Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Maud de St. Valéry

Female Abt 1150 - 1210  (~ 60 years)


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Maud de St. Valéry  [1, 2
    Born Abt 1150  [3
    Gender Female 
    Alternate death 1210  Corfe Castle, Dorset, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Died 1210  Windsor, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [5, 6, 7
    Person ID I9224  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others | Ancestor of Barbara Hagan, Ancestor of DDB, Ancestor of JTS, Ancestor of Thomas Butler, Ancestor of TNH, Ancestor of TSW, Ancestor of TWK
    Last Modified 6 Jan 2018 

    Father Bernard de St. Valéry,   b. of Hinton Waldrist, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1190 
    Mother Matilda,   d. Abt 1151 
    Family ID F1842  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family William de Briouze,   b. of Briouze, Normandy, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Aug 1211, Corbeil, near Paris, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. William de Briouze,   d. 1210, Windsor, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
    +2. Reynold de Briouze,   b. of Abergavenny, Monmouthshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between 1227 and 1228
    +3. Bertha de Briouze
    +4. Margaret de Briouze,   b. Abt 1181,   d. Aft 25 Jun 1245  (Age ~ 64 years)
    Last Modified 16 Jun 2018 
    Family ID F2352  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Also called Maud de Braose; Moll Wallbee; Lady of La Haie.

      From Wikipedia:

      "In 1208, William de Braose quarrelled with his friend and patron King John. The reason is not known but it is alleged that Maud made indiscreet comments regarding the murder of King John's nephew Arthur of Brittany. There was also a large sum of money (five thousand marks) de Braose owed the King. Whatever the reason, John demanded Maud's son William be sent to him as a hostage for her husband's loyalty. Maud refused, and stated loudly within earshot of the King's officers that 'she would not deliver her children to a king who had murdered his own nephew.' The King quickly led troops to the Welsh border and seized all of the castles that belonged to William de Braose. Maud and her eldest son William fled to Ireland, where they found refuge at Trim Castle with the de Lacys, the family of her daughter Margaret. In 1210, King John sent an expedition to Ireland. Maud and her son escaped but were apprehended in Galloway by Donnchadh, Earl of Carrick. After being briefly held at Carrickfergus Castle, they were dispatched to England.

      "Maud and her son William were first imprisoned at Windsor Castle, but were shortly afterwards transferred to Corfe Castle in Dorset where they were placed inside the dungeon. Maud and William both starved to death. [...]

      "Maud de Braose features in many Welsh legends. There is one which says that Maud built the castle of Hay-on-Wye single-handed in one night, carrying the stones in her apron. She was also said to have been extremely tall and often donned armour while leading troops into battle."

  • Sources 
    1. [S1178] "Medieval Women: Warfare and Military Activity" by Helen Nicholson. 1999.

    2. [S128] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant. Full citation details here.

    3. [S49] Genealogics, by Leo Van de Pas.

    4. [S160] Wikipedia.

    5. [S142] Royal Ancestry, by Douglas Richardson. Kimball G. Everingham, ed. 2013.

    6. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008.

    7. [S1182] John P. Ravilious, 30 Sep 2002, post to soc.genealogy.medieval., year only.