Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Rev. James Noyes

Male 1640 - 1719  (79 years)


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  • Name James Noyes 
    Prefix Rev. 
    Born 11 Mar 1640  Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Gender Male 
    Died 30 Dec 1719  Stonington, New London, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 6
    Buried Wequetequock Burial Ground, Stonington, New London, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Person ID I335  Nielsen Hayden genealogy
    Last Modified 14 Feb 2016 

    Father Rev. James Noyes,   b. 22 Oct 1608, Cholderton, Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Oct 1656, Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 48 years) 
    Mother Sarah Browne,   b. Abt 1610,   d. 13 Sep 1691, Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 81 years) 
    Married 21 Mar 1634  Romsey, Hampshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 7, 8
    Family ID F3526  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Dorothy Stanton,   b. 1651, Stonington, New London, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Jan 1743, Stonington, New London, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 92 years) 
    Married 11 Sep 1674  Stonington, New London, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location  [6, 9, 10, 11
    Children 
    +1. Deacon John Noyes,   b. 3 Jun 1685,   d. 17 Sep 1751, Stonington, New London, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
    Last Modified 28 Apr 2017 10:44:05 
    Family ID F4019  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • "Graduated at Harvard College and was ordained as pastor of the Congregational church in Stonington the day before his marriage. He was ordained 10 September 1674. He was associated with the First church from 1665-1719. He was a chaplain, 1676, in King Philip's War; Commissioner on Boundary with Rhode Island, 1699 and 1701. He was one of the trustees mentioned in the Act of 1701 that established Yale and was a Fellow of Yale 1700-1719." [Stanton Genealogy Database, citation details below]

      Anderson, Great Migration, confirms Harvard College 1659.

      "The Reverend James Noyes resided with the family of Thomas Stanton, Sr., until ordained 11 September 1674. The following day Rev. Noyes married Miss Dorothy Stanton, daughter of Thomas and Ann (Lord) Stanton. Rev. James Noyes was chaplain with Captain George Denison's expedition that captured Canonchet, Chief sachem of the Narragansett Indians, April 1676." [From http://www.werelate.org/wiki/Person:James_Noyes_%282%29, quoting It's About Time: Chronological, Historical, and Genealogical Research Notes on Some of the Maternal Ancestors and Descendants of America (Spilman) Mears (1846-1935), compiled by William L. Decoursey.] Another participant in that expedition was Capt. James Pendleton, a 10X-great grandfather of TNH, who was also present at the Rev. Noyes's ordination on 10 (or 11) Sep 1674. In Everett Hall Pendleton's 1956 volume Early New England Pendletons, With Some Account of the Three Groups who Took the Name Pembleton, and Notices of Other Pendletons of Later Origin in the United States, we read about the aftermath of that expedition: "While [Pendleton] seems to have had something substantial out of this adventure, his spiritual advisor, the Rev. James Noyes, of Stonington, was not so fortunate. Six months later he sent a long and rambling letter of complaint to John Allyn, the colony's secretary at Hartford, alleging that although he had been engaged 'three times in the warr service' he had received no compensation whatever, either in money or in prisoners. And he seemed particularly annoyed that some captive girl of fourteen years had not been sent him as requested, such a prize, no doubt, commanding a premium in the slave market."

      Also from http://www.werelate.org/wiki/Person:James_Noyes_%282%29:

      The First Congregational Church (later called the Old Road Church) of Stonington, Connecticut was established, 3 June 1674, with nine members: Rev. James Noyes, Thomas Stanton, Sr., Thomas Stanton, Jr., Nathaniel Chesebrough, Thomas Miner and his son Ephraim Miner, the brothers Nehemiah and Moses Palmer, and Thomas Wheeler. Thomas Miner was the first deacon.

      The pier slab that for over a century has been over the grave of Rev. James Noyes of the old Wetequequock burying ground, Stonington, Conn., was relettered at Doty's marble works in the 1890s. The following is the inscription on it

      "In expectation of a joyful resurrection to eternal life here lyeth interred the body of the Rev. Mr. James Noyes aged 80 years who after a faithful living of the Church of Christ in this place for more than 55 years deceased Dec. ye 30, 1719-20. Majesty, meekness and humility here meet in one with greatest charity. He was first pastor of the Road Church and Society."

  • Sources 
    1. [S541] A Record, Genealogical, Biographical, Statistical, of Thomas Stanton, of Connecticut, and his Descendents, 1635-1891, by William A. Stanton. Albany, NY: J. Munsell, 1891.

    2. [S542] Stanton Genealogy Database, compiled by Brian Bonner.

    3. [S101] The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633, Volumes 1-3 and The Great Migration: Immigrants to New England,1634-1635, Volumes 1-6, by Robert Charles Anderson. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1996-2011.

    4. [S544] Noyes-Gilman Ancestry: Being a Series of Sketches, with a Chart of the Ancestors of Charles Phelps Noyes and Emily H. (Gilman) Noyes, His Wife, by Charles Phelps Noyes. St. Paul, Minnesota, 1907.

    5. [S758] Dean Crawford Smith and Paul C. Reed, "Four Generations of Ancestry for the Noyes Families of New England." The New England Historical and Genealogical Register 149:105, April 1995.

    6. [S1051] History of Wallingford, Connecticut from its Settlement in 1670 to the Present Time by Charles Henry Stanley Davis, M.D. Meriden, Connecticut: 1870.

    7. [S545] Magnalia Christi Americana: The Ecclesiastical History of New England, by Cotton Mather. London: Thomas Parkhurst, 1702., "England" only.

    8. [S758] Dean Crawford Smith and Paul C. Reed, "Four Generations of Ancestry for the Noyes Families of New England." The New England Historical and Genealogical Register 149:105, April 1995., says "about 1633".

    9. [S541] A Record, Genealogical, Biographical, Statistical, of Thomas Stanton, of Connecticut, and his Descendents, 1635-1891, by William A. Stanton. Albany, NY: J. Munsell, 1891., date only.

    10. [S101] The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633, Volumes 1-3 and The Great Migration: Immigrants to New England,1634-1635, Volumes 1-6, by Robert Charles Anderson. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1996-2011., date only.

    11. [S543] Genealogy of the Descendants of Thomas Lord, an Original Proprietor and Founder of Hartford, Conn., in 1636, by Kenneth Lord. New York, 1946.