Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Mary Carew

Female


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Mary Carew (daughter of Nicholas Carew and Elizabeth Bryan); was buried in St. Botolph's, Aldgate, London, England.

    Notes:

    Arthur Darcy and Mary Carew were both descendants of Edward III and Philippa of Hainault, he as a 6Xgreat-grandson and she as a 5Xgreat-granddaughter. By those descents they were, to one another, sixth cousins once removed. But in fact they were slightly more closely related than that: fifth cousins once removed by shared descent from Ralph de Greystoke and Katherine Clifford, and fifth cousins twice removed by shared descent from John de Welle and Maud de Ros.

    Family/Spouse: Arthur Darcy. Arthur (son of Thomas Darcy and Dowsabel Tempest) was born in in of Brimham, Yorkshire, England; died on 3 Apr 1561; was buried in St. Botolph's, Aldgate, London, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. Henry Darcy was born in in of Brimham, Yorkshire, England.
    2. Thomas Darcy died on 6 Nov 1605.
    3. Edward Darcy was born about 1543 in of Dartford, Kent, England; died on 28 Oct 1612 in Dartford, Kent, England; was buried in St. Botolph's, Aldgate, London, England.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Nicholas Carew was born before 1496 (son of Richard Carew and Malyn Oxenbridge); died on 3 Mar 1540 in Tower Hill, London, England; was buried in St. Botolph's, Aldgate, London, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: of Beddington, Surrey, England

    Notes:

    Nicholas Carew was a courtier and diplomat, knight of the shire for Surrey, sheriff of Surrey and Sussex 1518-19, and Master of the Horse to Henry VIII. A close friend and rousting partner of the king's for many years, he was eventually brought down by Thomas Cromwell. Accused and convicted of having been part of the Exeter Conspiracy, he was attainted and executed at Tower Hill on 3 Mar 1540. One of the jurors who convicted him was his wife's brother Francis Bryan, rake, libertine, trimmer, close friend of Henry VIII, remembered to history, for his efficient lack of any perceptible principle, as the "Vicar of Hell."

    Nicholas married Elizabeth Bryan in Dec 1514. Elizabeth (daughter of Thomas Bryan and Margaret Bourchier) died between 21 May 1546 and 17 Jul 1546; was buried in St. Botolph's, Aldgate, London, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Elizabeth Bryan (daughter of Thomas Bryan and Margaret Bourchier); died between 21 May 1546 and 17 Jul 1546; was buried in St. Botolph's, Aldgate, London, England.

    Notes:

    Elizabeth Bryan was vice-chamberlain to Catherine of Aragon, an office also held by her father, and a reputed mistress of Henry VIII. Following her husband's death, she was reduced to penury. Some of their former property eventually wound up in the Darcy family.

    Children:
    1. 1. Mary Carew was buried in St. Botolph's, Aldgate, London, England.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Richard Carew was born about 1470 in of Beddington, Surrey, England (son of James Carew and Eleanor Hoo); died on 23 May 1520.

    Notes:

    He was made a knight banneret by Henry VII after the battle of Blackheath, 1497.

    Richard married Malyn Oxenbridge. Malyn (daughter of Robert Oxenbridge and Anne Lyvelode) died on 3 Oct 1544. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  Malyn Oxenbridge (daughter of Robert Oxenbridge and Anne Lyvelode); died on 3 Oct 1544.
    Children:
    1. 2. Nicholas Carew was born before 1496; died on 3 Mar 1540 in Tower Hill, London, England; was buried in St. Botolph's, Aldgate, London, England.

  3. 6.  Thomas Bryan was born in in of St. John, Hampshire, England (son of Thomas Bryan and Isabel); died between 1 Oct 1508 and 30 Jan 1518.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 1518

    Notes:

    Thomas Bryan was knight of the body to Henrys VII and VIII, knighted by Henry VII in 1497, and vice-chamberlain to Catherine of Aragon.

    Thomas married Margaret Bourchier before 1495. Margaret (daughter of Humphrey Bourchier and Elizabeth Tilney) died between 20 Aug 1551 and 21 Jun 1552 in Layton, Essex, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 7.  Margaret Bourchier (daughter of Humphrey Bourchier and Elizabeth Tilney); died between 20 Aug 1551 and 21 Jun 1552 in Layton, Essex, England.

    Notes:

    Margaret Bourchier was lady governess to the children of King Henry VIII of England, the future monarchs Mary I, Elizabeth I, and Edward VI, as well as the illegitimate Henry FitzRoy.

    Children:
    1. 3. Elizabeth Bryan died between 21 May 1546 and 17 Jul 1546; was buried in St. Botolph's, Aldgate, London, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  James Carew was born in in of Beddington, Surrey, England (son of Nicholas Carew and Margaret Fiennes); died on 22 Dec 1492.

