Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Alfonso IX, King of León and Galicia

Male 1171 - 1230  (59 years)


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  • Name Alfonso IX  
    Suffix King of León and Galicia 
    Alternate birth 1166  [1, 2
    Born 15 Aug 1171  Zamora, León, Spain Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 3, 4, 5, 6
    Gender Male 
    Died 24 Sep 1230  Villanueva de Sarria, Spain Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
    Buried Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 5
    Person ID I2413  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others | Ancestor of DDB, Ancestors of JTS, Ancestor of TNH, Ancestor of TSW, Ancestor of TWK
    Last Modified 4 Sep 2018 

    Father Fernando II, King of Leon, Galicia, and Extremadura,   b. 1137,   d. 22 Jan 1188, Benavente, Italy Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 51 years) 
    Mother Urraca of Portugal,   b. Abt 1150,   d. 16 Oct 1188, Bamba, near Valladolid, Castile, Spain Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 38 years) 
    Married 1165  [1, 4, 5
    Annulled Jun 1175  [1, 4, 5
    Family ID F2662  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Berenguela I of Castile, Queen Of Castile & Toledo,   b. 1171,   d. 8 Nov 1244  (Age 73 years) 
    Married Bef 17 Dec 1197  Valladolid, Castile, Spain Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 6, 10, 11
    Annulled Bef 19 Jun 1204  [4, 7, 12
    Notes 
    • Annulled by Pope Innocent III on grounds of consanguinity.
    Children 
    +1. Fernando III (St. Fernando), King Of Castile, León, Galicia, Toledo, Córdoba, Jaén, and Seville,   b. Between 5 Aug 1201 and 19 Aug 1201, En route between Salamanca and Zamora Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 May 1252, Seville, Andalusia, Spain Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 50 years)
    +2. Alfonso,   b. Between 1203 and 1204,   d. 6 Jan 1272, Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 69 years)
    +3. Bérenguère of Castile-León,   b. 1204,   d. 12 Apr 1237, Constantinople Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 33 years)
    Last Modified 7 Jun 2019 
    Family ID F3770  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Called "el Barboso," "the Slobberer," supposedly because he was subject to fits of rage during which he foamed at the mouth. Despite this, he is also notable for having founded the University of Salamanca and for convening what was arguably the first parliament in Western Europe that included representatives of the urban bourgeoisie. Our theory is that he was a marooned time-traveler from the future: if you found yourself stuck in twelfth-century Spain, you'd foam at the mouth once in a while too.

      From Wikipedia:

      In spite of the democratic precedent represented by the Cortes and the founding of the University of Salamanca, Alfonso is often chiefly remembered for the difficulties his successive marriages caused between him with Pope Celestine III. He was first married in 1191 to his first cousin, Theresa of Portugal, who bore him two daughters, and a son who died young. The marriage was declared null by the papal legate Cardinal Gregory for consanguinity.

      After Alfonso VIII of Castile was defeated at the Battle of Alarcos, Alfonso IX invaded Castile with the aid of Muslim troops. He was summarily excommunicated by Pope Celestine III. In 1197, Alfonso IX married his first cousin once removed, Berengaria of Castile, to cement peace between León and Castile. For this second act of consanguinity, the king and the kingdom were placed under interdict by representatives of the Pope. In 1198, Pope Innocent III declared Alfonso and Berengaria's marriage invalid, but they stayed together until 1204. The annulment of this marriage by the pope drove the younger Alfonso to again attack his cousin in 1204, but treaties made in 1205, 1207, and 1209 each forced him to concede further territories and rights. The treaty in 1207 is the first existing public document in the Castilian dialect.

      The Pope was, however, compelled to modify his measures by the threat that, if the people could not obtain the services of religion, they would not support the clergy, and that heresy would spread. The king was left under interdict personally, but to that he showed himself indifferent, and he had the support of his clergy. Berengaria left him after the birth of five children, and the king then returned to Theresa, to whose daughters he left his kingdom in his will.

  • Sources 
    1. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008.

    2. [S849] G. Andrews Moriarty, "The Plantagenet Descent from the Cid." The New England Historical and Genealogical Register 117:94, April 1963.

    3. [S142] Royal Ancestry, by Douglas Richardson. Kimball G. Everingham, ed. 2013.

    4. [S858] Szabolcs de Vajay, "From Alfonso VII to Alfonso X: The First Two Centuries of the Burgundian Dynasty in Castile and Leon -- A Prosopographical Catalogue in Social Genealogy, 1100-1300." Studies in Genealogy and Family History in Tribute to Charles Evans on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, ed. Lindsay L. Brook. Salt Lake City: Association for the Promotion of Scholarship in Genealogy, 1989.

    5. [S1526] The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, Wife of Reverend John Owsley, Generations 1-15, Fourth Preliminary Edition by Ronny O. Bodine and Bro. Thomas Spalding, Jr. 2013.

    6. [S2172] Donald Lines Jacobus, "Descents from the Cid." The American Genealogist 9:99, 1932., year only.

    7. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008., year only.

    8. [S341] Nathaniel L. Taylor, "Cassandra Elizabeth Taylor's royal descents.", year only.

    9. [S849] G. Andrews Moriarty, "The Plantagenet Descent from the Cid." The New England Historical and Genealogical Register 117:94, April 1963., date only.

    10. [S142] Royal Ancestry, by Douglas Richardson. Kimball G. Everingham, ed. 2013., month, year, and place only.

    11. [S1526] The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, Wife of Reverend John Owsley, Generations 1-15, Fourth Preliminary Edition by Ronny O. Bodine and Bro. Thomas Spalding, Jr. 2013., month, year, and place only.

    12. [S1526] The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, Wife of Reverend John Owsley, Generations 1-15, Fourth Preliminary Edition by Ronny O. Bodine and Bro. Thomas Spalding, Jr. 2013., year only.