Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Simon II de Senlis

Male Abt 1103 - 1153  (~ 50 years)


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  • Name Simon II de Senlis  [1
    Born Abt 1103  [2
    Gender Male 
    Died Aug 1153  [2, 3, 4
    Buried St. Andrew's, Fife, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Person ID I10300  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others | Ancestor of DDB, Ancestors of JTS, Ancestor of TNH, Ancestor of TSW, Ancestor of TWK
    Last Modified 6 Jan 2018 

    Father Simon I de Senlis,   d. Abt 1111, La Charite-sur-Loire, Nievre, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother Maud of Northumberland,   b. Abt 1072,   d. 1130  (Age ~ 58 years) 
    Married Bef 1091  [5, 6, 7
    Family ID F6027  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Isabel of Leicester,   d. Aft 1190 
    Married Bef 1138  [2
    Children 
    +1. Isabel de Senlis,   d. Aft 1210
    Last Modified 2 Jul 2015 
    Family ID F2473  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton.

      From the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography:

      His career was complicated by rivalry with the Scottish royal house over the honour of Huntingdon, the inheritance of his mother, Maud. He was a minor when his father died between 1111 and 1113, and custody of the estate, with the rank of earl, passed to Maud's second husband, David, future king of Scots. Following Maud's death in 1131, by which date Senlis had reached his majority, King David remained in control, despite Senlis's demands for justice. King Stephen then recognized Henry, son of David and Maud, as earl of Huntingdon in 1136 and again in 1139; and although Senlis had probably held the honour and earldom during Henry's temporary forfeiture (January 1138 – April 1139), it was only on the final collapse of Stephen's Scottish diplomacy in the summer of 1141 that his claims were fully realized. His comital standing remains a source of much confusion. The argument that in 1136 Northampton was 'detached from the earldom of Huntingdon and made a separate earldom for Simon' is difficult to accept. (Some modern authorities have even seen him as an earl of Northumberland — he was never such.) His earliest known appearance as earl of Northampton occurs in 1138 or early in 1139; and the evidence suggests that 'Northampton' and 'Huntingdon' were alternative names for the same earldom, which normally, though not invariably, also embraced Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire. One of Stephen's foremost adherents, Senlis fought at the battle of Lincoln on 2 February 1141, and was a commander of the victorious royalist army at Winchester the following September. His comital authority extended over Northamptonshire, Huntingdonshire, and Bedfordshire, and within the first two shires he exercised regalian rights and assumed full responsibility for county government, clearly at Stephen's bidding. Jocelin of Furness's life of Abbot Waldef of Melrose, Senlis's younger brother, contains important information on his career and character. Henry of Huntingdon believed that he and Eustace, Stephen's eldest son, were the most uncompromising opponents of Henry Plantagenet in 1153, and that peace was possible only because of their sudden deaths. He was a major benefactor of numerous religious institutions, and founded a Cistercian abbey at Sawtry in 1146–7, as well as a Cluniac nunnery, Delapré Abbey. He married Isabella, or Elizabeth, daughter of Robert, earl of Leicester, and was Leicester's named ally in his famous treaty with the earl of Chester c. 1150. He and his wife, who as a widow married Gervase Paynel (d. 1194) of Dudley, had a son and at least one daughter: Simon (III) de Senlis (d. 1184), the last Senlis holder of the earldoms of Northampton and of Huntingdon, and Isabel, who married William Mauduit (d. 1194) of Hanslope. Simon (II) de Senlis died in August 1153 in Northampton and was buried in St Andrew's Priory, Northampton.

  • Sources 
    1. [S1206] J. Horace Round, "Mauduit of Hartley Mauduit." The Ancestor 5:207, April 1903.

    2. [S142] Royal Ancestry, by Douglas Richardson. Kimball G. Everingham, ed. 2013.

    3. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008., year only.

    4. [S128] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant. Full citation details here.

    5. [S142] Royal Ancestry, by Douglas Richardson. Kimball G. Everingham, ed. 2013., "in or before 1090".

    6. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008., "abt. 1090".

    7. [S128] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant. Full citation details here., "perhaps as early as 1090".