Nielsen Hayden genealogy

St. Ida of Verdun

Female Abt 1040 - 1113  (~ 73 years)


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  • Name St. Ida of Verdun  [1
    Born Abt 1040  [2
    Gender Female 
    Died 13 Aug 1113  [3, 4, 5
    Person ID I1874  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others | Ancestor of Barbara Hagan, Ancestor of DDB, Ancestor of JTS, Ancestor of TNH, Ancestor of TSW, Ancestor of TWK
    Last Modified 6 Jan 2018 

    Father Godfrey "The Bearded",   b. Abt 997,   d. 24 Dec 1069  (Age ~ 72 years) 
    Mother Doda,   d. Bef 1053 
    Family ID F2025  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Eustache II of Boulogne,   d. Abt 1080 
    Married 1057  [4, 5
    Children 
    +1. Eustache III of Boulogne,   d. Aft 1125
    Last Modified 10 Jan 2016 
    Family ID F893  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Also called Ida of Lorraine; Ida of Bouillon.

      From The Lives of the Saints, by Omer Englebert:

      A daughter of the duke of Lorraine, Ida was married at the age of seventeen to Eustace II, count of Boulogne, like herself a descendant of Charlemagne. Among her numerous children a daughter became the wife of Henry IV, emperor of Germany, who, as is known, had to make honourable amends to the pope at Canossa.

      Of her three sons the most celebrated is Godfrey, duke of Bouillon, who fought Gregory VII at his brother-in-law's side, then sold his duchy to go on the crusades and, after a series of exploits, was proclaimed king of Jerusalem in 1099. When he died the next year, his brother Baldwin succeeded him.

      The Countess Ida had as her spiritual director St. Anselm, then abbot of Bec in Normandy. He sometimes visited her in Boulogne, and also wrote her edifying letters in which he sometimes calls her his "well-beloved sister," and sometimes his "very dear daughter in Jesus Christ."

      Ida was humble and practised mortification and charity in proportion to her considerable wealth. Her favourite occupation was making fine ornaments for altars. After the death of her husband, with whom she was always on good terms, she consecrated all her disposable goods to found and endow religious establishments.

  • Sources 
    1. [S850] Todd A. Farmerie, 13 Mar 2001, post to soc.genealogy.medieval.

    2. [S407] The Lives of the Saints, by Omer Englebert. David McKay, 1951.

    3. [S407] The Lives of the Saints, by Omer Englebert. David McKay, 1951., year only.

    4. [S142] Royal Ancestry, by Douglas Richardson. Kimball G. Everingham, ed. 2013.

    5. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008.