinate and Bishop of Durham, 1311-1316, vol. 2, Rolls Series (London, 1874), 1170.

    [7] Herbert Maxwell, ed., Scalacronica. The Reigns of Edward I, Edward II and Edward III as Recorded by Sir Thomas Gray (Glasgow, 1907), 18.

    [8] G. W. Kitchin, ed., Richard D'Aungerville of Bury: Fragments of His Register, and Other Documents, Surtees Society 119, 1910, 58.

    [9] Calendar of Close Rolls, Edward II: vol. 3: 1318-1323 (1895), 53

    [10] Raine, The History and Antiquities of North Durham, 184.

    Author of the Scalacronica.

    His grandson Sir Thomas Gray was one of the three conspirators in the 1415 "Southampton Plot" against Henry V.

    Post to soc. genealogy.medieval, 11 Aug 2014:

    From: John Watson
    Subject: Origin of the Grays of Heton, Northumberland

    Dear all,

    One of the best examples of upward social mobility in fourteenth century England was that of the family of Gray of Heton (modern day Heaton, about two miles south of the River Tweed in Northumberland). Their origins are however, obscure. Almost all of the published materials concerning the early Gray family rely on one source; the pedigree shown in Joseph Stevenson's translation of the Scalacronica printed in 1836 [1]. Although Stevenson provides the documents upon which he based the pedigree, he apparently errs in the parentage of the first Sir Thomas Gray, who started the family's rise to fortune. Stevenson shows Thomas' father as another Sir Thomas Gray of Heton, son of a Sir John Gray of Berwick who died about 1246.

    There is however, another medieval document, now in the National Archives, which shows the actual parentage of the first Sir Thomas Gray and which was apparently not noticed by Stevenson. This is a plea to the king in 1334, by Sir Robert Gray, the brother of Sir Thomas Gray.

    "Robert Gray seeks the restoration of property in Berwickshire. 1) His father held a mill at Lauder and other tenements in Hydegate in Berwick in the time of King Alexander [1249-1286], but was ousted during the wars. This property is now in the king's hands. 2) He also held a third part of Simprim, as the heir of William de Fenton, which he lost at the same time. Regarding the mill at Lauder and the tenements in Berwick, they say that Robert de Gray senior had three sons, namely John, Robert and Thomas, and that he granted this property to his son Robert, who held it until he was ousted in the war by Andrew Gray, whose heirs were dispossessed by his forfeiture. The property is in the King's hands and has not been re-granted. 2) Regarding the land at Simprim they say that William de Fenton was seised in the time of King Alexander, and granted it to Geoffrey de Caldecotes and his heirs, who held it until they were dispossessed by the war of Edward I. William de Fenton re-entered it and enfeoffed Robert Gray, who was seised until he was removed by the war of Robert Bruce. William de Fenton re-entered it for the third time, and Robert de Caldecotes, son and heir of Geoffrey, recovered it against the said William by assize of morte d'ancestor, and was seised until he went into Scotland" [2].

    Robert, the father of Sir Robert Gray the petitioner, lived in the second half of the thirteenth century, and was holding land on both sides of the border in Berwickshire and Northumberland. In 1296-7, at the outbreak of Edward I's wars with Scotland, such cross-border families had to make a choice between allegiance to the crown of England or Scotland. It appears from the above document that John, his eldest son, chose Scotland whilst his two younger sons, Thomas and Robert, chose to serve Edward I and II.

    In late 1311, an entry in French in the register of Richard Kellawe, Bishop of Durham, records that Sir (sire) Robert Gray had held the manor of Heton [Heaton] in Norhamshire of the bishop of Durham, by the law of England [after the death of his wife] of the inheritance of his son John. John had died in Scotland not in the fealty of the king of England and the manor had been seized as a forfeit of war by Anthony Bek, Bishop of Durham [died 3 March 1311]. The king, during the vacancy of the see of Durham, had granted the manor of Heton to Walter de Wodeham, who had also died. Bishop Kellawe petitioned the king for the return of the manor [3].

