Nielsen Hayden genealogy

David I, King of Scotland

Male Abt 1080 - 1153  (~ 73 years)


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name David I  
    Suffix King of Scotland 
    Born Abt 1080  [1, 2
    Gender Male 
    Alternate birth Abt 1085  [3, 4
    Died 24 May 1153  Carlisle, Cumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3, 4
    Buried Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 3, 4
    Person ID I6369  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others
    Last Modified 6 Jan 2018 

    Father Malcolm III Canmore, King of Scotland (Alba),   b. Between 1030 and 1035,   d. 13 Nov 1093, Alnwick, Northumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 63 years) 
    Mother St. Margaret of Scotland,   b. Abt 1050,   d. 16 Nov 1093, Edinburgh Castle, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 43 years) 
    Married 1068-1069  Dumferline, Fife, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3
    Family ID F3159  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Maud of Northumberland,   b. Abt 1072,   d. 1130  (Age ~ 58 years) 
    Married Bef Jul 1113  [3, 5, 6
    Children 
    +1. Henry of Scotland,   b. Abt 1114,   d. 12 Jun 1152  (Age ~ 38 years)
    Last Modified 19 Jun 2018 11:32:40 
    Family ID F5533  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • "David I was driven by a clear and consistent vision, pious and authoritarian, of what his kingdom should be: Catholic, in the sense of conforming to the doctrines and observances of the western church; feudal, in the sense that a lord–vassal relationship, involving knight-service, should form the basis of government; and open, in the sense that external (especially continental) influences of all kinds, religious, military, and economic, were encouraged and exploited to strengthen the Scottish kingdom. Alongside his eclecticism, David's strong sense of the autonomy of his realm and of his own position within it must be acknowledged. The surviving numbers of his charters, compared with those of his predecessors, surely point to an increase in the sophistication, and probably also in the activity, of government. During David's reign the administration of royal justice became more firmly established and was organized more effectively. Those who enjoyed their own courts were told that the king would intervene if they failed to provide justice. The addresses of royal charters and writs (Scottish ‘brieves’) show that from c.1140 justiciars were appointed. Although none is known by name, these officers were clearly the predecessors of the named justiciars of succeeding reigns." [Oxford Dictionary of National Biography]

  • Sources 
    1. [S128] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant. Full citation details here.

    2. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008.

    3. [S142] Royal Ancestry, by Douglas Richardson. Kimball G. Everingham, ed. 2013.

    4. [S76] The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2004-ongoing).

    5. [S128] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant. Full citation details here., year only.

    6. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008., "1113/4".