July 22, 2014
A fund for Velma and Soren
Posted by Patrick at 07:30 AM * 4 comments

A guest post by Debbie Notkin:

Many Making Light readers know Velma and Soren (Scraps) deSelby-Bowen. Those who read the open threads here may also know that Velma has recently been diagnosed with cancer. She hasn’t been very specific on the site, but I have her permission to tell you (to tell anyone, in fact) that the cancer is “smooth muscle cell neoplasm.” Velma was scheduled for surgery tomorrow (7/23), but they have just discovered at least one infection, and surgery may be postponed. Velma’s doctors tell her that surgery will likely be followed by chemotherapy. I will do my best to keep Making Light readers informed as I learn more.

Velma has been out of work for some time, and will not be able to work for some unpredictable amount of time going forward. Soren’s stroke of several years ago (followed closely on this site) makes it very difficult for him to earn any income, though he does have some disability income.

Their need is great, and is not likely to get any less great for many months. I’m asking this community for donations to help them survive this period. I have set up a unique gmail address (velmascraps@gmail.com) for nothing other than taking Paypal donations and communicating with me and a team of supporters about this issue.

If you can’t/don’t use Paypal, you can email me at the velmascraps address and we can discuss other means of getting money to them. Since we’re hoping to cover their needs for several months, some people may want to donate a lump sum to spread out over that time, and other people may want to send monthly small amounts. PLEASE, no one give anything that will affect your own ability to get along.

I have been unable to identify any online services that will track monthly donations and reminders (if anyone knows of one, please tell me!). If you would like to make a monthly donation, someone will send you an email reminder around the 25th of each month. If you need to halt your donations, just let me know.

Please pass this along to anyone who you think knows them or might otherwise help, but who doesn’t read Making Light.

And thank you in advance for your generosity, whether in the form of money or good wishes and good thoughts. They need those too.

July 21, 2014
I dreamed a Wikipedia entry
Posted by Patrick at 11:42 PM * 11 comments

I dreamed a Wikipedia entry. It was about William Rowse Sitcup, a deservedly obscure figure in the history of colonial Virginia. Born to a family long established in James County, young William grew up living a life of the mind. For reasons imperfectly understood, by adolescence he became obsessed with the geographical details of Virginia itself—its tidewater region, its Piedmont, its rugged western mountains, its long Shenandoah valley, and all the individual counties. He became convinced that the Dominion had been, in its physical shape and political subdivisions, ordained by God as a perfect miniature of the greater world outside. (The fact that Virginia contains no deserts, no year-round snowcaps, no rainforest, and no permafrost seems never to have impinged on young Rowse’s—he went by his middle name—frenzy of hermetic insight.) On reaching his majority, he came into an inheritance that gave him a modest level of financial independence, and allowed him to pursue his dream of visiting all of Virginia’s counties—this is when “Virginia” included what are now the states of West Virginia and Kentucky—in order to deliver a series of lectures to be offered to the public in each of them, elucidating to no-doubt-thunderstruck audiences his vision of the Dominion as a divinely-wrought miniature of the great world, hammered out on God’s anvil as a benign but distinctly pedagogical message to erring humanity. It goes without saying that, in Rowse’s worldview, the institution of slavery was assumed to be part of the divine plan. It is peculiar, then, that on his visit to Ohio County, in that portion of then-Virginia which stuck like a northern-pointing spear between Pennsylvania and Ohio, Rowse was on several occasions heard to express sympathy and support for slaves who had managed to cross the Ohio and light out for freedom. Whether he actually met any is lost to history. Little is known of him following this sojourn beyond the mountains; he died under mysterious circumstances in Palmyra on his way back to his familiar Tidewater home. After much pressure from his family’s solicitor, the inkeeper returned Rowse’s portfolio of manuscripts, but when it was opened in the parlor of the family’s old manor, all that remained was a fall of ash and the smell of rosemary. Citation needed.

July 18, 2014
Penny Dreadful: The Mysterious Affair of the SPOILERS
Posted by Abi Sutherland at 03:26 AM * 9 comments

Once again, I am writing a spoiler thread for a show I haven’t watched. It does protect me from inadvertently spoiling it in the OP, at least.

Reading up on it on the internet, it sounds like a good argument for public domain: the opportunity to recast and reconsider classic figures from literature and popular culture. In a funny kind of way, I’m grateful that Sherlock Holmes’ status is still up in the air in some jurisdictions, since otherwise, I’d worry that his all but inevitable presence would distort the show.

But I digress. Here’s a chance to discuss the show, the characters, the plots, and the possibilities without needing to ROT-13 anything.

July 10, 2014
Singularities in the rearview mirror
Posted by Abi Sutherland at 06:58 AM * 107 comments

Writing at io9 recently, Charlie Jane Anders mentioned Jo Walton’s 2009 essay on tor.com, which discussed George Eliot as a pre-SF writer who dealt with SF themes and topics. From the tor.com essay:

She saw how technology changes society—she understood that thoroughly. In a way, she was someone who had lived through a singularity—she had seen the railroad coming and had seen how it had entirely transformed the world she grew up in, with second order effects nobody could have predicted. Her books constantly come back to technology and the changes it brings.

