Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Harriet Guymon

Harriet Guymon

Female 1851 - 1942  (90 years)

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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Harriet GuymonHarriet Guymon was born on 11 Nov 1851 in Springville, Utah, Utah (daughter of Noah Thomas Guymon and Margaret Johnson); died on 18 May 1942 in Safford, Graham, Arizona; was buried in Safford Cemetery, Graham, Arizona.

    Harriet married Hyrum Oscar Crandall on 25 Oct 1869 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. Hyrum (son of Myron Nathan Crandall and Tryphena Bisbee) was born on 26 Apr 1844 in La Harpe, Hancock, Illinois; died on 29 Apr 1904 in Driggs, Teton, Idaho; was buried in Driggs Cemetery, Driggs, Teton, Idaho. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. Myron Marcellus Crandall was born on 2 Oct 1875 in Springville, Utah, Utah; died on 11 May 1951 in Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona; was buried in Mesa City Cemetery, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Noah Thomas GuymonNoah Thomas Guymon was born on 30 Jun 1819 in Jackson, Tennessee (son of Thomas Guymon and Sarah Gordon); died on 7 Jan 1911 in Orangeville, Emery, Utah; was buried in Orangeville City Cemetery, Orangeville, Emery, Utah.

    Notes:

    Bodyguard to Joseph Smith. Present at the meeting following Smith's death when Brigham Young "was transfigured so that he looked and sounded like the Prophet Joseph Smith."

    NOAH THOMAS GUYMON

    Compiled by Olive Guymon Stone, granddaughter

    This history is taken from histories written from descendents of Noah Thomas Guymon, from ward records, from the diary of Noah Thomas Guymon, the Church chronology, American Fork history and Church history. It is also taken from children's biographies.

    Noah Thomas Guymon was the fifth child of Thomas Guymon and Sarah Gordon Guymon. He was born 30 June 1819 at Jackson County, Tennessee. His parents were both descendants of Revolutionary War ancestors. Noah Thomas Guymon was born with the blood of a noble ancestry of courage, devotion and stamina of true Americans of which our Guymon family can be very proud.

    Noah Thomas Guymon was fortunate in having a father who was a good farmer and a good schoolteacher. From his father he received a good rounded basic education. He also knew the fundamentals of farming and the raising of livestock.

    In the early spring of 1826 the family moved to Edgar County, Illinois. Here they lived a rather peaceful life until James Guymon, a brother just older than Noah Thomas, came home from a trip, which changed the whole course of their lives. This happened during the winter of 1836-1837. James was very excited and told them of a new church; different from any other church they had ever known. When he had finished telling his story, their father stood upon a log and said, "Jim, this is the gospel of Jesus Christ. It is just what we have been looking for." Noah Thomas, James, their younger brother and four sisters and their parents soon joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Noah Thomas was baptized 02 March 1836 by Elder Calob Baldwin. From this time on, the family went through much of the persecutions, which had to be endured by the members of the Church.

    Noah Thomas knew the Prophet Joseph Smith and acted as one of his bodyguards. He told his children of being in the Sacred Grove and hearing the Prophet Joseph Smith telling the Saints that the time would come when they would be driven to the Rocky Mountains. He bore his testimony in a conference in Orangeville, telling of a meeting conducted by Brigham Young, when Brigham Young was transfigured so that he looked and sounded like the Prophet Joseph Smith. This to him was proof that Brigham Young was chosen by God to lead the Saints after the death of the Prophet.

    Noah Thomas married Mary Dickerson Dudley on 24 December 1837 in Caldwell County, Missouri. She was the daughter of James Dudley and Celia Ross Dudley both from Richmond, Virginia. Mary was born 13 August 1814 at Wolf Creek, Hardin County, Kentucky. They were married by Elder Jefferson Hunt. Their first child was born 25 October 1838 at Caldwell County, Missouri, near Far West, on the night of the Crooked River Battle when David Patton was killed. This child was a girl whom they named Mary Jane.