    The king's grant of Heton to Walter de Wodeham is recorded in the Patent Rolls: "1 April 1311, Grant, in fee, to Walter de Wodeham, king's yeoman, of the manor of Heton, with a toft and 3 acres of land in Norham, co. Northumberland, late of Juliana Gray, which, on account of the rebellion of John Gray her son and heir, was escheated" [4]. This gives us the name of Sir Robert Gray's wife, Julian. She was most probably the daughter and heiress of Sir William de Heton who was holding Heton at the time of the Testa de Nevill in 1284-5 [5]. This would explain why Sir Robert Gray was holding the land only by the courtesy of England after her death, of the inheritance of his son John.

    Bishop Richard Kellawe was evidently successful in regaining the manor of Heton from the king, because on 28 October 1312, he granted and quitclaimed the manor of Heton in Norhamshire to Sir Thomas Gray, knight and Agnes his wife, and their heirs to hold of the bishop and his heirs in perpetuity [6]. This suggests that Thomas was the second son of Robert and was the next heir of his mother and brother John. Robert the third brother, had been granted property in Berwickshire by their father.

    Sir Thomas, son of Sir Robert Gray of Heton married, before 1312, Agnes, whose parentage is unknown. He was probably born between 1275 and 1280. His son Sir Thomas Gray II, records in the Scalacronica that he was a soldier serving in Scotland in May 1297 when he survived an ambush on English forces by William Wallace [7]. He was knighted before 1302, when Sir Thomas Gray is recorded as serving in the garrison of Berwick. Gray spent most of his life in military service, either in Scotland or on the borders. He was constable of the strategically important border castle of Norham until 1328. He died shortly before 10 April 1344 when bishop Bury granted a pardon to Thomas son of Sir Thomas Gray, knight, deceased, for his father's transgressions [8].

    Thomas Gray seems to have had only one son, Thomas who was born about 1315, the author of the Scalacronica, which he started writing when a prisoner of war in Scotland in 1355. Thomas and Agnes also had several daughters who were married into the northern English gentry. Some of these daughters have previously been discussed in this group. They are (in no particular order):

    Margaret wife of Sir John Eure of Stokesley, Yorkshire (d. 21 March 1366). She died before 3 August 1378.

    Isabel wife of Sir William Heron of Ford, Northumberland (d. 21 December 1379). She died after 1362.

    Agnes wife of Sir Gerard Salvain of Harswell, Yorkshire (d. 1 August 1369). She died before 1362.

    An unnamed daughter who married Sir William Felton of Northumberland (d. before 24 February 1360) as his first wife. She died before January 1332.

    Possibly Alice wife of John Burradon of Eworth, Northumberland. She died s.p. before 1362.

    Sir Robert son of Sir Robert Gray, the petitioner in 1334 for his father's property in Berwickshire, was also a soldier. Before January 1319 when he petitioned the king for payment of his wages, he had been sheriff of Lanark and constable of Rotherglen castle and in the garrison of Berwick-on-Tweed [9]. Raine says that he died in 1338 and was the ancestor of the Grays of Cornhill, but there is no clear evidence for this [10].

    So the revised pedigree of Gray of Heton looks like this:



    Best regards,

    John

    [1] Joseph Stevenson, ed., Scalacronica: By Sir Thomas Gray of Heton, Knight. A Chronicle of England and Scotland from A.D. MLXVI to A.D. MCCLXII. Now First Printed from the Unique Manuscript. With an Introduction and Notes, Maitland Club (Edinburgh, 1836), xxxiv.

    [2] TNA: SC 8/115/5714A.

    [3] Thomas Duffus Hardy, ed., Registrum Palatinum Dunelmense. The Register of Richard de Kellawe, Lord Palatinate and Bishop of Durham, 1311-1316, vol. 1, Rolls Series (London, 1873), 77-8.

    [4] Calendar of Patent Rolls, Edward II, vol. 1, 1307-1313 (London, 1894), 337.

    [5] James Raine, The History and Antiquities of North Durham (London, 1852), 326.

    [6] Thomas Duffus Hardy, ed., Registrum Palatinum Dunelmense. The Register of Richard de Kellawe, Lord Palatinate and Bishop of Durham, 1311-1316, vol. 2, Rolls Series (London, 1874), 1170.

    [7] Herbert Maxwell, ed., Scalacronica. The Reigns of Edward I, Edward II and Edward III as Recorded by Sir Thomas Gray (Glasgow, 1907), 18.

    [8] G. W. Kitchin, ed., Richard D'Aungerville of Bury: Fragments of His Register, and Other Documents, Surtees Society 119, 1910, 58.