    James married Eleanor Hoo about 1468. Eleanor (daughter of Thomas Hoo and Eleanor Welles) was born about 1449. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  Eleanor Hoo was born about 1449 (daughter of Thomas Hoo and Eleanor Welles).
    Children:
    1. 4. Richard Carew was born about 1470 in of Beddington, Surrey, England; died on 23 May 1520.

  3. 10.  Robert Oxenbridge was born in in of Forde Place, Brede, Sussex, England (son of Robert Oxenbridge); died on 9 Mar 1487.

    Robert married Anne Lyvelode. Anne died on 27 Feb 1494. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 11.  Anne Lyvelode died on 27 Feb 1494.
    Children:
    1. 5. Malyn Oxenbridge died on 3 Oct 1544.
    2. Goddard Oxenbridge was born in in of Forde Place, Brede, Sussex, England; died on 10 Feb 1531; was buried in Lady Chapel, Brede, Sussex, England.

  5. 12.  Thomas Bryan was born in in St. Andrew's, Holborn, London, England; died on 14 Aug 1500.

    Notes:

    From the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (citation details below):

    Bryan, Sir Thomas (d. 1500), judge, was born in obscure circumstances, though he assumed arms containing three piles in allusion to those of Sir Guy Bryan (d. 1390) whose barony became extinct in 1456. His early career suggests that he was the son of a Londoner, and the most probable lineage is that of John Bryan (d. 1395), citizen and fishmonger, whose son John (d. 1418) owned property in various parts of London, Buckinghamshire, Middlesex, and Essex. Sir Thomas likewise had property in London and Buckinghamshire. […]

    On the accession of Edward IV in 1471 Bryan was appointed chief justice of the common pleas, and in 1475 was created a knight of the Bath. In 1472 he received a remarkable patent of reappointment 'during good behaviour', the usual form of judicial appointment being 'during the king's pleasure'. The plea roll for Hilary term 1477 contains a badly defaced drawing which shows Bryan, in robes, receiving an amended version of this patent from the king. His tenure of the chief justiceship, which lasted for a little over twenty-nine years until his death, was the longest ever, though his lasting influence was staid rather than innovative. He always maintained that the common law should be guided by equity and justice, and he was not unaware of social changes: for instance, he favoured the new-found protection of the copyholder against his lord by an action of trespass. Nevertheless, in a period when the king's bench, under Hussey and Fyneux, was developing new remedies and becoming a rival court for court of common pleas, Bryan's judicial conservatism set the court of common pleas on a course which by the end of the sixteenth century would seem distinctly reactionary.

    Bryan did not favour the current movement to find a means of barring entails. Although the doubts which he expressed in Taltarum's case (1472) failed to prevent the common recovery from becoming established in the early years of his presidency, he was scrupulous to protect the interests of leaseholders and remaindermen. Such considerations seem to have weighed less with his fellow judges, but the legacy of his cautious approach was the elaborate scheme of double and triple vouchers developed in the following century. In Hulcote's case (1493) he stopped counsel from disputing the 'common learning' that a landowner's freedom to dispose of the fee simple could not be restrained by condition, while in the same case approving a condition against barring an entail: this distinction encouraged a spate of 'perpetuity clauses', to counter the common recovery, which were not finally declared ineffective until 1613. Bryan was also opposed to the circumvention of wager of law by means of actions on the case, the issue later to provide the main source of contention between the two benches.

    Thomas married Isabel. Isabel died in 1467. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  6. 13.  Isabel died in 1467.

    Notes:

    Widow of Thomas Blount, treasurer of Calais.

    Children:
    1. 6. Thomas Bryan was born in in of St. John, Hampshire, England; died between 1 Oct 1508 and 30 Jan 1518.

  7. 14.  Humphrey Bourchier was born in in of Massingham Parva, Norfolk, England (son of John Bourchier and Margery Berners); died on 14 Apr 1471 in Barnet, Hertfordshire, England; was buried in Chapel of St. Edmund and St. Thomas the Martyr, Westminster Abbey, London, England.

    Notes:

    Killed fighting on the Yorkist side at the Battle of Barnet.

    Humphrey married Elizabeth Tilney after 11 Apr 1451. Elizabeth (daughter of Frederick Tilney and Elizabeth Cheyne) was born about 1442; died on 4 Apr 1497. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  8. 15.  Elizabeth Tilney was born about 1442 (daughter of Frederick Tilney and Elizabeth Cheyne); died on 4 Apr 1497.
    Children:
    1. 7. Margaret Bourchier died between 20 Aug 1551 and 21 Jun 1552 in Layton, Essex, England.
    2. John Bourchier was born about 1467 in of West Horsley, Surrey, England; died on 16 Mar 1533 in Calais, France; was buried in Calais, France.