    In the winter of 1838 Noah T. and his family with the rest of the Saints, moved to the state of Illinois, where Noah T. helped in the building of the city of Nauvoo. Here on the 10th of September 1840 Noah Thomas' second child Lucinda Harris was born. And 08 July 1842 their third child Emma Melissa was born.

    Times were hard and Noah Thomas moved his family out into the country on a small farm. Therefore, they were not living in Nauvoo when the Prophet Joseph Smith was killed; in fact, Noah Thomas was sick in bed with a high fever.

    On the first day of March 1845 Mary Dickerson Dudley died from complications due to childbirth. She was taken to Nauvoo for burial. This left Noah Thomas with little motherless girls who needed care and attention. Ten months later [on the] 24th of November 1845, Noah Thomas Guymon married Margaret Johnson, daughter of Edward Johnson and Sarah Brown Johnson. To this union were born four daughters and three sons.

    12th February 1847 Noah Thomas married his third wife, Elizabeth Ann Jones at Winter Quarters. She was a daughter of James Nylor Jones and Sarah Ann Manerly. They were married by Brigham Young.

    Noah Thomas Guymon and his three little girls from his first wife, his wife Margaret with her first two children and Elizabeth (his third wife) and her little son left Council Bluffs, Iowa in the spring of 1850 to make their long journey across the plains to Utah. They came to Utah in the Aaron Johnson Company. There were other members of his family in the same company. They were his parents and their daughter Melissa who was still single. His sister Barzilla and her husband Matthew Caldwell and their small children. There was his sister Polly and her husband Robert Lewis Johnson and their small children. There were many preparations, which had to be made for so long a journey. Wagons had to be made ready, cows and oxen had to be trained to work on the wagons and clothing had to be made for wearing on the trip. All their belongings had to be packed and those things they could not take had to be sold or given away. There was much work and planning went into the preparations for the long journey to a new home in the wilderness where they would be free to worship God as they wished. They were very happy with the thought of coming to Utah where they would no longer be persecuted by the mobs.

    The most pleasant part of this journey was spent traveling along the banks of the Missouri River. The company crossed the river on flat boats and the cattle swam the river. They gathered buffalo chips to make fires on the prairie lands. The company traveled long hard hours but they always took time out at night to sing songs of praise to their God and to enjoy each other's company around the campfire before retiring for the evening.

    Three days before the end of their journey, James Guymon the older brother of Noah Thomas came to meet them. James had made the journey a year before and was anxious to see his parents, brother and sisters and their families. The children were driving the cattle a short distance ahead of the wagons and when they saw their Uncle James coming to meet them, they shouted with joy. This was indeed a happy reunion.

    Finally, they arrived at Salt Lake City, very tired but happy to be at the end of their journey and with their friends of the Church. One of the things that impressed the children was a red rag on a stick nailed upon a log room to show that merchandise was sold there. Another log room had a tin cup nailed over the door to show that tine ware was sold at the place.

    The family had arrived in Salt Lake City 12 September 1850. They spent their first week with James who lived on the Little Cottonwood River. He had a lovely garden, which furnished good eating for these tired and hungry travelers.

    Noah Thomas, Matthew Caldwell, Azamiah Adams and Henry Chipman went to American Fork. The history of American Fork says that Noah Thomas Guymon built the first house and his daughter Clarissa Ellen Guymon was the first child born in American Fork.

    Noah Thomas with the assistance of his family cleared the brush and willows from a small farm and he built a house, which was built of logs, and the roof was covered with small poles on which cane was laid. When this was finished, Noah Thomas, his brother in law, Matthew Caldwell and Azamiah Adams went to Salt Lake City to work for wheat, potatoes and other supplies they would need to carry them through the winter and to plant in the spring. Brother Adams had left his family in Salt Lake City and intended to move them out on his return. Adams left his young son there with the new settlers. He and brother Chipman were the only male members left to protect their wives and children while they were away.

