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November 15, 2005

Linux problem fixed
Posted by Teresa at 03:02 PM * 24 comments

Today’s e-mail from Steve Brust:

Graydon neatly solved the more serious and important of the Linux problems—I am now able to find the files I need to edit. There’s some additional tuning stuff that I’d like to do, but we’re looking good.

Thanks!

Oh, and altogether I got about fifteen or twenty responses to your post. It was pretty cool!

It sure was. My thanks as well to all involved, especially Graydon.
Comments on Linux problem fixed:
#1 ::: xeger ::: (view all by) ::: November 15, 2005, 03:16 PM:

Congrats to Graydon!!!

Can we make a t-shirt for him that names him as a Brother of St. Anthony :)

[I'm ... very curious about this Graydon - care to expand?]

#2 ::: Serge ::: (view all by) ::: November 15, 2005, 03:24 PM:

"And there was MUCH rejoicing."

#3 ::: Andrew Cory ::: (view all by) ::: November 15, 2005, 03:31 PM:

Any idea when Mr. Brust will start Blogging again? I know his site was hosed a few months ago, but everything seems to be up and running again—save his blog...

#4 ::: Graydon ::: (view all by) ::: November 15, 2005, 03:31 PM:

He'd transfered a drive with three partitions to another system with a different distro already installed on another drive; it was just a matter of adding mount points and fstab entries for those partitions. (This sort of thing used to be a lot harder, but with udev-based distros, if it's not in /dev it doesn't exist.)

#5 ::: Lenny Bailes ::: (view all by) ::: November 15, 2005, 04:07 PM:

Steve is now blogging on Livejournal.

In re partitions and mountpoints: I remember Graydon's stern warnings about the unwisdom of mounting FAT32 and NTFS partitions (belonging to Windows) on the same computer with Linux, when I was a newbee. But several Linux distros now do that automatically. (I'm still more comfortable mounting NTFS partitions under Linux as read-only; but in some versions you now have to go out of your way to do that.)

#6 ::: Stefan Jones ::: (view all by) ::: November 15, 2005, 04:47 PM:

If this were a party, this is the point where all the geeks would wander out of the hosts' home office or entertainment center, staring at their shoes, wondering if more guacamole dip was on the way.

#7 ::: Mary Dell ::: (view all by) ::: November 15, 2005, 04:57 PM:

If this were a party, this is the point where all the geeks would wander out of the hosts' home office or entertainment center, staring at their shoes, wondering if more guacamole dip was on the way.

Hm, not the parties I go to. This is the point where a friendly discussion about the relative worth of different kernels would begin and immediately devolve into a full-out brawl, with aspersions being cheerfully flung in all directions, along with the occasional jell-o shot.

#8 ::: Serge ::: (view all by) ::: November 15, 2005, 05:35 PM:

Why jell-o?

#9 ::: Graydon ::: (view all by) ::: November 15, 2005, 07:07 PM:

Lenny --

The support mechanisms for vfat and NTFS have improved substantially since that far-off day.

On the other hand, you still get either brain-death (vfat file name character restrictions) or the six separate flavours of doom that is NTFS' attempt to not care what code page encoding you were using when creating file names. Much, much better to go to utf-8 and have done.

#10 ::: Ross Smith ::: (view all by) ::: November 15, 2005, 07:29 PM:

Serge: Why jell-o?

Why, what would you rather people threw at each other?

On second thought, don't answer that.

#11 ::: xeger ::: (view all by) ::: November 15, 2005, 08:27 PM:

Stephan comments:

If this were a party, this is the point where all the geeks would wander out of the hosts' home office or entertainment center, staring at their shoes, wondering if more guacamole dip was on the way.

I can see that we don't go to the same sort of party :)

The parties I go to seem to be entirely geeks of one sort or another - whether it's the people discussing food (or sex) in the kitchen, writing in the bedroom, hair colour in the bathroom[0], music in the home office, or computers in the living room.

[0] Or if there's a way to get the bathroom door unlocked...

