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January 26, 2009

Congratulations—
Posted by Teresa at 07:22 PM * 81 comments

—to Neil Gaiman for winning “what is widely considered the most prestigious honor in children’s literature,” the Newbery Medal, for The Graveyard Book.

Neil is famous, of course, but front-page-of-the-New York Times-famous? Woo.

Of course, the entire science fiction field asks only one question, and we ask it with one voice…did Neil say “Fuck! I’ve won the Newbery Medal!”

Comments on Congratulations--:
#1 ::: Xopher ::: (view all by) ::: January 26, 2009, 07:48 PM:

Whoo-hoo! Go Neil Go!

#2 ::: A.J. ::: (view all by) ::: January 26, 2009, 08:03 PM:

Sweet!

Still, it's a pity that Neil had to xvyy bss Obq'f qbt before they gave him a medal. But maybe that was meant as a kind of parody/reference.

#3 ::: Bruce Cohen (SpeakerToManagers) ::: (view all by) ::: January 26, 2009, 08:04 PM:

did Neil say “Fuck! I’ve won the Newbery Medal!”
He says on his blog that he didn't, despite that it was not yet 6AM when he got the call.

Way to go, Neil!*

* Ambiguity about what I'm congratulating him for is intentional.

#4 ::: ADM ::: (view all by) ::: January 26, 2009, 08:12 PM:

I would bet money he said it -- but not to the awards committee!

#5 ::: Sarah Miller ::: (view all by) ::: January 26, 2009, 08:25 PM:

ADM: From Neil's Twitter feed:

"Newbery, not Newbury. Also FUCK!!!! I won the FUCKING NEWBERY THIS IS SO FUCKING AWESOME. I thank you. "

(I suspect that was shortly after he'd actually gained consciousness, instead of just waking up.)

#6 ::: annalee flower horne ::: (view all by) ::: January 26, 2009, 08:44 PM:

Yaaaaaaaaaay NEIL!

He says on his blog that he didn't swear when he was told, but he also says that his agent's first question was "you didn't star swearing, did you?"

#7 ::: HP ::: (view all by) ::: January 26, 2009, 08:51 PM:

So, from reading Neil's weblog, I discover that at precisely the same moment he was falling asleep listening to the Jack Benny show on his iPod, I was falling asleep listening to the BBC-radio adaptation of Anansi Boys on my iPod.

As near as I can tell, according to quantum physics, this means that I am entangled with either Phil Harris or Grahame Coats. I'm not sure which, nor am I sure it would make a great deal of difference.

#8 ::: cap ::: (view all by) ::: January 26, 2009, 08:54 PM:

I've had the book sitting on my shelf since Christmas, but hadn't gotten to it because I was reading something else (by Charles de Lint - pretty sweet), and then classes started again.

But now I have to read it. Newbery Medals are perfectly good excuses to put off more boring reading - I mean, The Graveyard Book is practically academic now. Right? Right?

#9 ::: Lois Fundis ::: (view all by) ::: January 26, 2009, 09:02 PM:

cap @ 8: Right.

#10 ::: Nicole J. LeBoeuf-Little ::: (view all by) ::: January 26, 2009, 09:16 PM:

Great, now I need to buy a new copy, one that has the Newbery Medal embossed on the front cover.

But seriously - this is wonderful news! I'm so happy for Neil.

#11 ::: David Harmon ::: (view all by) ::: January 26, 2009, 10:04 PM:

I got the book for my birthday, though I didn't read it until after I'd finished Interworld. I liked both books, though I'm not sure I'd place The Graveyard Book above Coraline. That might change on rereading, though.) I still have his bio of Douglas Adams waiting.

Now I'm reading Prince Of Stories, an overview of his work assembled by Hank Wagner, Christopher Golden, and Stephen R. Bissette. So far, it looks like pretty good! (Warning: Massive and thorough spoilers!)

#12 ::: David Harmon ::: (view all by) ::: January 26, 2009, 10:09 PM:

OK, that was typoriffic. ;-( Time to hit the sack....

#13 ::: elise ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 12:33 AM:

Want to the Coraline preview tonight. Lorraine looked blissed. She told us Neil was off to New York to do the Today show.

#14 ::: Tlönista ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 12:53 AM:

Hooray! I haven't even read it yet, been so busy, but it's wonderful to think of Neil Gaiman ranked among all the great authors I read as a kid.