    The day after their departure Chief Walker and a large number of his Indian braves came and pitched their tents or wickieups as they were called, near the little new homes which these new settlers had just finished. The settlers were upset by their arrival so brother Chipman went down and had a talk with the Chief. The Chief said they were friendly and that he and some of his lesser chiefs were on their way to Salt Lake City to see and talk with the Great White Chief, Brigham Young. The Chief said his Indian braves would hunt, fish, gather acorns and turn their horses on the low lands to feed. He told his braves not to molest the white people. Nevertheless, the women and children were very much afraid. Some of the Indians were very annoying. They would come into their cabins and help themselves to whatever they wanted such as milk or anything they could see that they wanted to eat. As the cows had helped pull the wagons across the plains and had given milk all summer, they were about dry now. These settlers needed the little milk they got from the cows to soak the hard bread they had left. Their provisions were getting scarce. They had hauled what they did have over a thousand miles in one wagon. When a big Indian brave would come into their cabin and pick up a pan of milk, drink what he wanted and pass it to another Indian to finish drinking, the Guymon family knew they would have to eat their bread dry. Still they were very thankful to their Heavenly Father for his protecting care over them, for they realized they could all have been killed and their belongs taken or destroyed.

    Noah Thomas Guymon was away from his family three weeks. He had got the chance to work for one of his friends, William Casper thrashing out wheat, digging potatoes and hauling some lumber from the canyon. He also sold some things he had brought with him; thus, he was able to obtain enough potatoes, corn and wheat for their winter's needs and enough seeds for their spring planting. This was the last of November 1850. They stayed here that first winter. In the late fall of 1851 they moved to Springville. Here his children were able to attend school in a log house inside the fort.

    In October 1852 Noah Thomas attended the General Conference of the Church in Salt Lake City. At this conference he was called to go on a mission to England. As soon as he could get the proper clothing for the journey he left for his mission. He left his home in the company of Elder Spence (? Spicer) Crandall on 09 September 1852 to go to Salt Lake to receive special instructions before starting their journey. There were one hundred elders all leaving for missions to the nations of the earth. They left Salt Lake the 15th September 1852 in five wagons and arrived at Fort Bridger on the 22nd of September. There they joined a company of 22 more wagons. Orson Pratt, one of the Twelve Apostles and Daniel Spencer were in this group.

    He had a successful mission. Copies of letters he wrote state how successful they were and how the Lord took such good care of the missionaries that went. Without purse or script, they did not want for food or a place to lay their head. Noah was very grateful for the good care he had had and for the many converts made in England.

    In the diary of Noah Thomas Guymon it says, "We have chartered a ship named, 'Juvants,' and it was to sail 30 March to bring 33 converts to America." On 01 April 1855 Elder Glover, who had been appointed president of the company, called a meeting in regard to the best policy for keeping good order. They divided the passengers on board into twelve wards and Noah Thomas was appointed president of the first ward. On 06 April they held a General Conference on board this ship and sustained the general authorities of the Church. Many were sick during the journey. 06 May 1855 they reached the mouth of the Delaware River and they landed at Philadelphia at 10 o'clock that night. They reached Atchison, Kansas 27 May and 28 May they went to Mormon Grove.

    31st May and 01, 02 June they organized for crossing the plains with Noah Thomas Sergeant of the Guard of the 2nd Company. 14 June 1855 they started on their journey across the plains. The 10th of August they passed Fort Kerney and 28th August they camped at Fort Bridger. They arrived in Salt Lake City with many Saints and 58 wagons on 07 September 1855. Noah Thomas reported to the Church authorities and gave a full report of his mission and then hurried home to Springville to his family. He arrived there 10 September 1855 after having been away almost three years. He was sick with Mountain Fever on his return and was ill for several weeks.

    Wednesday, 20 May 1857, the 51st Quorum of Seventies was organized at Springville, Utah with Noah Thomas Guymon as the President. In September 1884 the 81st Quorum of Seventies was organized in Emery County by Seymour B. Young with Noah T. Guymon as one of the Presidents. Noah Thomas was a bishop's counselor in Fountain Green for a number of years. Robert L. Johnson, his brother in law was the bishop.