#12 ::: Serge ::: (view all by) ::: November 15, 2005, 08:28 PM:

How about guacamole, Ross? I guess jell-o is easier to clean off.

#13 ::: Carl ::: (view all by) ::: November 15, 2005, 10:43 PM:

There's always room for jell-o!

#14 ::: Mary Dell ::: (view all by) ::: November 16, 2005, 12:27 AM:

always room for jell-o SHOTS. Mostly they get flung towards our livers.

#15 ::: Serge ::: (view all by) ::: November 16, 2005, 08:34 AM:

The culture of computer people who started in a mainframe environment appears to be quite different from the more modern culture of personal computing. Then again mainframes were the province of government, and of big corporations, none of which encouraged food fights, and the machines were so expensive and awkward to use that a by-the-seat-of-their-pants attitude could not not really take root. I guess.

#16 ::: xeger ::: (view all by) ::: November 16, 2005, 09:14 AM:

Serge must have been somewhere else to be able to say:

The culture of computer people who started in a mainframe environment appears to be quite different from the more modern culture of personal computing. Then again mainframes were the province of government, and of big corporations, none of which encouraged food fights, and the machines were so expensive and awkward to use that a by-the-seat-of-their-pants attitude could not not really take root. I guess.

Allow me to point you to the Last Game of Cricket.

Reading through the history of the model railroad club is also - well - I'm not sure that 'enlightening' is the correct term - entertaining.

#17 ::: Sandy ::: (view all by) ::: November 16, 2005, 09:27 AM:

"Why jell-o?"

Because it's a lot harder to spill jell-o shots than regular ones.

And they melt in your stomach!

#18 ::: Serge ::: (view all by) ::: November 16, 2005, 09:33 AM:

As a matter of fact, xeger, I was somewhere else. In Canada. I don't know if that has anything to do with the way things were for me. Also, in all the years I worked in all those places, the SF culture was nowhere to be seen. THAT probably has something to do with it.

#19 ::: Scott H ::: (view all by) ::: November 16, 2005, 09:41 AM:

Slightly off-topic:

Any of you guys have opinions about Cygwin sshd? I'm toying with the idea of enabling remote access to my XP machine via the private LAN at my house, but security is obviously a concern.

#20 ::: Jakob ::: (view all by) ::: November 16, 2005, 11:23 AM:

My experience with Cygwin and sshd has been... painful. My local gurus would tend to suggest it's not worth the effort.

#21 ::: xeger ::: (view all by) ::: November 16, 2005, 06:19 PM:

Serge wrote:

As a matter of fact, xeger, I was somewhere else. In Canada. I don't know if that has anything to do with the way things were for me. Also, in all the years I worked in all those places, the SF culture was nowhere to be seen. THAT probably has something to do with it.

Er... It can't have. I ran into that one when I was in Canada. The SF culture? Maybe... but it hasn't really been in evidence at any of my workplaces either. I don't suppose you're somewhere helpful like Kapuskasing?

#22 ::: Serge ::: (view all by) ::: November 16, 2005, 06:36 PM:

Nope, I wasn't in Kapuskasing, xeger. I was in Toronto, more exactly in Mississauga, which is in the 'burbs. There certainly wasn't much of the SF culture in my workplace. The closest to it was one of my co-workers who knew I often went to a comic-book store so I picked up the A.L.F. comic for him. (Not for myself, THANK you.)

Outside of the workplace, though, I ran into a lot of the SF culture. My wife was working at the Judith Merrill collection, and I had buddies and buddettes working at Bakka, the SF bookstore.

#23 ::: xeger ::: (view all by) ::: November 16, 2005, 06:57 PM:

ScottH - I've used cygwin's ssh, but I don't really see a reason to do it unless I'm running the entire cygwin environment. SecureCRT / Putty and WinSCP do a fine job of covering my requirements as stands (not that I run windows, but when I need to).

#24 ::: Berry ::: (view all by) ::: November 17, 2005, 03:57 PM:

And now Steve's "tuning" is done, and both his monitors are working at the right resolutions, thanks to the wonders of AIM, EMail and dogged persistence in tweaking the X Windows config.

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