#15 ::: debcha ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 01:31 AM:

Tlonista, #14 (sorry, can't do the umlaut):

That's exactly what I thought. Neil has said many times that he would like to be/expects to be remembered through his children's books, which will then lead people to his other work. When I heard that The Graveyard Book had won the Newbery, I knew that he had just joined the ranks of the immortals.

Incidentally, Roald Dahl played a similar role for me - after reading all of his books in the kids' section, I somehow discovered that he had books in the adult side too, and checked them out (both literally and figuratively). I don't think that I suffered any severe repercussions, but "Switch Bitch" and "My Uncle Oswald" are not really books for nine-year-olds, however precocious.

#16 ::: julia ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 03:15 AM:

It's an awfully good book, I thought. The live readings of it on his recent tour are available online here

#17 ::: Daniel Klein ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 04:26 AM:

It's the kind of book that makes you want to have children so you can give it to them to read. It's the kind of book you put down early and often just so you don't run out of pages quite as soon. It was absolutely magical and highly deserved that award. Go Neil!

#18 ::: Velma ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 07:59 AM:

Hurrah! I intend to buy two copies, one for myself, and one for the Demon Godchild and her mother.

#19 ::: Fragano Ledgister ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 08:57 AM:

This is most aptly deserved.

#20 ::: punkrockhockeymom ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 09:07 AM:

W00t! Puppy and I are about to commence reading it. Whee! Go Neil!

#21 ::: Nicole J. LeBoeuf-Little ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 10:29 AM:

It's the kind of book you put down early and often just so you don't run out of pages quite as soon.

I'm afraid I didn't have that kind of self-restraint. Alas. I tried, but I ate everything from chapter 4 onward in a single morning between the hours of about 4 and 8 AM. (John had to be to work in downtown Denver for 5, which meant a horrifically early morning for the whole household, all two humans and two cats of us.)

I was excited to hear Neil read chapter 7 (part two) here in Boulder, and I'm so glad that the entire tour is available to posterity. Hearing Neil read makes me gently, wistfully envious of his kids.

#22 ::: Terry Karney ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 10:48 AM:

debcha: On umlauts. If you want to insert one, the pattern is, & + letter + uml + ; = umlauted letter, e.g. ë, or ö. If you use an upper case letter in the coding you get one in the output.

It's picky, only lets you use it for some letters, which means e.g. &xuml; doesn't work, so I can show what it looks like all put together.

#23 ::: Theophylact ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 11:01 AM:

Terry @ #22: Wot, no heavy metal umlauts?

#24 ::: L.N. Hammer ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 11:42 AM:

Don't forget to also tip the hat to Sir Terry Pratchett, whose Nation is a Prinz Honor book.

(For those who don't know, the Newbery slants younger -- most winners are middle-grade novels for older elementary school students -- while the Prinz is specifically for young adult novels. Both are awarded by the American Library Association. The Prinz is not yet as prestigious as the Newbery, but it's still Big.)

---L.

#25 ::: Zack ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 12:31 PM:

#23: If you absolutely must have a heavy metal umlaut (as in This Is Spin̈al Tap) you may be able to get one by putting ̈ after your letter of choice; that's the code for U+0308 COMBINING DIAERESIS. Results may vary, void where prohibited.

#26 ::: Kevin Reid ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 12:36 PM:

In principle, you can umlaut diaeresis anything by following the character immediately with U+0308 COMBINING DIAERESIS, which can be written in HTML as “̈”. Provided the viewing browser supports Unicode decently, you can have all the ẍ and ḧëäv̈ÿ m̈ëẗäl̈ üm̈l̈äüẗs̈ you want. (The preceding noun phrase will serve as a test case.)

(I see someone else has said this already while I was composing it...)

#27 ::: Tom Whitmore ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 01:39 PM:

Congratulations, Neil! Knew you had it in you!

(And Henry Kaiser, a long-term reader and cognoscento of SF as well as being a cool musician, is up for an Oscar this year, with Werner Herzog in the long-form documentary!)

#28 ::: Terry Karney ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 01:41 PM:

I will point out the combined diareses in those examples are all 1/2 letter shifted to the right.

#29 ::: Cat Meadors ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 01:54 PM:

Is the Newbery the one that looks just like a chocolate medallion? I'm pretty sure that's the one Terry Pratchett told the story of winning; they give it to you when you win, then later there's a ceremony and you give it back so they can present it to you. So he switched his with a big chocolate coin, and when presented with it, unwrapped and ate it. According to him, the room (full of librarians) was half astonished that they'd never known the award was made of chocolate, and half aghast at him eating around books. (Drat, now I see that it was the Carnegie Medal, not the Newbery, which duh, I should have known because the Newbery is a US award; but it's still a good story and I'm leaving it.)

