Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Ada de Warenne

Female - 1178


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  • Name Ada de Warenne 
    Gender Female 
    Died 1178  [1, 2, 3, 4
    Person ID I8162  Nielsen Hayden genealogy
    Last Modified 9 Jun 2016 

    Father William II de Warenne,   d. 11 May 1138, Lewes, Sussex, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother Isabel de Vermandois,   d. Bef Jun 1147 
    Married Aft 5 Jun 1118  [1, 3, 5
    Family ID F4959  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Henry of Scotland,   b. Abt 1114,   d. 12 Jun 1152  (Age ~ 38 years) 
    Married Aft 9 Apr 1139  [4, 6, 7
    Children 
    +1. William I "The Lion", King of Scotland,   b. 1143,   d. 4 Dec 1214, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
    +2. Margaret of Huntingdon,   b. Abt 1145,   d. 1201  (Age ~ 56 years)
    +3. David of Scotland,   b. 1152,   d. 17 Jun 1219, Jerdelay, Yardley, Northamptonshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years)
    Last Modified 25 Mar 2017 08:17:45 
    Family ID F1025  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Or Adeline.

      From the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography:

      Her public role as first lady of the Scottish court (there was no queen of Scotland from 1131 to 1186) was originally limited by her numerous pregnancies; but her fecundity averted a catastrophe when Henry, the expected successor to the kingship, died prematurely in 1152. During her widowhood she enjoyed in full measure the respect and status to which she was entitled as mother of two successive Scots kings, Malcolm IV and William the Lion. After Malcolm's enthronement as a boy of twelve in 1153, she figured prominently in his counsels and was keenly aware of her responsibilities. According to the well-informed William of Newburgh, Malcolm's celibacy dismayed her, and she endeavoured, albeit fruitlessly, to sharpen his dynastic instincts by placing a beautiful maiden in his bed. She was less frequently at William the Lion's court from 1165, no doubt because of the periodic illnesses that obliged her to turn to St Cuthbert for a cure.

      Ada's cosmopolitan tastes and connections reinforced the identification of Scottish élite society with European values and norms. Reginald of Durham regarded her piety as exemplary, and she played a notable role in the expansion of the reformed continental religious orders in Scotland. If she had a preference, it was for female monasticism, and by 1159 she had founded a priory for Cistercian nuns at Haddington, apparently at the instigation of Abbot Waldef of Melrose (d. 1159). Her household attracted Anglo-Norman adventurers, and she personally settled in Scotland knights from Northumberland and from the great Warenne honours in England and Normandy.

  • Sources 
    1. [S142] Royal Ancestry, by Douglas Richardson. Kimball G. Everingham, ed. 2013.

    2. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008.

    3. [S128] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant. Full citation details here.

    4. [S76] The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2004-ongoing).

    5. [S1016] Medieval English Ancestors of Robert Abell by Carl Boyer III. Santa Clarita, California, 2001., year only.

    6. [S142] Royal Ancestry, by Douglas Richardson. Kimball G. Everingham, ed. 2013., year only.

    7. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008., year only.