I was emailing back and forth with Serge, and he mentioned a series he’s been enjoying lately: Halt and Catch Fire. It’s not SF, in the sense that it’s not postulating an unknown technology. Rather, like Middlemarch, it’s an examination of the impact of a real technological change on a pre-existing society. It is, if you will, looking at that particular view out the side-windows or the rearview mirror rather than the windscreen.

I think this particular sub-category of liminal, not-quite-SF storytelling is interesting, for the same reasons that I’m interested in the SFnal flavor of the real-world terraforming efforts that I see around me in the Netherlands. I think they can inform our thinking, both about change and about the ways our genre deals with change. Also, it’s neat.

What other stories are there in this area? And where else, on the borderlands of our genre, are there similar caches?

(Thanks, Serge, for suggesting that this would make a good blog post.)

June 26, 2014
Open thread 198
Posted by Abi Sutherland at 03:29 PM * 793 comments

There are many ways that the Dutch are unusual about bicyles. The one that struck me most recently, though, is nomenclature.

Most terms that I know of for this device fall into four rough categories:

  1. Borrowings and derivatives of the French vélocipede, or “fast foot thingie”
  2. Borrowings and derivatives of the German Fahrrad, or “travel wheel” (including the less-common Dutch term, rijwiel)
  3. Borrowings and derivatives of the English bicycle*
  4. Terms that belong to the Emperor Comprehensible exceptions, such as the Polish Rower, which comes from the proper name of a bicycle manufacturer

The Dutch term, fiets (pronounced as an English speaker would say “feats”), doesn’t appear to fit into any of those categories. Indeed, it’s one of the biggest etymological mysteries of the language, which results in an Etymologie section of the Dutch Wikipedia page stretching over nearly 600 words. The seven paragraphs lovingly detail the dialect terms in various regions of the Netherlands, several French words that could have been corrupted into the word, and the identities of manufacturers whose names sound similar, before giving up and admitting that nobody knows†.

The only analagous etymological mystery of national importance I can think of is America.


* Of course it’s made up of Latin and Greek terms. What could be more English than a bastard assembly of morphemes from several foreign languages whose original speakers would never have considered using them in conjunction with one another?
† It does not, alas, include the theory that Martin advanced, which is that it’s onomatopoeic, possibly from the sound of trouser legs brusing against one another. My response was that an onomatopoeic term for a bicycle in Amsterdam would be thunkRATTLEscrapeSQUEAK.

Continued from Open thread 197.

June 14, 2014
My Real Children Spoiler and Speculation Thread
Posted by Abi Sutherland at 09:31 AM * 107 comments

By popular request, a thread where you do not have to ROT-13 your speculations about why the book ended the way it did…and what happened next.

I will copy and rotate the thread of the discussion as best I can into comments here. Don’t be too surprised to see comments added to your (view all by) as part of the process; they’ll be linked, labeled, and backed up, but since they’re you’re words, you get to own ‘em.

Needless to say, this thread is full of spoilers.

June 10, 2014
Published today: California Bones, Greg Van Eekhout’s wild heist caper set in a literally eat-or-be-eaten LA
Posted by Patrick at 05:58 PM * 36 comments

CaliforniaBones.jpg On sale today in hardcover and e-book. Opening three chapters here! Special dedicated website here! Tour schedule here! “Big Idea” post on John Scalzi’s Whatever here!

My flap copy:

“Our bodies are cauldrons,” he said, “and we become the magic we consume.”

When Daniel Blackland was six, he ingested his first bone fragment, a bit of kraken spine plucked out of the sand during a visit with his demanding, brilliant, and powerful magician father, Sebastian.

When Daniel was twelve, he watched Sebastian die at the hands of the Hierarch of Southern California, devoured for the heightened magic layered deep within his bones.

Now, years later, Daniel is a petty thief with a forged identity. Hiding amid the crowds in Los Angeles—the capital of the Kingdom of Southern California—Daniel is trying to go straight. But his crime-boss uncle has a heist he wants Daniel to perform: break into the Hierarch’s storehouse of magical artifacts and retrieve Sebastian’s sword, an object of untold power.

For this dangerous mission, Daniel will need a team he can rely on, so he brings in his closest friends from his years in the criminal world. There’s Moth, who can take a bullet and heal in mere minutes. Jo Alverado, illusionist. The multitalented Cassandra, Daniel’s ex. And, new to them all, the enigmatic, knowledgeable Emma, with her British accent and her own grudge against the powers-that-be. The stakes are high, and the stage is set for a showdown that might just break the magic that protects a long-corrupt regime.



Extravagant and yet moving, California Bones is an epic adventure set in a city of canals and secrets and casual brutality—different from the world we know, yet familiar and true.

