Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Nicholas de Audley

Male 1289 - 1316  (27 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Nicholas de Audley was born on 11 Nov 1289 in of Heleigh in Audley, Staffordshire, England (son of Nicholas de Audley and Katherine Giffard); died on 28 Nov 1316.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: 11 Nov 1292, of Heleigh in Audley, Staffordshire, England
    • Alternate death: Bef 9 Dec 1316

    Notes:

    He was summoned to Parliament from 8 Jan 1313 to 25 Aug 1318 (by which latter date he had already died) by writs directed Nicholao de Audele.

    Nicholas married Joan Martin before 6 Jun 1313. Joan (daughter of William Martin and Eleanor fitz Reynold) died between Feb 1320 and 1 Aug 1322. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. Alice de Audley died after 1357.
    2. James de Audley was born on 7 Jan 1314 in Kneesal, Nottinghamshire, England; died on 1 Apr 1386 in Heleigh in Audley, Staffordshire, England; was buried in Hulton Abbey, Staffordshire, England.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Nicholas de Audley was born before 1258 in of Heleigh in Audley, Staffordshire, England (son of James de Aldithley and Ela Longespée); died before 28 Aug 1299.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 28 Aug 1299

    Nicholas married Katherine Giffard. Katherine (daughter of John Giffard and Maud de Clifford) was born about 1272; died after 1321. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Katherine Giffard was born about 1272 (daughter of John Giffard and Maud de Clifford); died after 1321.
    Children:
    1. 1. Nicholas de Audley was born on 11 Nov 1289 in of Heleigh in Audley, Staffordshire, England; died on 28 Nov 1316.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  James de Aldithley was born about 1220 in of Heleigh in Audley, Staffordshire, England (son of Henry of Aldithley and Bertrade de Mainwaring); died about 11 Jun 1272 in Ireland.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 23 Jun 1272, Thomond, Ireland

    Notes:

    Also de Aldithel, Audley. Crusader with Prince Edward, 1270.

    "James of Aldithley, 1st or 2nd s. and h., b. about 1220. Keeper of the castle of Newcastle-under-Lyme, 30 Oct. 1250. He joined in a letter of the Barons to the Pope in 1258. Witnessed, as one of the King's sworn Council, the confirmation by Henry III of the Provisions of Oxford, 1258; Lord Marcher; Sheriff of Salop, and co. Staff., 1261-62 and 1270-71; Justiciar of Ireland 1270-72. He took an active part on the King's side against the Barons, being in arms for the King on the Welsh Marches in 1264, and engaging in the Evesham campaign in 1265. He m., in 1244, Ela, da. of William Longespee (who d. 1250), s. and h. of Ela, suo jure Countess of Salisbury, by Idoine, da. and h. of Richard de Camville. She brought him the manors of Stratton, afterwards called Stratton Audley, and Wretchwick, Oxon, in frank marriage. He d. about 11 June (1272) 56 Hen. III, in Ireland, by 'breaking his neck.' Writ for his Inq. p. m. 16 July 1272. His widow d. apparently shortly before 22 Nov. 1299. Inq. p. m. (1325-26) 19 Edw. II." [Complete Peerage I:337-38, as corrected in Volume XIV.]

    James married Ela Longespée before 12 Jun 1244. Ela (daughter of William Longespée and Idoine de Camville) died before 22 Nov 1299. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  Ela Longespée (daughter of William Longespée and Idoine de Camville); died before 22 Nov 1299.

    Notes:

    Suo jure Countess of Salisbury.

    Children:
    1. 2. Nicholas de Audley was born before 1258 in of Heleigh in Audley, Staffordshire, England; died before 28 Aug 1299.
    2. Hugh de Audley was born about 1267 in of Stratton, Stratton Audley, Oxfordshire, England; died between 1325 and 1326.

  3. 6.  John Giffard was born about 1232 in of Brimpsfield, Cirencester, Gloucestershire, England (son of Elias IV Giffard and Alice Mautravers); died on 28 May 1299; was buried on 11 Jun 1299 in Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 29 May 1299, Boyton, Wiltshire, England

    Notes:

    From Complete Peerage V:639:

