Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Adelaide of Susa

Female Abt 1015 - 1091  (~ 76 years)


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  • Name Adelaide of Susa 
    Born Abt 1015  [1
    Gender Female 
    Died 27 Dec 1091  Canischio, Turino, Piedmont, Italy Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3
    Person ID I702  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others | Ancestor of AP, Ancestor of DDB, Ancestor of JTS, Ancestor of LDN, Ancestor of TNH, Ancestor of TSW, Ancestor of TWK
    Last Modified 12 May 2019 

    Father Olderich II Manfredo,   b. 992,   d. 29 Oct 1034, Turin, Torino, Piedmont, Italy Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 42 years) 
    Mother Berta of Este,   d. 1029 
    Married Bef 1014  [4, 5
    Family ID F2179  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Hermann,   b. Abt 1007,   d. 28 Jul 1038  (Age ~ 31 years) 
    Married Abt 1036  [3
    Children 
    +1. Richwara von Schwaben,   d. Bef 1056
    Last Modified 12 May 2019 
    Family ID F14490  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Otto I of Savoy,   d. Between 19 Jan 1057 and 1060 
    Married Abt 1046  [3
    Children 
    +1. Amadeo II of Savoy,   b. Abt 1050,   d. 26 Jan 1080  (Age ~ 30 years)
    +2. Bertha of Turin,   b. 1051,   d. 27 Dec 1087, Mainz, Hessen, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 36 years)
    +3. Adelheid of Savoy,   b. Abt 1052,   d. 1079  (Age ~ 27 years)
    Last Modified 2 Jun 2019 
    Family ID F263  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Also called Alix.

      Marchioness (Duchess) of Turin. Kick-ass eleventh-century woman who took no crap from anybody, evidently.

      From Wikipedia:

      Since the margravial title primarily had a military purpose at the time, it was thus was not considered suitable for a woman. Emperor Conrad II therefore arranged a marriage between Adelaide and his stepson, Herman IV, in January 1037. Herman was then invested as margrave of Turin. Herman died of the plague while fighting for Conrad II at Naples in July 1038.

      Adelaide remarried in order to secure her vast march. Probably in 1041, and certainly before 19 January 1042, Adelaide married Henry, Marquess of Montferrat. Henry died c. 1045 and left Adelaide a widow for the second time. Immediately, a third marriage was undertaken, this time to Otto of Savoy (1046). With Otto she had three sons, Peter I, Amadeus II, and Otto. The couple also had two daughters, Bertha, who married Henry IV of Germany, and Adelaide, who married Rudolf of Rheinfelden (who later opposed Henry as King of Germany). [...]

      In 1070 Adelaide captured and burned the city of Asti, which had rebelled against her.

      In 1069 Henry IV tried to repudiate Adelaide's daughter, Bertha, which caused Adelaide's relationship with the imperial family to cool. However, through the intervention of Bertha, Henry received Adelaide's support when he came to Italy to submit to Pope Gregory VII and Matilda of Tuscany at Canossa. In return for allowing him to travel through her lands, Henry gave Bugey to Adelaide. Adelaide and her son Amadeus then accompanied Henry IV and Bertha to Canossa, where Adelaide acted as an oath-helper, alongside Matilda and Albert Azzo II, Margrave of Milan, among others. Bishop Benzo of Alba sent several letters to Adelaide between 1080 and 1082, encouraging her to support Henry IV in the Italian wars which formed part of the Investiture Controversy. Adelaide's dealings with Henry IV became closer after this. She offered to mediate between him and Matilda and Tuscany, and may even have joined him on campaign.

      Adelaide made many donations to monasteries in the march of Turin. In 1064 she founded the monastery of Santa Maria at Pinerolo.

      Adelaide received letters from many of the leading churchmen of the day, including Pope Alexander II, Peter Damian, and Pope Gregory VII. These letters indicate that Adelaide sometimes supported Gregorian reform, but that at other times she did not. Peter Damian (writing in 1064) and Gregory VII (writing in 1073), relied upon Adelaide to enforce clerical celibacy and protect the monasteries of Fruttuaria and San Michele della Chiusa. By contrast, Alexander II (writing c. 1066/7) reproached Adelaide for her dealings with Guido da Velate the simoniac Archbishop of Milan. [...]

      Adelaide is a featured figure on Judy Chicago's installation piece The Dinner Party, being represented as one of the 999 names on the Heritage Floor.

  • Sources 
    1. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008.

    2. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008., date only.

    3. [S49] Genealogics, by Leo Van de Pas.

    4. [S160] Wikipedia.

    5. [S834] Alan B. Wilson, 10 Nov 1996, post to soc.genealogy.medieval.