    While in England, the Rowley home was always open to elders. Here Noah T. became acquainted with the Rowley family and Louisa Rowley, the oldest daughter. This Rowley family emigrated to Utah in the year 1856. 02 March 1857 Noah Thomas Guymon married Louisa Rowley. She was the daughter of William Rowley and Ann Jewell Rowley. They were married by Brigham Young in his office in Salt Lake City.

    In about 1863 Noah Thomas moved his family to Fairview, Sanpete County, Utah. In 1867 he moved his family to Fountain Green, Sanpete County, Utah shortly after he became counselor to Bishop Robert L. Johnson. He held this position until 1879 when he moved his family to Castle Valley.

    Noah moved Elizabeth Ann Jones Guymon and her family to Orangeville, Emery County, Utah. He moved Louisa Rowley Guymon and her family to Huntington, Emery County, Utah. He and the boys built Louisa's first home in Mountain Dale. It was clay hills close to the Huntington River. They dug a room or a cellar back in the hill with a lean-to at the opening of the cellar. The lean-to was built by standing poles upright. Willows were put across the top for a roof with leaves and mud on top of the willows for a roof. Small windows were made with heavy greased paper. An old tub was used as stove for cooking and to heat their home. This home was called a dugout. This was a temporary home where they lived while Noah Thomas and the boys hauled logs from Huntington Canyon and built a log house in the northeast part of Huntington. It was nice and comfortable home for those days. Here Louisa gave birth to one more child, Franklin Noah Guymon, born 1883. He was Louisa' twelfth child and Noah's twenty-eighth child.

    Noah Thomas spent part of time in Huntington and part of his time in Orangeville with his third wife until the Manifesto. He then moved to Orangeville and made his home with his third wife.

    At the time of the Manifesto, one morning a neighbor came and told Louisa that soldier from the United States Army was in town looking for the men that were practicing polygamy. The neighbor said, "You had better keep your children inside so they cannot be questioned." However, Louisa needed something from the store, so she sent her youngest daughter Laura to the store. She instructed Laura to say, "I don't know," if anyone should try to question her. Sure enough, the soldier saw and questioned the child. He asked, "Who is your Dad, little girl?" Laura answered, "I don't know." "Where do you live," he asked. "I don't know," Laura replied. "Where is your father?" he asked. "I don't know." Little girl, what is your name?" Again Laura replied, "I don't know." "Oh, you dumb little thing," the soldier said with disgust and rode away.

    When Noah Thomas left his youngest family in Huntington, he left them with stock in the Huntington Co-op Store, a general store where they sold everything from yard goods to molasses, pots and pans to farm machinery. This stock declared dividends each January, which kept the children in clothes. He also left a farm, which the boys farmed.

    His declining years were spent in Orangeville, Emery County, Utah. Until a few months before his death he took care of a small garden and milked a cow. He had lived an active life. He had helped organize cooperation stores in Fountain Green, Orangeville and Huntington. He was successful with mercantile business, farming and livestock.

    He died 07 January 1911 at the age of 92 years in Orangeville, Emery, Utah. He was the father of twenty-eight children. He is buried in the Orangeville Cemetery.

    Noah married Margaret Johnson on 24 Nov 1845 in Orangeville, Emery, Utah. Margaret (daughter of Edward Johnson and Sarah Frances Brown) was born on 28 Feb 1821 in London, Middlesex, Ontario; died on 17 Dec 1900 in Driggs, Teton, Idaho. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Margaret JohnsonMargaret Johnson was born on 28 Feb 1821 in London, Middlesex, Ontario (daughter of Edward Johnson and Sarah Frances Brown); died on 17 Dec 1900 in Driggs, Teton, Idaho.

    Notes:

    From Find a Grave:

    HISTORY OF MARGARET JOHNSON GUYMON

    Margaret Johnson was born 28 February 1821 in Springfield, Elgin (then the London District,) Ontario, Canada, the youngest daughter of Edward Johnson and Sarah Brown, Irish immigrants. Upon hearing the doctrines of the LDS church preached to them, Edward and his family were baptized in 1836, moving to Missouri to be with the body of the Saints when Margaret was 12 years old. In Missouri, Margaret's mother and sister Elizabeth died and her father married Percy Baldwin Curtis, a widow. The family moved to Lima, Illinois and then to Nauvoo after 1841, living in the 4th Ward. Margaret Johnson and her brother, Robert Lewis Johnson made a home together prior to Robert's marriage to Polly Ann Guymon 30 April 1846 in Nauvoo.