    [9] Calendar of Close Rolls, Edward II: vol. 3: 1318-1323 (1895), 53

    [10] Raine, The History and Antiquities of North Durham, 184.

    Thomas married Margaret de Presfen about 1352. Margaret (daughter of William de Presfen) was born in in of Middleton, Northumberland, England; died before 15 Aug 1403. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  Margaret de Presfen was born in in of Middleton, Northumberland, England (daughter of William de Presfen); died before 15 Aug 1403.

    Notes:

    Or Pressen, Pressene.

    Children:
    1. Elizabeth Gray died on 11 Aug 1412.
    2. 2. Thomas III Gray was born about 1359 in of Heaton, Wark-on-Tweed, Northumberland, England; died on 26 Nov 1400.

  3. 6.  John Mowbray was born on 25 Jun 1340 in Epworth, Lincolnshire, England (son of John de Mowbray and Joan of Lancaster); died on 17 Jun 1368 in Thrace, near Constantinople; was buried in Church and Convent of St. Mary Draperis of Pera, Constantinople.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: 13 Sep 1340, Bretby, Repton, Derbyshire, England
    • Alternate death: 21 Sep 1368, near Constantinople
    • Alternate death: 9 Oct 1368, near Constantinople

    Notes:

    Summoned to Parliament by writ, 14 Aug 1362 to 20 Jan 1366.

    Killed in battle with the Turks.

    John Mowbray and Elizabeth de Segrave were Gx4-grandparents of Anne Boleyn (d. 1536):

    John de Mowbray = Elizabeth de Segrave
    Thomas de Mowbray = Elizabeth Fitz Alan
    Margaret de Mowbray = Thomas Howard
    John Howard = Katherine de Moleyns
    Thomas Howard = Elizabeth Tilney
    Elizabeth Howard = Thomas Boleyn
    Anne Boleyn = Henry VIII
    Elizabeth I

    Making TNH a sixth cousin to Elizabeth I, fifteen times removed.

    John married Elizabeth de Segrave after 25 Mar 1349. Elizabeth (daughter of John de Segrave and Margaret Marshal) was born on 25 Oct 1338 in Croxton Abbey, Melton Mobray, Leicestershire, England; died between 1364 and 1368. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 7.  Elizabeth de Segrave was born on 25 Oct 1338 in Croxton Abbey, Melton Mobray, Leicestershire, England (daughter of John de Segrave and Margaret Marshal); died between 1364 and 1368.

    Other Events:

    • Baptised: 25 Oct 1338, Croxton Abbey, Melton Mobray, Leicestershire, England
    • Alternate death: Bef 1368
    • Alternate death: 21 Sep 1368
    • Alternate death: 9 Oct 1368
    • Alternate death: Abt 1375

    Notes:

    Suo jure Lady Segrave.

    Notes:

    Married by papal dispensation, being third cousins, both descended from Henry III and Eleanor of Provence.

    Children:
    1. 3. Joan Mowbray died after 1407.
    2. Eleanor Mowbray was born before 1361.
    3. Thomas Mowbray was born on 22 Mar 1367; died on 22 Sep 1399 in Venice, Veneto, Italy; was buried in Venice, Veneto, Italy.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Thomas I Gray was born about 1277 in of Heaton, Wark-on-Tweed, Northumberland, England (son of Robert Gray and Juliana de Heton); died before 1343.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Bef 12 Mar 1344

    Thomas married Agnes. Agnes died after 13 Sep 1322. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  Agnes died after 13 Sep 1322.

    Notes:

    The Wallop Family [citation details below] calls her Agnes de Beyle.

    Notes:

    Married:
    7743118

    Children:
    1. Isabel Gray was born in in of Heaton, Wark-on-Tweed, Northumberland, England; died after 1362.
    2. Alice Gray was born before 13 Mar 1309; died before 1362.
    3. 4. Thomas II Gray was born about 1315 in Heaton Castle, Wark-on-Tweed, Northumberland, England; died before 22 Oct 1369 in Chillingham, Glendale, Northumberland, England.

  3. 10.  William de Presfen was born in in of Middleton, Northumberland, England; died after Jan 1358.

    Notes:

    Or Pressene.

    Children:
    1. 5. Margaret de Presfen was born in in of Middleton, Northumberland, England; died before 15 Aug 1403.

