Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Rev. Edward Bulkeley

Male Bef 1614 - 1696  (> 81 years)


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  • Name Rev. Edward Bulkeley 
    Born Bef 12 Jun 1614  [1, 2
    Gender Male 
    Baptised 12 Jun 1614  Odell, Bedfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Died 2 Jan 1696  Chelmsford, Middlesex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Buried Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Person ID I20988  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others
    Last Modified 24 Jan 2019 

    Father Rev. Peter Bulkeley,   b. 31 Jan 1583, Odell, Bedfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Mar 1659, Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years) 
    Mother Jane Allen,   b. Bef 13 Jan 1588,   d. Bef 8 Dec 1626  (Age < 38 years) 
    Married 12 Apr 1613  Goldington, Bedfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Family ID F12484  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Lucian,   d. Aft 28 Jan 1679 
    Children 
     1. Peter Bulkeley,   b. 3 Jan 1641, Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 May 1688, Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 47 years)
    Last Modified 22 Dec 2018 
    Family ID F12485  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Arriving in 1634, he was the first of the extensive Bulkeley family to come to New England.

      Matriculated pensioner from St. Catharine's College, Cambridge, Easter 1629, he studied with the Rev. Cotton in New England while boarding at his house. He was ordained in Marshfield in 1643. After fifteen years as the minister there, he was installed as his father's successor at Concord in 1659, and remained there for 53 years.

      He is said to have been disabled in some manner ("lame and of a feeble constitution"). Of his preaching style, Grindall Reynolds had this to say in 1896:
      One production of Mr. Bulkeley has escaped the tooth of time, -- his sermon delivered after the return of Captain Thomas Wheeler from Brookfield fight. It was a time to stir a man's soul. The whole Colony was convulsed. Every frontier settlement and every lonely farmhouse was in peril. Two of his parishioners had been slain. Two more came home so shattered that they lingered only a few months. The lot of these might any hour be the lot of his hearers. You read the sermon through from text to conclusion. There is not one throb of pathos in it. You cannot find an eloquent line, hardly an impressive sentence. It is a maze of Inquisitions and Instructions, of Applications and Uses, of Doctrines and Reasons, of Motives and Improvements, wherein the mind wanders and is lost. How could a tender human heart help breaking through the meshes of formality? And how was it possible for men, of rude speech possibly, but of strong and hot sympathies, to admire or approve such stiff and measured utterance?

      With so little to guide it is not possible to speak confidently. Still this is certain. The younger Bulkeley has not left behind the impression of power which his father did. Apparently he had not his vigorous personality, his culture, or his great heart. Mather calls him "the worthy son" of a worthy sire. Clearly he was that. An honest, faithful, and devout man. But with all his real excellence one who did not rise much above mediocrity.
      [From A Collection of Historical and Other Papers, Concord, Massachusetts, 1896.]

  • Sources 
    1. [S317] The Bulkeley Genealogy, by Donald Lines Jacobus. New Haven, Connecticut: 1933.

    2. [S756] Early New England Families, 1641-1700, by Alicia Crane Williams. Online database, New England Historic Genealogical Society.