    Ten months after Noah Thomas Guymon's wife, Mary Dickersen Dudley, died following childbirth, he and Margaret Johnson were married on 25 November 1845 in Nauvoo. Their home was a on a farm outside of Nauvoo. In 1846 Noah's sister Polly Ann Guymon married Margaret's brother, Robert Lewis Johnson.

    The Guymon family moved with the body of the Saints to Pottawattamie County, Iowa where Margaret's first two children were born in the town of Kanesville. These children were Margaret Elizabeth Guymon born 19 September 1846 and Martin Lewis Guymon born 24 January 1849.

    12th of June 1850 Noah Thomas Guymon's family left Council Bluffs, Iowa for Utah in the Aaron Johnson Wagon Train. The Guymon family now consisted of Noah's three daughters by his first marriage, Margaret and her two children and his third wife, Elizabeth Ann Jones and her son, William Albert Guymon. They were fortunate to travel with Noah's parents and Margaret's brother, Robert. They arrived in Salt Lake City, 12 September 1850, staying with Noah's brother, James who had a home in the Little Cottonwood area of the valley. Their visit was brief however, as Brigham Young had designated eight wagons from their company to continue their journey into Utah Valley and settle there. Noah erected one of the first homes in what is now American Fork, Utah. The home was made of logs; the roof of poles on which cane was laid. In October 1851 he moved the family to a farm near Springville, Utah. His children were able to attend a school inside the fort. It was here that he was called on a mission to England for three years from 13 September 1852 to 10 September 1855.

    During Noah's absence there was trouble with the Indians. Margaret moved her family into the town of Springville for protection. Margaret had to support herself and her extended family while Noah was gone. This she did by teaching school and sewing for other people. She raised food in her garden and carded, spun, dyed and wove her own wool cloth into clothes for the children. She purchased a lot and had home built and paid for through her earnings when her husband came home three years later. It was in Springville that the remainder of Margaret's children were born.

    Seeking greener pastures, Noah, Margaret, Elizabeth and a 4th wife Louisa Rowley moved to Fairview, Sanpete County, Utah and again in 1867 to Fountain Green, Sanpete County, Utah. Here the family seemed to be content until 1879 when exploration of Castle Valley yielded good reports and it was decided to move there. Margaret now 60 years old, did not join the exodus there but moved back to Springville. For the next twenty years she lived in her children's homes, especially that of her daughter Julia Maycock.

    On 17 December 1900 Margaret Johnson Guymon died in Driggs, Teton County, Idaho while visiting her daughter Margaret Elizabeth Crandall. Her body was shipped home to Springville where she is buried in the Springville Cemetery. An inscription on her tombstone reads: "Our mother we hope to meet you when the cares of life are through." Margaret remained faithful throughout her life to the teachings of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

    Children:
    1. Margaret Elizabeth Guymon was born on 29 Sep 1846 in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa; died on 15 Jan 1929 in Driggs, Teton, Idaho.
    2. 1. Harriet Guymon was born on 11 Nov 1851 in Springville, Utah, Utah; died on 18 May 1942 in Safford, Graham, Arizona; was buried in Safford Cemetery, Graham, Arizona.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Thomas Guymon was born on 10 Mar 1787 in Surry County, North Carolina (son of Isaiah Guymon and Elizabeth Flynn); died on 20 Oct 1855 in Springville, Utah, Utah; was buried in Springville City Cemetery, Springville, Utah, Utah.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: 10 Mar 1787, Stokes, North Carolina

    Notes:

    Moved to Jackson County, Tennessee around 1815, where they lived about ten years. In Tennessee he taught school and ran a ferry over the Cumberland. Moved to Paris, Edgar, Illinois sometime in the mid-1820s. Along with much of his family (save for his sons Isaiah, John, and William, who never joined), he was baptized into the LDS church in 1835. In the same year, he was ordained a priest and appointed to lead the Edgar County branch of the church. In 1838 he was a member of the high council in Far West, Caldwell, Missouri. He had moved to Hancock county, Illinois by 1840. According to his Find a Grave entry, he went on a church mission to North Carolina in 1844. Emigrated to Deseret with the Aaron Johnson Company wagon train in 1850.