  4. 12.  John de Mowbray was born on 29 Nov 1310 in Hovingham, Yorkshire, England (son of John de Mowbray and Aline de Brewes); died on 4 Oct 1361 in York, Yorkshire, England; was buried in Friars Minor, Bedford, Bedfordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: of Axholme, Lincolnshire, England

    Notes:

    Governor of Berwick-on-Tweed. He was summoned to Parliament by writs from 10 Dec 1327 to 20 Nov 1360.

    One of the commanders of the English army at the Battle of Neville's Cross. Present at the Siege of Calais.

    Died "of pestilence" [Royal Ancestry].

    From the original Dictionary of National Biography (article by James Tait):

    MOWBRAY, JOHN (II) de, ninth Baron (d.1361), son of John (I) de Mowbray, was released from the Tower, and his father's lands were restored to him, on the deposition of Edward II in January 1327. Though still under age he was allowed livery of his lands, but his marriage was granted, for services to Queen Isabella, to Henry, earl, of Lancaster, who married him to his fifth daughter, Joan. His mother's great estates in Gower, Sussex, &c., came to him on her death in 1331. Henceforth he styled himself 'Lord of the Isle of Axholme and of the Honours of Gower and Bramber.' The De Brewers inheritance involved him in a protracted litigation with his mother's cousin, Thomas de Brewes which had begun as early as 1338, and was still proceeding in 1347. Mowbray had also had a dispute before his mother's death with her second husband, Sir Richard Peshall, touching certain manors in Bedfordshire, &c., which he and his mother had granted to him for life, and in 1329 forcibly entered them.

    Mowbray was regularly summoned to the parliaments and 'colloquia' from 1328 to 1361, and was a member of the king's council from the former year. In 1327, 1333, 1335, and again in 1337, he served against the Scots; but there is little evidence for Dugdale's statement that he frequently served in France. In 1337, when war with France was impending he was ordered as lord of Gower to arm his tenants; next year he had to provide ships for the king's passage to the continent, and was sent down to his Sussex estates in the prospect of a French landing. According to Froissart, he was with the king in Flanders in October 1339, but this is impossible, for he was present at the parliament held in that month, and was ordered to repair towards his Yorkshire estates to defend the Scottish marches. Next year he was appointed justiciar of Lothian and governor of Berwick, towards whose garrison he was to provide 120 men, including ten knights. In September 1341 he was commanded to furnish Balliol with men from Yorkshire. On 20 Dec. 1342 he received orders to hold himself ready to go to the assistance of the king in Brittany by 1 March 1348, and Froissart makes him take part in the siege of Nantes; but the truce of Malestroit was concluded on 19 Jan., and on 6 Feb. the reinforecments were countermanded.

    At Neville's Cross (17 Oct. 1346) Mowbray fought in the third line, and the Lanercost chronicler loudly sings his praises: 'He was full of grace and kindness -- the conduct both of himself and his men was such as to redound to their perpetual honour'. Froissart, nevertheless, again takes him to France, with the king. In 1347 he was again in the Scottish marches. On the expiration, in 1352, of one of the short truces which began in 1347, he was appointed chief of the commissioners charged with the defence of the Yorkshire coast against the French, and required to furnish thirty men from Gower. The king sent him once more to the Scottish border in 1355. In December 1359 he was made a justice of the peace in the district of Holland, Lincolnshire, and in the following February a commissioner of array at Leicester for Lancashire, Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire, Derbyshire, and Rutland. This, taken with the fact that he was summoned on 3 April 1360 to the parliament fixed for 15 May, makes it excessively improbable that he was skirmishing before Paris in April as stated by Froissart. It is possible, however, that the Sire de Montbrai mentioned by Froissart was Mowbray's son and heir, John.

    Mowbray died at York of the plague on 4 Oct. 1361, and was buried in the Franciscan church at Bedford. The favourable testimony which the Lanercost chronicler bears to the character of John de Mowbray is borne out by a piece of documentary evidence. In order to put an end to disputes between his steward and his tenants in Axholme, he executed a deed on 1 May 1359 reserving a certain part of the extensive wastes in the isle to himself, and granting the remainder in perpetuum to the tenants. This deed was jealously preserved as the palladium of the commoners of Axholme in Haxey Church 'in a chest bound with iron, whose key was kept by some of the chiefest freeholders, under a window wherein was a portraiture of Mowbray, set in ancient stained glass, holding in his hand a writing, commonly reported to be an emblem of the deed'. This window was broken down in the 'rebellious times,' when the rights of the commoners under the deed were in large measure overridden, in spite of their protests, by the drainage scheme which was begun by Cornelius Vermuyden in 1626 and led to riots in 1642, and again in 1697.