I know I already said in the Open Thread, but the Graveyard Book I didn't so much care for - it just wasn't as good as I wanted it to be. And I'd read Neverwhere to my kid before GB, as far as general scariness and theminesss goes. (Um, not much before, not NOW or anything, just generally before.) I think I read there are different editions in the UK for adult/young readers - anyone know which the US version is (or if it's entirely different)?

And hey, Mo Willems won a Geisel award! I love his books. (But I haven't seen that one yet.)

#30 ::: Cat Meadors ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 01:59 PM:

And you know, I should still add a huge congratulations. Because even if I liked Coraline more, the big important point is that Gaiman won an award, and that is Super Cool.

#31 ::: Lylassandra ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 02:00 PM:

@29: I feel you. I loved the concept of The Graveyard Book so much when I first heard about it that it could never have matched my expectations. A matter of Platonic ideals and all that, I suppose. But other than the slight niggle of disappointment, I very much enjoyed it.

#32 ::: Carrie S. ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 02:08 PM:

If you absolutely must have a heavy metal umlaut (as in This Is Spin̈al Tap) you may be able to get one by putting ̈ after your letter of choice; that's the code for U+0308 COMBINING DIAERESIS.

Is there a similar code for combining macron, or combining dot (as if you were dotting an I, but for other letters, as used in older Irish texts)?

#33 ::: Zack ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 02:39 PM:

Carrie S @32: Yep! Combining macron is U+0304 / &#772; and combining dot above is U+0307 / &#775;. You can find tables of these things at <http://www.unicode.org/charts/symbols.html>.

#34 ::: Ralph GIles ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 02:42 PM:

Carrie: Yes. Combining mācron is &#772;. Combining dȯt above is &#775;.

See the combining diacritical marks chart for a generous list. Unfortunately I don't know how to give it hexadecimal values, so one still has to covert the entities to decimal manually.

#35 ::: Zack ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 02:47 PM:

Theoretically one can write &#x....; with the dots replaced with the hexadecimal code, but ISTR that doesn't work universally. But then, neither do the combining characters work universally in the first place (that's much better than it used to be, but still not great, e.g. for me the word "dȯt" from Ralph @34 appears with the dot well to the right of where it ought to be).

#36 ::: Carrie S. ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 03:03 PM:

Oooh, and even better there's a retroflex hook. Which is what I really need. Thanks, all!

#37 ::: Ralph Giles ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 03:10 PM:

What is really cool, is I've finally discovered how to do two more of the transliteration characters for transliteration of Egytian hieroglyphs.

There are four 'h' sounds: h, ḥ, ḫ, and ẖ. Likewise t and , d and (or ṯ, ḏ and for newer, single-character versions). Some older texts also use ı̉, but nowadays that's usually just j or i. Likewise has become q And the ayin is ʿ. So if only I knew how to do the 'aleph' that looks like a 3 broken in the middle, I'd be done. Last I heard that just wasn't encoded. :(

Well, that, and my browser doesn't space most of those correctly in italic.

#38 ::: Xopher ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 04:14 PM:

I have to look at these when I get home; my browser at work doesn't display any of this (we're stuck with IE6). I want to see if I can finally write the name of a Hausa story correctly: Díla da Zarɓe.

Right now the ɓ, which should be a hooked b, is just a box. It's actually an ingressive mouth-air consonant in Hausa, which is like totally cool.

#39 ::: abi ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 04:17 PM:

Congratulations indeed to Neil. I enjoyed The Graveyard Book; it's on the list to recommend to the kids (or read to them, but we're in LOTR right now).

And once people discover his work because of the medal, then they can try all his other work and pick their own favorites.

It's full of win.

#40 ::: Xopher ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 04:22 PM:

Cool! The Hungarian stuff works even on this crappy browser! Of course I knew to write &ouml; for ö and &oacute; for ó, but in Hungarian the acute is used as a long mark and the umlaut is an umlaut, and they combine them for long, umlauted sounds...I can finally write o&#x030B; for ő!

#41 ::: Steve Taylor ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 06:11 PM:

I heard him read a bit of it when he came to Melbourne and it was sheer delight. I think this one will take his novels to the next level (his short stories have already been at the next level for years now). I can't wait to read it.