    Sir John Giffard, of Brimpsfield, Badgeworth, Stonehouse, Stoke Gifford, and Rockhampton, co. Gloucester, Elston, Orcheston St. George, Sherrington, Ashton, and Broughton Gifford, Wilts, son and heir of Sir Elis Giffard, of Brimpsfield, &c. (who died shortly before 2 May 1248) (c1), by his 2nd wife, Alice, sister of Sir John Mautravers, of Lytchet Matravers, Dorset (a). He was aged 16, or 16 and more, at his father's death (b1). With several other barons, he seized the Bishop of Hereford, 11 June 1263, and took him to Eardisley Castle. On 18 August following, he was among those who made a treaty with Edward, the King's son. He had just been appointed, 7 August, by the advice of the Magnates of the Council, Keeper of the castle of St. Briavel and the forest of Dean, during pleasure, and he was pardoned, 18 September following, for all trespasses committed by reason of non-observance of the Provisions of Oxford. He was appointed joint Keeper of the counties of Gloucester, Worcester, and Hereford, 24 December 1263. In 1264 he belonged to the baronial party, and in April, being in command at Kenilworth, he surprised and destroyed Warwick Castle, taking the Earl and Countess prisoners. On 14 May following he was at the battle of Lewes, where he was taken prisoner early in the day, but he had already captured William la Zuche. He was one of those prohibited, 16 February 1264/5, from taking part in the tournament at Dunstaple, and ordered to attend a Council on the morrow of Ash Wednesday [19 February] following. He changed sides together with the Earl of Gloucester and others, and was in the King's army at the battle of Evesham, 4 August 1265. In consideration of his services at this battle, he was pardoned, 9 Oct. 1265, for having adhered to Simon de Montfort at the battle of Lewes, and for all other trespasses committed up to the said 9 October. He was one of the commissioners empowered, 24 April 1274, to make a truce at the ford of Montgomery, in a month from Easter [29 April], between Llewelyn ab Gruffyd, Prince of Wales, and Humphrey de Bohun of Brecknock. On 6 November 1281 he had licence to hunt wolves, with his own hounds, throughout all the King's forests in England. He was appointed Keeper of the castle of Llandovery, co. Carmarthen, 9 April 1282, and of that of Builth, co. Brecknock, 14 October following, both during pleasure. On 18 November 1283 the King granted him, in fee, the commote of Iscennen, co. Carmarthen, to hold by the service of a knight's fee: and, on 8 February 1289/90, the castle of Dynevor in that county, for life, as a refuge for himself and his men: he was ordered to deliver this castle to Walter de Pederton, 29 July 1297. He was present at the assemblies held at Berwick in October and November 1297, to discuss the various claims to the Crown of Scotland. He was Captain of Podensac in Gascony, which town he surrendered to the French, in 1294/5. He was summoned for Military Service from 18 July 1257 to 7 May 1299, to attend the King at Shrewsbury, 28 June 1283, to attend the King at Salisbury, 26 January 1296/7, to a Military Council, 20 August 1297,and to Parliament from 24 June 1295. to 10 April 1299, by writs directed Johanni Giffard, or Gyffard, occasionally with the additionde Brimmesfeld', whereby he is held to have become Lord Giffard.

    He was affianced, at the age of 4 years, to Aubrey de Caumville (who was about the same age), but he did not marry her (b2). He married, 1stly, Maud [c2], widow of Sir William Lungespee, of Amesbury, Aldbourne, and Trowbridge, Wilts, Canford, Dorset, Bicester, Oxon; Brattleby, co., Lincoln, &c. (who died between 23 December 1256 and 3 January 1256/7], and daughter and heir of Sir Walter de Clifford, of Clifford co. Hereford, Cortham, Salop, &c., by Margaret, daughter of Llewelyn ab Iorwerth, Prince of North Wales. She, who was living 1 December 1281, died s.p.m., not long afterwards. He married, 2ndly, in 1286, Margaret, widow of Sir John de Neville, of Hallingbury, Wethersfield, Great Totham, Great Wakering and Langharn, Essex, Alphington, Devon, &c. who died shortly before 20 May 1282. He died at Boyton, Wilts, 29 May, and was buried 11 June 1299 in Malmesbury Abbey. His widow's dower was ordered to be assigned, 1 August 1299, and on 5 August she was assigned the manors of Stonehouse, Stoke Gifford, Elston, and Broughton Gifford. She died shortly before 13 December 1338.

    (c1) In 1221 this Elis stated that "Osbertus Giffard, antecessor suusqui venit ad conquestum Angl' tenuit manerium de Bimesfeld' . . . et post eum Elias flius suus . . . et post eum Elias filius illius Elieet pater suus." At least one generation is here omitted. The Elis living in 1221 was son and heir of Elis III, by Maud, daughter of Morice fitz Robert fitz Hardinge, of Berkeley: which Elis III owed 100 marks 'pro fine terre sue' in 1166 and died before Michaelmas 1190, when William le Mareschal owed 140 marks for the custody of the lands of Elis Giffard. Elis III was son and heir of Elis II (who became a monk in Gloucester Abbey), by Berta (living 1167), sister of Walter de Clifford, of Clifford and Glasbury, and daughter of Richard fitzPonce. In 1130 Elis II rendered account of 100 marks of silver for the relief of his father's lands, being son and heir of Elis I, by Ala, his wife. Before 1096 Elis I had succeeded his father Osbern Giffard, the Domesday tenant of Brimpsfield, Stoke, Rockhampton, Elston, Orcheston, etc.

