Nielsen Hayden genealogy

William d'Aubeney

Male Aft 1146 - 1236  (< 88 years)


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  • Name William d'Aubeney 
    Born Aft 1146  of Belvoir, Leicestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3
    Gender Male 
    Alternate death 1 May 1236  [2, 4
    Died 7 May 1236  [1, 5, 6
    Alternate death 1 May 1238  Uffington, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Buried Newstead, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 3
    Person ID I2865  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others | Ancestor of Barbara Hagan, Ancestor of DDB, Ancestor of JTS, Ancestor of TNH, Ancestor of TSW, Ancestor of TWK
    Last Modified 22 Dec 2019 

    Father William II d'Aubeney,   b. of Belvoir, Leicestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1167 
    Mother Maud de Senlis,   b. Abt 1125,   d. Aft 1185  (Age ~ 61 years) 
    Family ID F4501  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Margary de Umfreville,   d. Bef 1198 
    Children 
    +1. William IV d'Aubeney,   b. of Belvoir, Leicestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Sep 1242
    Last Modified 6 Apr 2020 
    Family ID F1044  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Magna Carta surety. Sheriff of Rutland 1195; Sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire 1197; Sheriff of Warwickshire and Leicestershire 1197; Governor of Rochester Castle. He was buried at Newstead, but his heart was interred at Belvoir Priory, Leicestershire.

      From Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans (citation details below):

      Having been forced to give his son to King John as a hostage in 1201, he was a member of the moderate or middle section of the baronage in the conflict between King John and the barons, remaining in attendance on the king until going over to the extreme party upon their taking possession of London on 24 May 1215. Going with them to Runnymede, he was elected a Magna Carta surety in 1215, and then withdrew to Belvoir. Although he was excommunicated by name by the Pope, along with de Quency and Mowbray, as a result of Runnymede, he refused to attend the Hounslow tournament on 6 July 1215.

      He was prevailed upon to return to service in the fall, and was placed in charge of Rochester, but was forced to surrender it to John after a gallant defense lasting from 11 Oct. to 30 Nov. 1215, and was thrown into prison, narrowly escaping hanging.

      In 1216, upon payment of a fine of 6,000 marks [£4000], he was released and regained his lands. He did homage to King Henry III, was entrusted with Sleaford Castle and a command at the battle of Lincoln of 19 May 1217, which earned him high favor. In 1219 and 1225 he served again as an itinerant justice.

  • Sources 
    1. [S142] Royal Ancestry by Douglas Richardson. Kimball G. Everingham, ed. 2013.

    2. [S53] The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215: The Barons Named in the Magna Charta, 1215, and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America During the Early Colonial Years by Frederick Lewis Weis. Fifth edition, with additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and William R. Beal. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1999.

    3. [S3215] Medieval Welsh Ancestors of Certain Americans by Carl Boyer III. Santa Clarita, California, 2004.

    4. [S2780] Early Yorkshire Charters: Volume 1, edited by William Farrer. Edinburgh: Ballantyne, Hanson & Co., 1914., year only.

    5. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008., year only.

    6. [S789] The Wallop Family and Their Ancestry by Vernon James Watney. Oxford, 1928., month and year only.