With this and Coraline coming out, he must be having a good time. As well he should.

#42 ::: Stefan Jones ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 06:26 PM:

Neil G. was interviewed on NPR's Morning Edition this morning (1/27/2009). Nice insights into how The Graveyard Book came about.

I have such mixed thoughts about the Coraline movie. It was made right in Portland, by painstaking stop-motion animation. You have to respect that. But it could still be a dud.

Sigh.

#43 ::: debcha ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 06:33 PM:

Thanks, Terry (#22) and others. Amplifying other comments: in my browser, Firefox 3.0.5, the umlaut method looks fine but the combining diaresis also has the half-character shift right.

#44 ::: WereBear ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 07:37 PM:

@29: Great Terry Pratchett story!

Sounds like The Graveyard Book would make a lovely gift; though I'd have to read it first, make sure it was appropriate :)

#45 ::: Serge ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 08:36 PM:

In case people didn't know, P.Craig Russell's adaptation of The Dream Hunters is out there in comics stores.

#46 ::: Descartes ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 08:54 PM:

The Newbery is a big freaking deal, forget about all that music stuff-This Is Big! I will have to look into getting a copy.

#47 ::: Syd ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 09:33 PM:

Cat Meadors @ 29: Re: various editions of The Graveyard Book, I went trolling through Neil's journal on the subject.

From what I can find, Neil originally started calling it a book for adults that children would like also (date of post is Feb. 24, 2008), but I can't find anything on differing versions for the adult and YA markets. And I remember reading on his blog (but canNOT find now, so it must have been an untagged entry) that the only major differences between the US and UK editions was the Britishization (if you will) of certain terms. E.g., "cot" for "crib" comes to mind, as does "torch" for "flashlight," although now I'm trying to remember if there was a flashlight in Graveyard or am I thinking of Coraline?

Others stronger in Google-fu and the like may be able to tell you more...

#48 ::: David Harmon ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 09:37 PM:

Terry @#28: Not for me: they're all more or less over the letters, but the "x"'s dots are a little right of center, and the "h"'s are centered on the letter's staff. The "m"'s dots are just a tad right of center, too. As others have noted, that depends mostly on your browser -- I'm using Firefox 3.05 on Ubuntu.

#49 ::: Xopher ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 10:25 PM:

The hooked b looks right now that I'm home (FireFox 3.0.1), but the umlaut-acute is half a space over. Meh.

#50 ::: Marilee ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 11:43 PM:

I had to wait in the library's hold queueueue for The Graveyard Book and here's what I thought of it.

Ah, the library currently has all three copies checked out, one on hold, a 24-person hold queueueue, and is acquiring fifteen more. Smart people.

#51 ::: Terry Karney ::: (view all by) ::: January 27, 2009, 11:51 PM:

Firefox 3.0.5 on XP Media Edition (and that's how the letters look to me Xopher. Half a win is still to the good).

#52 ::: janeyolen ::: (view all by) ::: January 28, 2009, 06:51 AM:

Neil on his FaceBook page, before the award was announced (but immediately after he'd been called) wrote "I am so fucking over the moon." And I had two simultaneous thoughts: Congratulations, Neil, and you are such a bad boy jumping the gun like that.

It was a matter of minutes, really, and understandable. In the old days (before Internet) he would have been on the phone with friends.

Jane

#53 ::: julia ::: (view all by) ::: January 28, 2009, 08:39 AM:

@ 29 & 31 - Part of what made Graveyard Book fun for me is the way he used the language and the structure to refer back to Kipling and the distinctive way he constructed things in the Jungle Book (that was also one of the things I liked about the first Harry Potter book, which was a lot like Stalky and Co). As modern english, it's a little bit mannered.

I guess it's like seeing Star Wars - it's one movie if your frame of reference is the WW2 movies Lucas picked scenes out of, and another if it isn't.

#54 ::: dbourne ::: (view all by) ::: January 28, 2009, 05:05 PM:

Sounds like a good book to add to the pile to be read next week, in my week off - after thee months of "evenings, yes I've heard of them" and "weekends - ah yes, those are the days for working 8-10 hours a day instead of 12-14 hours a day".

Congrats to Neil.

#55 ::: Steve Taylor ::: (view all by) ::: January 28, 2009, 06:17 PM:

Cat Meadors at #29 writes:

> I think I read there are different editions in the UK for adult/young readers - anyone know which the US version is (or if it's entirely different)?

