Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Humphrey Stafford

Male 1427 - 1486  (~ 60 years)


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  • Name Humphrey Stafford 
    Born Between 1426 and 1427  of Grafton, Worcestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Died 8 Jul 1486  Tyburn Elms, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Church of the Grey Friars, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID I18724  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others | Ancestor of Barbara Hagan, Ancestor of JTS
    Last Modified 10 Nov 2017 

    Father Humphrey Stafford,   b. 1400, of Grafton, Worcestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Jun 1450, Sevenoaks, Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 50 years) 
    Mother Eleanor Aylesbury,   b. Abt 1406,   d. Aft 1475  (Age ~ 70 years) 
    Married Aft 2 Jan 1424  [1
    Family ID F11653  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Katherine Fray,   b. Abt 1447,   d. 12 May 1482  (Age ~ 35 years) 
    Married Aft 1462  [1
    Children 
    +1. Anne Stafford,   bur. Well, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
    +2. Humphrey Stafford,   b. 1 May 1478, of Cotered, Hertfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Sep 1545  (Age 67 years)
    Last Modified 28 Aug 2019 
    Family ID F11616  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • From Wikipedia:

      Sir Humphrey Stafford, and his brother Thomas Stafford, joined by Francis Lovell, 1st Viscount Lovell, led the inauspicious Stafford and Lovell Rebellion in 1486.

      The conspirators hoped to restore the Yorkist monarchy. While Lord Lovell went to Yorkshire, the brothers Stafford went to the Midlands. On 23 April 1486, after a failed attempt to seize Henry VII in York, Lord Lovell escaped to Burgundy. In the meantime, the Stafford brothers's rebellion in Worcester had failed, in part due to lack of planning and in part due to the fact that King Henry had some support in that area.

      During this time Henry was on a nationwide tour of the country. As soon as he advanced towards Worcester in order to eliminate Yorkist support, on 11 May 1486 the Stafford brothers again fled to sanctuary, this time at Culham.

      Despite the fact that Stafford had sought sanctuary at the church in Culham, King Henry VII decided to force Stafford to kiss his feet. Stafford was forcibly removed from his sanctuary on the night of 13 May by John Barrowman and one follower. Henry then ordered the execution of Humphrey Stafford of Grafton, but pardoned the younger Thomas Stafford.

      The arrest prompted a series of protests to Pope Innocent VIII over the breaking of sanctuary; these resulted in a Papal bull in August which severely limited the rights of sanctuary, excluding it completely in cases of treason, thereby vindicating the King's actions.

      Humphrey was executed at Tyburn on 8 July 1486.

  • Sources 
    1. [S142] Royal Ancestry, by Douglas Richardson. Kimball G. Everingham, ed. 2013.