Some advance reviews and quotes:

“Great story, great characters, and a truly cool/creepy alternate Los Angeles built on magic, blood, and bone. This took me to places I didn’t expect. I like books that do that. You’ll like this, too.”
—Steven Brust

“I both love and am terrified by Greg Van Eekhout’s vision of Los Angeles. I already want to go back.”
—John Scalzi

“L.A. noir as dark as La Brea tar meets magic drawn from ancient bones.”
—Steven Gould

“It’s got subterranean halls with pillars of bones, a magic sword, magical duels and some of the coolest bone magic ever, but that’s all interwoven with the taste of an LA burrito, the concrete waterways of Los Angeles, and the neon glow of the Ferris wheel on the Santa Monica Pier. Van Eekhout has written a 21st century alchemy.”
—Maureen F. McHugh

“Wonderfully imaginative…The story is structured like a caper novel, and fans of stories about heists will enjoy it, but its fantastical elements make it an absolute must for urban fantasy readers, too.”
Booklist (starred review)

“In Van Eekhout’s first hardcover for adult readers, a combination of caper novel and urban fantasy packs a wallop. Daniel and his team banter even while up to their necks in danger, and the magic system in which eating the bones and flesh of creatures can grant you their power is unique and fascinating (if a little icky). Highly recommended.”
Library Journal (starred review)

“Set in an alternate Los Angeles ruled by authoritarian sorcerers and corporate moguls, California Bones is an engrossing story about political malevolence. But it’s also a caper about the ultimate magical heist. You won’t be able to put it down….This is a book about what happens when magic is just another weapon in the arsenal of a dictator—and in the pockets of his rivals. It’s action-packed and intense to the last, bringing in weird twists that add psychological complexity to the fireballs and earthquake fights. California Bones reaches a satisfying conclusion, though you can tell there’s more to come—and indeed, Tor will soon be releasing the sequel, Pacific Fire.”
—Annalee Newitz, io9.com

(PNH: I said that I was going to more regularly post about my and Teresa’s editorial projects on their dates of publication. But I want to add that I really love this one, for its crazily reimagined Los Angeles and for its lovably snarky ensemble cast. And honest to God, having also read books two and three, I can honestly say they get even better and even better. Greg is great.)

June 01, 2014
Open thread 197
Posted by Teresa at 09:25 AM *

Widely disseminated science joke from the early internet:

An engineer, a physicist, and a mathematician find themselves in an anecdote—indeed, an anecdote quite similar to many you have no doubt already heard.

After some observations and rough calculations, the engineer realizes the situation and starts laughing. A few minutes later, the physicist understands too. He chuckles to himself happily, as he now has enough experimental evidence to publish a paper.

This leaves the mathematician somewhat perplexed, as he had observed right away that he was the subject of an anecdote, and deduced quite rapidly the presence of humor from its similarity to other anecdotes; but he considers this anecdote to be too trivial a corollary to be significant, let alone funny.

Continued from Open thread 196. Continued in Open thread 198

May 27, 2014
X-Men: SPOILERS of Future Past
Posted by Abi Sutherland at 02:41 PM * 44 comments

Once again, I find myself opening a discussion thread for a film I haven’t seen. While this allows me to safely avoid any spoilers in the original post (a good thing), it does also give me free rein to imagine what those spoilers might be (a thing of dubious value).

IMDB tells me this film depicts how “the X-Men send Wolverine to the past in a desperate effort to change history and prevent an event that results in doom for both humans and mutants.”

Now, for my money, it’s not a proper time travel story if it doesn’t involve at least one of the following elements:

  • A blue box
  • Robert Lansing holding a cat
  • a dead grandparent
  • transparent aluminum
  • the Bishop’s Bird-Stump
  • a DeLorean
  • a rabbit costume
  • Eloi and Morlocks; Tanu and Firvulag
  • miller-guns
  • something unpleasant in a microwave oven

I am now imagining Wolverine using all of the above items to fulfil his mission. Quick, while I’m distracted, discuss the movie!

May 26, 2014
Zerika
Posted by Teresa at 10:17 AM * 32 comments

zerika.jpg

Hamster in her ball
maps the world by smell and sound:
eager, alert, blind.
Zerika is sufficiently intrepid that it took us weeks to realize she can’t see much more than dark vs. light, and then only if it’s very close to her.

Actually, it was Pippin Macdonald who figured it out during a weekend visit. Patrick and I had had suspicions, but hadn’t yet put it all together. Among other things, it explains why Zeek, alone among all our hamsters, has moved all her cage furniture: she navigates by following the walls.

(Photo: Zerika, with her elegant Siamese-cat fur and her very curious nose. She loves her hamsterball.)

Socializing a blind hamster is an interesting challenge.

As far as I can tell, Zeek doesn’t think this is tragic. She thinks she’s having a good time.

Copyright 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 by Patrick & Teresa Nielsen Hayden. All rights reserved.