    Mowbray's wife was Joan, fifth daughter of Henry, third earl of Lancaster. His one son, John (III) de Mowbray (1328?-1368), was probably born in 1329, and succeeded as tenth baron. Before 1353 he had married Elizabeth, the only child and heiress of John sixth lord Segrave, on whose death in that year he entered into possession of her lands, lying chiefly in Leicestershire, where the manors of Segrave, Sileby, and Mount Sorrel rounded off the Mowbray estates about Melton Mowbray, and in Warwickshire, where the castle and manor of Caludon and other lordships increased the Mowbray holding in that county. The mother of Mowbray's wife, Margaret Plantagenet, was the sole heiress of Thomas of Brotherton, the second surviving son of Edward I, and she, on the death of her father in 1338, inherited the title and vast heritage in eastern England of the Bigods, earls of Norfolk, together with the great hereditary office of marshal of England, which had been conferred on her father. Neither her son-in-law, John de Mowbray the younger, nor his two successors were fated to enjoy her inheritance; for the countess marshal survived them, as well as a second husband, Sir Walter Manny, and lived until May 1399. But in the fifteenth century the Mowbrays entered into actual possession of the old Bigod lands, and removed their chief place of residence from the mansion of the Vine Garths at Epworth in Axholme to Framlingham Castle in Suffolk. John III met with an untimely death at the hands of the Turks near Constantinople, on his way to the Holy Land, in 1368. His elder son, John IV, eleventh baron Mowbray of Axholme, was created Earl of Nottingham on the day of Richard II's coronation; his second son, Thomas (I) de Mowbray, twelfth baron Mowbray and first duke of Norfolk, is separately noticed.

    John married Joan of Lancaster between 28 Feb 1327 and 4 Jun 1328. Joan (daughter of Henry of Lancaster and Maud de Chaworth) was born about 1312; died after 1345; was buried in Byland, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  5. 13.  Joan of Lancaster was born about 1312 (daughter of Henry of Lancaster and Maud de Chaworth); died after 1345; was buried in Byland, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Abt 1349
    • Alternate death: 7 Jul 1349

    Notes:

    Also called Joan Plantagenet.

    Died of the plague.

    Children:
    1. 6. John Mowbray was born on 25 Jun 1340 in Epworth, Lincolnshire, England; died on 17 Jun 1368 in Thrace, near Constantinople; was buried in Church and Convent of St. Mary Draperis of Pera, Constantinople.

  6. 14.  John de Segrave was born on 4 May 1315 (son of Stephen de Segrave and Alice de Arundel); died on 20 Mar 1353; was buried in Chacombe Priory, Northamptonshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: of Segrave, Leicestershire, England
    • Alternate death: 1 Apr 1353, Bretby, Repton, Derbyshire, England

    John married Margaret Marshal in 1334. Margaret (daughter of Thomas of Brotherton and Alice de Hales) was born about 1322; died on 24 Mar 1399; was buried in Christ Church Greyfriars, Newgate, London, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  7. 15.  Margaret Marshal was born about 1322 (daughter of Thomas of Brotherton and Alice de Hales); died on 24 Mar 1399; was buried in Christ Church Greyfriars, Newgate, London, England.

    Other Events:

    • Buried: Charterhouse, Smithfield, London, England
    • Alternate death: 24 Mar 1400

    Notes:

    She was Countess of Norfolk by right. In 1338 she succeeded to the earldom of Norfolk as well, acquiring, by right of that title, the office of Earl Marshal of England. On 29 Sep 1397 she was created Duchess of Norfolk for life.

    Sometimes called "Lady Manny", presumably after her second husband. Also sometimes (albeit inaccurately) called "Margaret Plantagenet."

    Children:
    1. 7. Elizabeth de Segrave was born on 25 Oct 1338 in Croxton Abbey, Melton Mobray, Leicestershire, England; died between 1364 and 1368.