Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Thomas of Brotherton

Male 1300 - Aft 1338  (> 38 years)


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  • Name Thomas of Brotherton  [1
    Born 1 Jun 1300  of Brotherton, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3, 4
    Gender Male 
    Died Aft 4 Aug 1338  [4
    Alternate death 23 Aug 1338  Redenhall with Harleston, Norfolk, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 5, 6
    Buried Abbey of Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 7
    Person ID I6699  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others | Ancestor of DDB, Ancestors of JTS, Ancestor of TNH
    Last Modified 9 Jan 2018 

    Father Edward I, King of England,   b. 17 Jun 1239, Westminster Palace, Westminster, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Jul 1307, Burgh-by-Sands, Carlisle, Cumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years) 
    Mother Marguerite of France, Queen Consort of England,   b. Abt 1275,   d. 14 Feb 1318, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 43 years) 
    Married 8 Sep 1299  Canterbury, Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Family ID F2350  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Alice de Hales,   b. Aft 1303, Norfolk, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 12 Oct 1330  (Age < 25 years) 
    Married Aft Jun 1321  [2, 8
    Children 
    +1. Margaret Marshal,   b. Abt 1322,   d. 24 Mar 1399  (Age ~ 77 years)
    Last Modified 27 Dec 2015 
    Family ID F5024  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Earl of Norfolk. Marshal of England. Warden of St. John's Town of Perth.

      "In 1310 Edward II assigned to his brothers Thomas and Edmund jointly the estates of Roger Bigod, late Earl of Norfolk; and on 16 Dec. 1312 Thomas was cr. Earl of Norfolk, and sum. to Parl. as such 8 Jan 1312/3. On 10 Feb. 1315/6 he was cr. Marshal of England." [Complete Peerage]

      "Brotherton, Yorkshire, a small village twenty-two miles outside of the city of York, was part of the honour of Pontefract. Prior to 1300, it had never been a royal residence, or the site of a royal birth, nor has it been one since. It was not even expected to have been one in 1300. Edward I, his new young wife Margaret, who turned twenty-one that year and was pregnant with their first child, and the royal household, set out north from St Albans on 15 April 1300. The army had been summoned to Carlisle for mid-summer, for a new Scottish campaign. Queen Margaret parted company with the main household at Stamford on 5 May, and continued her own journey northward. Preparations had been made for her to use Cawood Castle, a residence of the Archbishop of York, for her confinement. She stopped in the village of Brotherton to hunt late that month, and went into labour, early and unexpectedly. Margaret had married Edward I on 10 September 1299 and, if conception occurred immediately, she was in her 38th week, but as she was apparently hunting and had not yet reached Cawood, she may have been a week or two earlier in her pregnancy. The labour was difficult, and Margaret reportedly called on St Thomas of Canterbury for assistance. The baby was delivered on 1 June, and named for the saint. Edward I rushed over to the village as soon as he was given the news, and stayed there until 9 June (Waugh, 2004; Johnstone, 1946). Thomas was likely baptised in Brotherton's church of St Edward the Confessor, which lay very close to the original manor house." ["Love Matches and Contracted Misery: Thomas of Brotherton and His Daughters (Part 1)," by Brad Verity. Foundations, journal of the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, volume 2, number 2, July 2006.]

      "Many sources relay a date of September 1338, for Thomas's death, using testimony from the Proof of Age of his granddaughter Elizabeth de Segrave as a source (see CIPM 1352-1361, p.115). But Watson's date of 23 August appears to be correct, for the king ordered the seizure of Thomas's goods and chattels on 28 August (see Archer, 1987, p.205 n.9)." ["Love Matches and Contracted Misery: Thomas of Brotherton and His Daughters (Part 1)," by Brad Verity. Foundations, journal of the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, volume 2, number 2, July 2006.] ?

  • Sources 
    1. [S128] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant. Full citation details here.

    2. [S318] Brad Verity, "Love Matches and Contracted Misery: Thomas of Brotherton and His Daughters (Part 1)." Foundations, journal of the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, volume 2, number 2, July 2006.

    3. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008.

    4. [S1526] The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, Wife of Reverend John Owsley, Generations 1-15, Fourth Preliminary Edition by Ronny O. Bodine and Bro. Thomas Spalding, Jr. 2013.

    5. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008., year and month only.

    6. [S128] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant. Full citation details here., year only.

    7. [S142] Royal Ancestry, by Douglas Richardson. Kimball G. Everingham, ed. 2013.

    8. [S128] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant. Full citation details here., "probably circa 1320".