Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Welcome Arnold

Male 1745 - 1798  (53 years)


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Welcome Arnold  [1
    Born 24 Mar 1745  [2, 3
    Gender Male 
    Alternate birth 25 Mar 1745  [4
    Died 29 Sep 1798  [2, 3
    Person ID I16251  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others
    Last Modified 19 Nov 2017 

    Father Jonathan Arnold,   b. 18 Nov 1708, Providence, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Dec 1796, Smithfield, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years) 
    Mother Abigail Smith,   b. 10 Jun 1714,   d. 29 Jun 1801, Smithfield, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years) 
    Family ID F10177  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Patience Greene,   b. 13 May 1754, East Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Nov 1809, Providence, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 55 years) 
    Married 11 Feb 1773  [4
    Children 
     1. Eliza Harriet Arnold,   b. 5 Oct 1796, Providence, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Aug 1873  (Age 76 years)
    Last Modified 19 Nov 2017 
    Family ID F10174  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • "[A] well-known Providence merchant who had participated in the Gaspee Affair in 1772." [Wikipedia]

      Also from Wikipedia:

      The Gaspee Affair was a very significant event in the lead-up to the American Revolution. HMS Gaspee was a British customs schooner that had been enforcing the Navigation Acts in and around Newport, Rhode Island in 1772. It ran aground in shallow water while chasing the packet ship Hannah on June 9 near what is now known as Gaspee Point in Warwick, Rhode Island. A group of men led by Abraham Whipple and John Brown attacked, boarded, and torched the ship.

      The event increased hostilities between the American colonists and British officials, following the Boston Massacre in 1770. The British had hoped to reduce tensions with the colonies by repealing some aspects of the Townshend Acts and working to end the American boycott of British goods. British officials in Rhode Island wanted to increase their control over the trade that had defined the small colony—legitimate trade as well as smuggling—in order to increase their revenue from the colony. But colonists increasingly began to protest the Stamp Act, Townshend Acts, and other British impositions that had clashed with the colony's history of rum manufacturing, maritime trade, and slave trading.

      This event marked the first act of violent uprising against the authority of the British crown in America, preceding the Boston tea party by more than a year and moving the colonies as a whole toward the war for independence.

  • Sources 
    1. [S1658] Vital Records of Rhode Island, 1636-1850: First Series, Births, Marriages, and Deaths, by James N. Arnold. Narragansett Historical Publishing Co., 1891.

    2. [S1713] Find a Grave page for Welcome Arnold.

    3. [S1662] North by South: The Two Lives of Richard James Arnold, by Charles Hoffman and Tess Hoffman. Athens, Georgia: The University of Georgia Press, 1988., year only.

    4. [S1615] The Greenes of Rhode Island, with Historical Records of English Ancestry, by George Sears Greene. New York: The Knickerbocker Press, 1903.