    Thomas married Sarah Gordon on 23 Feb 1809 in Stokes, North Carolina. Sarah (daughter of John Gordon and Barzilla Martin) was born in 1789 in Stokes, North Carolina; died on 7 Dec 1872 in Fountain Green, Sanpete, Utah; was buried in Springville City Cemetery, Springville, Utah, Utah. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  Sarah GordonSarah Gordon was born in 1789 in Stokes, North Carolina (daughter of John Gordon and Barzilla Martin); died on 7 Dec 1872 in Fountain Green, Sanpete, Utah; was buried in Springville City Cemetery, Springville, Utah, Utah.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: 20 Nov 1791, Stokes, North Carolina

    Notes:

    Also called Sallie.

    From "Sarah Gordon Guymon," by Olive Guymon Stone:

    Sarah was the oldest of John Gordon's and Barzilla Martin's children. She was born 20 November 1789 in Surry County, North Carolina. Being the oldest of twelve children Sarah had many responsibilities; helping her mother with the children, making beds and helping her mother in the tavern. She had a busy life and never knew an idle moment.

    Sarah married Thomas Guymon in Stokes County, North Carolina the 23rd day of February 1809. He was the son of Isaiah Guymon and Elizabeth Flynn. He was an ambitious young man, who farmed in the summer months and taught school in the winter. They lived in Stokes County, North Carolina for six years. During that time three sons: Isaiah, John and William were born to them. They moved to Jackson County, Tennessee in 1815. Here they had three more sons: James, Noah Thomas and Martin and one daughter Barzilla. Ten years later they moved again, this time to Edgar County, Illinois in 1825. While living here they had four daughters: Elizabeth, Polly Ann, Sarah Jane and Melissa Jane.

    Sarah and her husband were converted to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1836 and soon joined with the Saints and were with them in all their persecutions. Their son James came to Utah in 1849 and a year later in the spring of 1850 Thomas and Sarah Guymon with their daughter Melissa Jane, their son Noah Thomas, his wife Margaret Johnson and children, their daughter Polly Ann and her husband Robert Johnson and their children, all came to Utah with the Aaron Johnson Company. Their three eldest sons however, did not come to Utah. The family with others made many preparations for the journey to Utah. Among other things, they had to train or break cows to lead on a wagon of three yoke of oxen.

    The most pleasant part of their journey was spent traveling along the banks of the Missouri River. The company crossed the river on flat boats and the cattle swam the river. They gathered buffalo chips to make fires in the prairie lands. The company traveled long hard hours but they always took time out at night to sing songs of praise and enjoyed one another's company before retiring.

    Three days before the end of this journey their son James came to meet them. The children were driving the cattle ahead of the wagons and when they saw their Uncle James coming they shouted for joy. The shouts of joy soon rang through the entire company. Thomas and Sarah were indeed happy to see their son and the company was glad to see someone they knew for now they were sure that their long journey would soon be at an end. Finally they arrived at the little town of Salt Lake City on the 12 September 1850. One of the sights that impressed the children was a red flag on a stick nailed up on a log room to show that merchandise was sold there and another log room with a tin cup outside to show that tin was sold there.

    They spent their first week with James, who lived on the Little Cottonwood River. He had a lovely garden, which furnished good eating for the new arrivals to the valley. The married children moved down into Utah County all except James, who moved down some time later. Thomas and Sarah spend their first winter in Salt Lake Valley.

    Sarah had a very quick temper and was very determined about getting her own way when she felt she was right. The people in Salt Lake Valley were told to take their dry cows in the herd and let the herder take them to Antelope Island, which is an island in the Great Salt Lake. Sarah felt it was wrong to let her cows be sent over there for the winter. The herder came and put her cows in with the rest of the herd. She was very determined that her cows were not going so she came out with her cane for a switch and turned her cows out of the herd and took them home. The cows had to be herded all the time. She must have known what she was doing for the other cows froze to death and her cows furnished milk for her family and many more settlers.

