Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Patrick of Dunbar

Male Abt 1185 - Aft 1248  (~ 63 years)


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  • Name Patrick of Dunbar  [1, 2
    Born Abt 1185  [3, 4
    Gender Male 
    Alternate birth Abt 1186  [2
    Died Aft 14 Apr 1248  Marseilles, France Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Alternate death Between May 1248 and Dec 1248  Marseilles, France Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Alternate death Aft 28 Jun 1248  Marseilles, France Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 6, 7, 8
    Person ID I1078  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others | Ancestor of Barbara Hagan, Ancestor of JTS, Ancestor of TNH, Ancestor of TSW, Ancestor of TWK
    Last Modified 6 Jan 2018 

    Father Patrick of Dunbar,   b. 1152,   d. 31 Dec 1232  (Age 80 years) 
    Mother Ada of Scotland,   d. Bef 24 Sep 1200 
    Married 1184  [1, 2, 4, 9
    Family ID F1012  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Euphame de Brus,   d. Abt 1267 
    Married Bef 1213  [2
    Children 
    +1. Isabel of Dunbar,   d. Aft 1269
    Last Modified 31 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F325  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Earl of Dunbar. Died en route to Palestine.

      The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography says that "He and a number of other Scots died at the (successful) siege of Damietta in Egypt in 1248", but this appears to be an error. Volume III of The Scots Peerage (citation details below) says, on page 256, "[H]e never reached Palestine, as his death at Marseilles is recorded by the chronicler of Lanercost." And while the first portion of the chronicle of Lanercost appears to be online only in its original Latin, I can certainly make out in its 1248 section that "Patricius de Dunbar" "ex hac luce migravit" ("departed this life") in "Marfiliam."

      From The Scots Peerage:

      "The same writer [presumably the Lanercost chronicler] tells also two stories which give us a very favorable view of the Earl's character. One is that the Earl had issued invitations for a feast, but many more guests arrived than preparation had been made for. When his steward informed him of the lack of provision thus caused, the Earl ordered the kitchen be set on fire, risking rather the loss of his house than the tarnishing of his reputation for hospitality. The other story, for which the narrator vouches, concerns his forgiving and lenient conduct to a robber whom he had rescued from the gallows and placed in a position of trust, but who tried to murder his master. The Earl, however, made light of it, and gave the rascal money to escape."

  • Sources 
    1. [S142] Royal Ancestry, by Douglas Richardson. Kimball G. Everingham, ed. 2013.

    2. [S76] The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2004-ongoing).

    3. [S801] John P. Ravilious, 5 Aug 2006, post to soc.genealogy.medieval.

    4. [S802] Andrew B. W. MacEwen, "A Clarification of the Dunbar Pedigree." The Genealogist 9:229, Fall 1998.

    5. [S128] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant. Full citation details here.

    6. [S800] The Scots Peerage, Founded on Wood's Edition of Sir Robert Douglas's Peerage of Scotland, Containing an Historical and Genealogical Account of the Nobility of That Kingdom. Ed. James Balfour Paul. Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1904-1914., year and place only.

    7. [S789] The Wallop Family and Their Ancestry, by Vernon James Watney. Oxford, 1928., year and place only.

    8. [S802] Andrew B. W. MacEwen, "A Clarification of the Dunbar Pedigree." The Genealogist 9:229, Fall 1998., "[I]n the latter half of 1248.".

    9. [S800] The Scots Peerage, Founded on Wood's Edition of Sir Robert Douglas's Peerage of Scotland, Containing an Historical and Genealogical Account of the Nobility of That Kingdom. Ed. James Balfour Paul. Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1904-1914.