Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Marmaduke de Thweng

Male - Bef 1323


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  • Name Marmaduke de Thweng  [1, 2
    Born of Kilton in Brotton, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Gender Male 
    Died Bef 26 Feb 1323  [3, 4, 5
    Person ID I9854  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others | Ancestor of TNH
    Last Modified 9 Jan 2018 

    Father Marmaduke de Thweng,   b. of Kilton in Brotton, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between 1282 and 1284 
    Mother Lucy de Brus,   d. Aft 29 Mar 1282 
    Married Abt 1242  [3, 5, 6
    Family ID F3716  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Isabel de Ros,   b. of Ingmanthorpe, Kirk Deighton, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1309 
    Married 1273  [1, 5
    Children 
    +1. Lucy de Thweng,   b. Abt 1290, Kilton Castle, Cleveland, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1325  (Age ~ 34 years)
    Last Modified 9 Nov 2015 
    Family ID F2441  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Summoned to Parliament by writs 22 Feb 1307 to 18 Sep 1322.

      "[P]layed a leading role at the battle of Stirling in 1297, but in 1299 was taken prisoner and ransomed by the Scots. [...] In 1312 he joined Thomas, earl of Lancaster, in the attack upon Piers Gaveston, and in 1321, at the time of Lancaster's great rebellion, his loyalties were the subject of suspicion by the crown." [Oxford Dictionary of National Biography]

      From Wikipedia:

      In 1297 Marmaduke achieved some fame at the Battle of Stirling Bridge by a heroic escape. Over 100 English knights had been trapped, together with several thousand infantry, on the far side of the river, and were being slaughtered by the Scots. Thweng managed to fight his way back across the bridge and he thus became the only knight of all those on the far side of the river to survive the battle. Following the rout, Thweng with William FitzWarin were appointed castellans of Stirling Castle by the English leader John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey. The castle was quickly starved into submission, and Thweng and FitzWarin were taken prisoner to Dumbarton Castle.

      At the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314, however, after the English defeat, Sir Marmaduke apparently made no attempt to escape. Instead he wandered over the battlefield until he located Robert the Bruce; only then was he prepared to surrender, and only to the victorious King. Robert recognised Sir Marmaduke and released him and Ralph de Monthermer, also captured, both without ransom, but not without first entertaining them at table.

  • Sources 
    1. [S789] The Wallop Family and Their Ancestry, by Vernon James Watney. Oxford, 1928.

    2. [S991] Early Yorkshire Families ed. Charles Travis Clay and Diana E. Greenway. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1973.

    3. [S142] Royal Ancestry, by Douglas Richardson. Kimball G. Everingham, ed. 2013.

    4. [S76] The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2004-ongoing)., year only.

    5. [S128] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant. Full citation details here.

    6. [S76] The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2004-ongoing).