    Sarah not only loved her children very much but she was fond of her brothers and sisters. We have found many instances where she was close to the son of her sister; his name was Calvin Stone who lived in Utah. We also have evidence that she corresponded with her family back in North Carolina. Among the letters written to her youngest brother Martin was found a document giving Martin the Power of Attorney and a letter asking him to sell her land, which was left her by her father. Her father was a wealthy man at the time of his death. Her oldest brother James was the Administrator of the Estate. This letter to Martin was 28 February 1870. In this same letter she stated that her health was very poor and that she was living with her son Noah Thomas and that he was taking care of all her business affairs.

    After Noah Thomas moved to Springville, Thomas and Sarah moved to Springville. Here her husband Thomas died 20 October 1855. After his death Sarah moved to Fountain Green to be near her children there. She lived in a home of her own and had a girl named Martha Jane Park lived with her to keep her company. She lived the last few years with her son Noah Thomas. Here she died on 07 December 1872, at the age of 91 years. She was taken to Springville for burial beside her husband.

    Children:
    1. 2. Noah Thomas Guymon was born on 30 Jun 1819 in Jackson, Tennessee; died on 7 Jan 1911 in Orangeville, Emery, Utah; was buried in Orangeville City Cemetery, Orangeville, Emery, Utah.

  3. 6.  Edward Johnson was born on 17 Aug 1785 in Armagh, Armagh, Ireland (son of John Johnson); died on 18 Apr 1872 in Preparation, Monona, Iowa; was buried in Preparation Cemetery, Monona, Iowa.

    Notes:

    With his wife Sarah Brown, baptized into the LDS church in 1836. Baptism performed by Orson Pratt. [Findagrave.com]

    Membership of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1830-1848 has him born 17 Aug 1785 in Armagh, son of John Johnson; living in London, Ontario in 1813; "Baptism Date: 1836, Ordained High Priest." It also has him married to Sarah Brown (no further information about her) and comments that "Edward was listed among the Nauvoo members."

    Early Members of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints says that "Edward Johnson resided at London, Ontario, Canada, in 1813. He joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1836. He was ordained a high priest and was listed among the Nauvoo members. He was baptized and confirmed a member of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints by E. C. Briggs and G. R. Outhouse." This source also agrees that he was born in Armagh and gives a birthdate of "Aug 1785".

    Sources cited by Early Members of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints:

    Early Reorganization Minutes, 1852-1871, Book A, pp. 85, 141, 351, 507

    Saints' Herald Obituaries, 1872, p. 478

    Black, Membership of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints: 1830-1848, 25:517-18

    Nauvoo Temple Endowment Register, 1845-1846

    Platt, Nauvoo: Early Mormon...Series, 1839-1846

    Smith, Nauvoo Social History Project

    Belvidere, Iowa, RLDS Branch Records

    Note that Seventy Quorum Membership, 1835-1846 is at odds with some of this: it has him born in 1806 in Ireland (no more specific place) and dying in 1873 in Iowa (no more specific place). It does agree that he was baptized in 1836 and notes under "Post-Nauvoo data" that he was "affiliated with RLDS." It also gives "Brown, Sarah" as one of his wives.

    His obituary appears on page 478 of volume 19 (1872) of the Saints' Herald, the magazine of the RLDS. "At his residence at Preparation, Harrison Co., Iowa, April 18, 1872, of old age, Br. EDWARD JOHNSON, in the 87th year of his life. He was an old-time saint, and was faithful to his conceptions of duty to the last. Peaceful be his rest."

    Note that an age of 87 in 1872 is in accord with a birth year of 1785.

    Note also that while the Saints' Herald obituary places the (now-vanished) town of Preparation in Harrison County, Iowa, its site actually was and is in Monona County.