It also looks as if they might be following the Harry Potter route and doing young readers editions and adult editions - though I could just be confusing US vs UK versions here.

Regardles - at one (import, sf specialty) bookshop I've seen an edition with Dave McKean illustrations which are very nice, and at another general bookshop I've seen an edition which has much more of a 'younger readers' look to it which has Chris Riddell illustrations which are just plain wonderful.

Dave McKean:
http://www.thegraveyardbook.com/illustrations/

Chris Riddell:
http://pwbeat.publishersweekly.com/blog/2008/05/01/chris-riddells-illustrations-for-the-graveyard-book/

#56 ::: Marilee ::: (view all by) ::: January 29, 2009, 02:09 AM:

julia, #53, I haven't read The Jungle Book but I enjoyed The Graveyard Book.

Steve, #55, I didn't like the McKean illos. Not my style, and not very accurate to the book.

#57 ::: David Goldfarb ::: (view all by) ::: January 29, 2009, 05:48 AM:

I read The Graveyard Book first and The Jungle Book shortly afterward. I only noticed one close parallel in terms of the plot.

#58 ::: Paul A. ::: (view all by) ::: January 29, 2009, 07:22 AM:

I can think of two chapters from The Jungle Book, and one from The Second Jungle Book, that have specific echoes in The Graveyard Book. (And now I'm wondering whether it would be considered spoilery to say which. I think not, since the details are different, including the details of how things end, but perhaps it's better to be safe.)

#59 ::: Cat Meadors ::: (view all by) ::: January 29, 2009, 10:53 AM:

Funny, I just re-read it and it occurred to me that I might like it more if I'd ever read The Jungle Book. (It turns out that I actually do like most parts of the book; just not the last chapter or the thing considered as a whole.) I didn't pick up on it the first time, but there were a lot of allusion-y feeling bits the second time.

Dave McKean - I like his stuff, sometimes. The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish is a favorite in our house, and I liked Neverwhere (and the other movie that was based on his stuff, but I'm blanking on the name). But sometimes I think he's way off the mark, and this was definitely one of them. I should try to find out what the other illustrator did.

Oh, and I did find out about the adult/youth versions - the only difference is the illustrations, and Dave McKean did the adult one, so that seems to be what the US got. (Not counting the localization. Which I'm not really fond of - back when it took 3-5 years for Terry Pratchett books to get published in the US, I had the UK ones imported, and it's been an education for my daughter, who now knows all about pavements and torches and lorries. It's not like he writes in Icelandic! It's not going to cause all the delicate USians to faint if they read the word "lift"! Sheesh.) Wish they had a look inside, but here's the cover of the Chris Riddell version.

#60 ::: Rob Rusick ::: (view all by) ::: January 29, 2009, 02:58 PM:

Cat Meadors @59: [..] and the other movie that was based on his stuff, but I'm blanking on the name [..]

Mirrormask?

#61 ::: Nicole J. LeBoeuf-Little ::: (view all by) ::: January 30, 2009, 02:14 AM:

In The Graveyard Book I was surprised and delighted to stumble upon a very strong Mary Poppins allusion among the Jungle Book ones. It's the last story in Mary Poppins in the Park, unmistakeably so.

Which I think I need to reread now.

{{tucks self into bed with book}}

#62 ::: julia ::: (view all by) ::: January 30, 2009, 11:22 AM:

It's not so much the plot points that reminded me of the Jungle Book. The way the language was put together just reminded me a little of the way Kipling used words in his children's stories. Puck of Pook's Hill is kind of similar, only with a bit less of the stalwart man of empire orientalism.

It's a very different voice than his poems.

#63 ::: Serge ::: (view all by) ::: January 30, 2009, 12:12 PM:

Cat Meadors... Rob Rusick... There is also Stardust, but I preferred Neverwhere in spite of its very low budget, or maybe because of it. I have the DVD of Mirrormask although I haven't watched it yet. I probably should do so soon. I mean, how could I resist the following line, about sock puppets?

"Ha! You may think I'm a hardhearted black sock, but underneath this dark woolly exterior is a naked pink foot."
#64 ::: Ben Engelsberg ::: (view all by) ::: January 31, 2009, 12:11 AM:

Nicole @ 21: Let me strongly and with enthusiasm recommend the audiobook version of Graveyard Book, which is read wonderfully by the author.

