Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Sarah Thompson

Sarah Thompson

Female 1820 - 1896  (75 years)

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  • Name Sarah Thompson  [1
    Born 20 Mar 1820  Pomfret, Chautauqua, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Female 
    Died 31 Jan 1896  Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Person ID I5074  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others | Ancestor of TNH
    Last Modified 6 Oct 2015 

    Father David John Thompson,   b. Abt 1771, Pelham, Hampshire, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aug 1823, Fredonia, Chautauqua, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 52 years) 
    Mother Leah Lewis,   b. 7 May 1787, New Ashford, Berkshire, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Nov 1843, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 56 years) 
    Married Abt 1812  [2, 3
    Family ID F996  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Morris Charles Phelps,   b. 20 Dec 1805, Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 May 1876, Montpelier, Bear Lake, Idaho Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years) 
    Married 27 Mar 1842  Hancock, Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 5
    Children 
    +1. Hyrum Smith Phelps,   b. 26 Feb 1846, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Apr 1926, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
    Last Modified 9 Dec 2018 
    Family ID F3365  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Sarah Thompson
    Sarah Thompson

  • Notes 
    • Allegedly she and her mother Leah Lewis were founding members of the Relief Society when it was organized on 17 Mar 1842, but neither of them is mentioned in Wikipedia's coverage of that first meeting.

      From Sarah Thompson Phelps, a memoir by her granddaughter Barbara Ann Phelps Allen:

      Grandma was born March 20, 1820. Her parents were James and Leah Lewis Thompson. When she was four years old, her father died leaving her mother with seven small children, making it necessary for her to start out early in life making her own way. In spite of poverty, she succeeded in acquiring sufficient education to be able to teach school.

      When she was eleven years old, the gospel came into their home. She, together with her mother and other members of the family except one brother, joined and were baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. After they joined, their friends turned against them, and from then on their trials began. They were driven from place to place and finally forced to flee to the Rocky Mountains. She was brave and courageous as a young woman.

      She taught school when she was a young woman. It was customary for teachers to board among the homes of their pupils, which she did, and in doing so she learned many of the plots and schemes of the mobs to assassinate the Saints. She kept the saints posted, and when the final plot came for the general roundup of the saints, she made a dash on horseback to give the alarm to her people. She was followed for five miles one time, but her horse being fastest, she made her escape. Another time when she was teaching, she went to a home to collect her pay, and the people refused to pay. They said their intentions were to drive all the Mormons out and take the crops that they had recently harvested. She told them what she thought of them. While she was speaking, a voice came to her telling her to leave the next morning as soon as she arose. She did, and as she was leaving, she saw the mob coming and they tried to kill her.

      At the time of Haun's Mill Massacre, she lived but a few miles from the mill on the creek; some of those who were fortunate enough to get away came to her home. While the mob was going through the country, they crossed the creek where Grandma and all the women were washing clothes. She told many times how they looked, saying they had their faces painted and were disguised in every imaginable way. Some of the women were so frightened, they fainted, but grandma shouted, "Hooray for the captain!" Two of the men rode up to her and asked if she wasn't afraid of them. She said she hadn't been raised in the woods to be afraid of owls. They asked her if she didn't recognize them, and she said she did not. They told her she should, they were her old neighbors. She then asked them what they intended to do, and one replied, "Kill everyone on the creek." Grandma asked what they had done that they should be killed. Their reply was they did not know, they were only obeying orders. On two different occasions, she was chased by a mob who tried to shoot her, but their guns refused to go off.

      One time when they had been driven from their home, she said they had traveled all day in the rain driving their cattle. She had on a sunbonnet that was quilted so that cardboard slats could be inserted. The rain had dissolved the slats, and the front of her bonnet flopped in her face. She was soaked to the skin, weary and tired after plodding the mud all day. As they were passing a farm house, a lady saw her and invited her into her home to dry her clothes and get warm. She was taken into the parlor by the fireplace. There were two young ladies and their boy friends sitting there, and when they saw grandma they burst out laughing. She said she was nearly in tears; she looked them in the eye and said, "You must have been born in the woods."

  • Sources 
    1. [S124] Hyrum Smith Phelps, "Autobiography of Hyrum Smith Phelps.".

    2. [S564] History of Leah Lewis, by Murland R. Packer.

    3. [S714] Findagrave.com page for Leah Lewis Simmons Thompson Childs.

    4. [S1042] Illinois Marriages to 1850 by Jordan Dodd, on Ancestry.com.

    5. [S1252] Findagrave.com page for Morris Charles Phelps.