Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Hugh de Mortimer

Male - 1181


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  • Name Hugh de Mortimer  [1
    Born of Wigmore, Herefordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3
    Gender Male 
    Died 26 Feb 1181  [4
    Alternate death Bef 29 Sep 1181  [3, 5
    Person ID I848  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others | Ancestor of DDB, Ancestors of JTS, Ancestor of TNH, Ancestor of TSW
    Last Modified 6 Jan 2018 

    Father Hugh de Mortimer,   b. of Wigmore, Herefordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between 1148 and 1150 
    Mother (Unknown first wife of Hugh de Mortimer) 
    Family ID F4829  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Maud le Meschin,   b. of Skipton-in-Craven, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1180 
    Children 
    +1. Roger de Mortimer,   b. of Wigmore, Herefordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 19 Aug 1214
    Last Modified 18 Dec 2018 
    Family ID F1765  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • "When Henry, Duke of Normandy (Henry II), made promises of great grants to Ranulph, Earl of Chester, in 1153, the fees of Hugh de Mortimer (and those of others) in Staffordshire were excepted. On succeeding to the throne in December 1154 Henry required from Mortimer Bridgnorth Castle, which had been in his hands for many years; he refused to surrender it, whereupon the King proceeded in person first to Cleobury, which he took and destroyed, 17 June 1155, and then to Bridgnorth, which was taken after several days' vigorous assault on 7 July. Some time before 1161 he or his father conceded to Foucarmont gifts made by Hugh and William de St. Germain. In 1167 he was fined £100 in Hants because he refused at the King's command to give up to one of his own knights certain animals taken in distraint when security was offered. He figures in the returns of knights' fees in Normandy of 1172 as owing service of 5 knights and holding himself 13 1/2 knights' fees. The foundation of Wigmore Abbey was completed before Hugh's death. He was also a benefactor to the Templars in Lincolnshire." [Complete Peerage IX:270-2, XIV:488]

      "Hugh (II) de Mortimer's rising was one of several against the new king at this time, largely prompted by Henry's demand for the return of alienated royal lands and castles. But resistance was unco-ordinated: there was no co-operation, for instance, between Mortimer and his neighbour Earl Roger of Hereford. It was at Easter 1155, according to the Battle Abbey chronicle, that Mortimer, 'estimating the king to be a mere boy and indignant at his activity' (Searle, 159–61), fortified Bridgnorth and refused to submit to royal orders. The king promptly placed Bridgnorth, Cleobury, and Wigmore under siege, surrounding Bridgnorth Castle with a rampart and ditch, so that Mortimer could not leave it. With no choice but to surrender, therefore, on 7 July he made his peace with the king, at an impressive assembly of lay and ecclesiastical magnates. He was treated lightly, for whereas the earldom of Hereford was allowed to lapse when Earl Roger died, also in 1155, Hugh de Mortimer soon recovered Bridgnorth and Wigmore (Cleobury had been destroyed), and retained the privileged status of a tenant-in-chief. The fact that King Henry was himself frequently active in Wales may subsequently have had a constraining effect on Mortimer's activities there. In any event, after 1155 he seems to have turned his attention to the affairs of Wigmore, and especially of its abbey." [Oxford Dictionary of National Biography]

  • Sources 
    1. [S160] Wikipedia.

    2. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008.

    3. [S128] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant. Full citation details here.

    4. [S1016] Medieval English Ancestors of Robert Abell by Carl Boyer III. Santa Clarita, California, 2001.

    5. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008., year only.