Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Capt. Thomas Savage

Male Abt 1607 - 1682  (~ 75 years)


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Capt. Thomas Savage  [1
    Born Abt 1607  [2, 3
    Gender Male 
    Died 15 Feb 1682  Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3
    Person ID I15613  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others | Ancestor of TSW
    Last Modified 4 Jul 2018 

    Family 1 Faith Hutchinson,   b. Bef 14 Aug 1617, Alford, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Feb 1652, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 34 years) 
    Married 1637  Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Last Modified 4 Jul 2018 
    Family ID F9601  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Mary Symmes,   b. 9 Apr 1628, Dunstable, Bedfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Jul 1710, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years) 
    Married 15 Sep 1652  Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3
    Children 
    +1. Sarah Savage,   b. 25 Jun 1653, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 26 Jun 1713  (Age < 60 years)
    Last Modified 4 Jul 2018 
    Family ID F9549  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • He arrived in 1635 on the Planter. His specific origins are unknown. The 19th-century genealogist James Savage gave his father as one William Savage, blacksmith of Taunton, Somerset, but he gave no proof. Thomas Savage's tomb, in the cemetery now adjoining King's Chapel in Boston, displays the arms of the Savages of Rocksavage in Clifton, Cheshire; whether this reflects a true genealogical relationship is unknown.

      From The Ancestry of Reverend Henry Whitfield (citation details below):

      In the January following his arrival, Thomas Savage was admitted to the church in Boston. In the following month, he was given seven acres of marsh ground at Muddy River, now Brookline, Massachusetts, "for keeping of his cattle (being in number, five)" and on 25 May 1636 he was made a freeman of the town of Boston, upon whose records his name appears with frequency during the remainder of his life. In the religious controversy in which his mother-in-law, the famous Anne Hutchinson, became involved, Savage was one of her adherants, and previous to her trial, he was disarmed and obliged to leave Boston, as he apparently did in 1637. With William Coddington, William Hutchinson, and others, Savage bought Aquidneck from the Indians, and began the settlement of Rhode Island. Soon after his arrival at Aquidneck, Savage recanted and was allowed to return to Boston, probably as early as June 1638. In 1637, he became a member of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Boston, where his name stands forth on the roll of membership. In 1651 he succeeded Captain Robert Keayne as Captain of the Company, holding this position in 1659, 1668, 1675 and 1680. In 1651 and 1652, he was the Recorder of Boston, and a Selectman in 1652. On 12 March 1653/4, Savage, with one other, was chosen to represent Boston in the General Court, holding that position until 1657. He was again a representative from 1659 to 1662, and in 1677 and 1678, and held the office of Assistant from 1680 until his death. In 1669, he was one of the founders and members of the Third (Old South) Church, and was a generous contributor toward establishing a free school in Boston. In 1673, he, with others, erected a barricade in Boston harbor for protection against an expected attack upon Boston by the Dutch. This barricade eventually grew into Long Wharf, portions of which have ever since been owned by some of his descendants. In 1675, at the beginning of King Philip's War, Savage was appointed to the chief command of the Massachusetts forces, Denison, the major-general, being prevented by illness from participating, and on 28 June he set out upon the campaign at the head of a force numbering 300 men. Upon their arrival at the Wampanoag country in the northeastern part of Rhode Island, they found that Philip and his forces had fled. Peace being soon declared, Savage and his men returned to Boston, where the army was disbanded. Philip, however, soon resumed the war, and in the spring of 1676 Savage was once more placed at the head of the Massachusetts troops and acquitted himself with distinction during the remainder of the war.

      According to the Book of Possessions, Savage's house and garden were on the north side of the present Bennet Street and near Scarlet's Wharf, where afterwards stood the King's Head Tavern. At the same time, he was the owner of a farm in Braintree, containing about 65 acres, 26 acres of which he sold early to James Everill of Boston. He afterwards increased his holdings in Braintree to nearly 2500 acres. In 1656, Savage built a new house "between the drawbridge and the conduit" on the southerly side of the present North Street, near Dock Square, on land which he had bought two years earlier for £130. In the deed of this purchase, he is called a merchant. His shop stood on what is now the easterly corner of Washington Street and Adams Square. He also had an interest in the Saugus Iron Works as numerous county records show.

  • Sources 
    1. [S2122] Descendants of the Reverend Francis Higginson by Thomas Wentworth Higginson. 1910.

    2. [S2123] The Ancestry of Reverend Henry Whitfield (1590-1657) and His Wife Dorothy Sheafe (159?-1669) of Guilford, Connecticut by John Brooks Threlfall. Madison, Wisconsin: 1989.

    3. [S101] The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633, Volumes 1-3 and The Great Migration: Immigrants to New England,1634-1635, Volumes 1-7, by Robert Charles Anderson. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1996-2011.