Audible:
http://www.audible.com/adbl/site/products/ProductDetail.jsp?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&productID=BK_HARP_001709

I dont know if it should be unusual that one of the days best story writers should also be one of the days best story readers, or if the skills are complimentary.

#65 ::: Stefan Jones ::: (view all by) ::: January 31, 2009, 01:53 AM:

Gaiman's reading of Coraline was nice too. Made the little songs especially creepy.

I had to resort to a little pushiness, but I got my sister & her family to watch Stardust. They loved it. Last I heard, my nieces watched it again with their grandmother.

#66 ::: Paul A. ::: (view all by) ::: January 31, 2009, 06:00 AM:

Serge @ #63:

I believe the discussion was specifically about those that had design input from Dave McKean, which includes Neverwhere and MirrorMask but not Stardust (not even indirectly, since the original book was illustrated by Charles Vess instead).

And you should definitely watch MirrorMask. How else will you ever learn what you get when you juggle bananas?

#67 ::: Serge ::: (view all by) ::: January 31, 2009, 08:43 AM:

Paul A @ 66... what you get when you juggle bananas

One becomes incredibly attractive to many people because of the mass o' peel?

#68 ::: Serge ::: (view all by) ::: January 31, 2009, 08:55 AM:

Paul A @ 66... About Vess... I've always liked his art. I also like him. No, I never met him or talked to him. Back in the late 1980s, I was living in Toronto, and friend Caroline Julian was working at the Silver Snail comics store. She met Vess(*), who saw some art that my wife had done, and he said very nice things about it.


(*) And Mark Hammill, who came in and bought old Superboy comics, but that was on a separate occasion.

#69 ::: Michael I ::: (view all by) ::: January 31, 2009, 09:13 AM:

Serge@67

As long as you don't monkey around too much...

#70 ::: Ginger ::: (view all by) ::: January 31, 2009, 10:55 AM:

Michael I @ 69: Musa we start again? Serge will be fingered as the source, and he'll split before the bananhammer comes down.

#71 ::: Fragano Ledgister ::: (view all by) ::: January 31, 2009, 11:43 AM:

Ginger #70: Shame on you for plantain such ideas.

#72 ::: Kathryn from Sunnyvale ::: (view all by) ::: January 31, 2009, 01:55 PM:

Serge @67,

By slipping that in, you'll make a musa this place.
Gros.

Michel @69, let's all paws.

#73 ::: Ginger ::: (view all by) ::: January 31, 2009, 02:57 PM:

Fragano @ 71: It was just too appealing.

#74 ::: Michael I ::: (view all by) ::: January 31, 2009, 03:46 PM:

I should have known everyone would go ape with the puns...

#75 ::: Serge ::: (view all by) ::: January 31, 2009, 04:12 PM:

Puns are always ape-ossibility with this bunch.

#76 ::: Fragano Ledgister ::: (view all by) ::: January 31, 2009, 04:34 PM:

Ginger #73: So you just monkeyed around with it?

#77 ::: Serge ::: (view all by) ::: January 31, 2009, 05:10 PM:

Kathryn from Sunnyvale @ 72... you'll make a musa this place

Not only that, but there's plantain where that came from.

#78 ::: Terry Karney ::: (view all by) ::: February 01, 2009, 11:12 AM:

I'll join in with giving a hand to anyone who wants to juggle bannanas.

#79 ::: debcha ::: (view all by) ::: February 02, 2009, 04:16 PM:

Cat Meadors, #59:I had the UK [Pratchett books] imported, and it's been an education for my daughter, who now knows all about pavements and torches and lorries. It's not like he writes in Icelandic! It's not going to cause all the delicate USians to faint if they read the word "lift"! Sheesh.

Canada is too small a market to have its own dedicated version of most books, so you pretty much just get to read books in whatever version of the language they were originally published in. There's no reason to believe that little Canadian children are smarter than their American counterparts, and as far as I know, none of them have been traumatized from having read the Harry Potter books in the original English. You just deal.

#80 ::: Neil Gaiman ::: (view all by) ::: February 02, 2009, 10:44 PM:

Thank you all, so much.

#81 ::: Linkmeister ::: (view all by) ::: February 21, 2009, 12:44 PM:

I got it from my library and read it last night. The copy hadn't yet gotten the nifty gold seal saying "Newberry Award Winner." That was the only thing missing from it. I really enjoyed it.

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