    From the Saints' Herald for 1 Jan 1873 (vol. 20, p. 16), by Joseph Smith III, Prophet-President:

    "The notable departures from this earthly life, so far as the church has been affected thereby, are Bro. William Marks, Sr., Brn. George Bellamy, J. B. Brown, Austin Cowles, N. H. Ditterline, Duty Griffith, Edward Johnson, John Norton, and Alva Smith, all good men. The most of these brethren were old-time Saints, faithful and true. All of them were of very excellent service to the church where they lived. As the New Year comes in we wonder how many that begin it will be left at its close to battle for the right."

    The fact that Edward Johnson died in Preparation naturally makes us wonder if he was one of those who were, for a time, "Baneemyites," followers of Charles B. Thompson:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_B._Thompson
    http://www.iowadnr.gov/Destinations/StateParksRecAreas/IowasStateParks/ParkDetails.aspx?ParkID=610160
    http://www.wellswooster.com/tommies/cbthompson.htm
    http://iagenweb.org/boards/monona/biographies/index.cgi?read=150652

    Edward married Sarah Frances Brown. Sarah was born on 7 Sep 1781 in Armagh, Armagh, Ireland; died on 4 Apr 1844 in Missouri. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 7.  Sarah Frances Brown was born on 7 Sep 1781 in Armagh, Armagh, Ireland; died on 4 Apr 1844 in Missouri.

    Notes:

    The Find a Grave entry for her husband asserts that she died in Canada before the family arrived in Missouri.

    Children:
    1. 3. Margaret Johnson was born on 28 Feb 1821 in London, Middlesex, Ontario; died on 17 Dec 1900 in Driggs, Teton, Idaho.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Isaiah Guymon was born on 27 May 1753 in Rowan County, North Carolina; died on 20 Feb 1809 in Stokes, North Carolina.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Aft Oct 1819, Surry County, North Carolina

    Isaiah married Elizabeth Flynn about 1773 in Surry County, North Carolina. Elizabeth (daughter of Thomas Flynn and Elizabeth) was born about 1753 in Lunenburg, Virginia; died about 1834. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  Elizabeth Flynn was born about 1753 in Lunenburg, Virginia (daughter of Thomas Flynn and Elizabeth); died about 1834.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Abt 1755
    • Alternate death: Bef 1834, Surry County, North Carolina

    Children:
    1. 4. Thomas Guymon was born on 10 Mar 1787 in Surry County, North Carolina; died on 20 Oct 1855 in Springville, Utah, Utah; was buried in Springville City Cemetery, Springville, Utah, Utah.

  3. 10.  John Gordon was born about 1772 in Gordonville, Albemarle, Virginia (son of Thomas Gordon and Sarah Wilson); died in 1839 in Pinnacle, Stokes, North Carolina; was buried in Frye-Tuttle-Westmoreland Cemetery, Germantown, Stokes, North Carolina.

    John married Barzilla Martin. Barzilla (daughter of John Martin and Sarah) was born on 27 Mar 1774 in Albermarle County, Virginia; died on 11 Oct 1830 in Pinnacle, Stokes, North Carolina; was buried in Gordon Cemetery, Stokes, North Carolina. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 11.  Barzilla Martin was born on 27 Mar 1774 in Albermarle County, Virginia (daughter of John Martin and Sarah); died on 11 Oct 1830 in Pinnacle, Stokes, North Carolina; was buried in Gordon Cemetery, Stokes, North Carolina.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: 7 Apr 1774

    Children:
    1. 5. Sarah Gordon was born in 1789 in Stokes, North Carolina; died on 7 Dec 1872 in Fountain Green, Sanpete, Utah; was buried in Springville City Cemetery, Springville, Utah, Utah.

  5. 12.  John Johnson

    Notes:

    Seventy Quorum Membership, 1835–1846, entry on his son Edward, has him as "George (John?) Johnson".

    Children:
    1. 6. Edward Johnson was born on 17 Aug 1785 in Armagh, Armagh, Ireland; died on 18 Apr 1872 in Preparation, Monona, Iowa; was buried in Preparation Cemetery, Monona, Iowa.