    (a) John Mautravers gave the manor of Ashton and the advowson of the church of St. Peter at Codford, Wilts, to Elis Giffard in free marriage with Alice his sister, to hold to them and their heirs of their bodies, by the service of a knight's fee.

    (b1) "Elias Giffard". He held the manor of Winterburne (now Elston), of the King in chief, as the head of his barony; the manor of Sherrington pertaining to that barony; and that of Ashton, held ofJ ohn Mautravers in free marriage. Heir [name cut away] his son aged 16 [rest cut away]. The proof of age of this heir, John Giffard, is undated and defective, but it states that he was born on the day of St. Wulstan (19 Jan).

    (b2) So the proof of age mentioned above. She was probably the Aubrey de Canville, a nun of Polesworth, who was elected Abbess in Dec 1276 or in the following month. The marriage was contracted at Arrow, co. Warwick, and she must have been a daughter of Thomas de Camville, of Arrow, and a descendant of Aubrey Marmion, Lady of Arrow, wife of William de Caumville.

    John married Maud de Clifford before 10 Mar 1271. Maud (daughter of Walter IV de Clifford and Margaret ferch Llewelyn) was born in in of Clifford, Herefordshire, England; died between 1282 and 1285. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 7.  Maud de Clifford was born in in of Clifford, Herefordshire, England (daughter of Walter IV de Clifford and Margaret ferch Llewelyn); died between 1282 and 1285.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Aft 1 Dec 1281
    • Alternate death: 1282

    Notes:

    "He [John Giffard] married, 1stly, Maud, widow of Sir William Lungespee, of Amesbury, Aldbourne, and Trowbridge, Wilts, Canford, Dorset, Bicester, Oxon; Brattleby, co., Lincoln, &c. (who died between 23 December 1256 and 3 January 1256/7), and daughter and heir of Sir Walter de Clifford, of Clifford co. Hereford, Cortham, Salop, &c., by Margaret, daughter of Llewelyn ab Iorwerth, Prince of North Wales. She, who was living 1 December 1281, died s.p.m., not long afterwards." [Complete Peerage V:639-44]

    [footnote in CP to the above:] Maud Lungespee notified the King that John Giffard had abducted her from her manor of Canford, Dorset, and taken her against her will to his castle of Brimpsfield, and there detained her. John appeared before the King, and professed himself ready to prove that he did not abduct her against her will, and offered a fine of 300 marks for the marriage already contracted, as it was said, between them, provided she made no further complaint against him. On 10 March 1270/1 the King ordained that if she were not content, the said fine should be void,and John should stand his trial at a month from Easter. And as she was too unwell to appear before the King, commissioners were sent to inquire into the truth of the matter, and to certify the King thereof. John and Maud, and her Ist husband, William Lungespee, were all descended from Richard fitz Ponce. Why John Giffard should have referred to himself as being of the race of Le Lungespee as in the proof of age mentioned above he is said to have done--is not explicable; unless, indeed, the sobriquet was derived from the family of Clifford.

    Children:
    1. 3. Katherine Giffard was born about 1272; died after 1321.
    2. Eleanor Giffard was born in 1275 in of Brimpsfield, Cirencester, Gloucestershire, England; died before 23 Jan 1324.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Henry of Aldithley was born about 1175 in of Heleigh in Audley, Staffordshire, England (son of Adam of Aldithley and Emma fitz Ralph); died before Nov 1246.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Bef 19 Nov 1246

    Notes:

    Also called Henry de Audley; Aldithlegh.

    Sheriff of Shrophsire and Staffordshire 1227-8, 1229-32.

    "Henry of Aldithley, 2nd son of Adam of Aldithley, (who d. bet. 1203 and 1211) by Emma, daughter of Ralf fitz Orm, of Darlaston, Staffs; was b. about 1175; with his father, he was witness to a charter of Harvey Bagot in 1194. He bought large estates from Eleanor Malbank in 1214; in 1227 he acquired the manors of Edgmund and Newport, and in 1230 that of Ford, all in Salop, and all held by him direct from the Crown, though not by military or knight service. He was Under Sheriff of Salop and co. Stafford 1217-20, and Sheriff 1227-32; was in command of the Welsh Marches 1223-46. He built the castle of Heligh, co. Stafford; and Red Castle, Salop. In 1223 he founded Hulton Abbey. He was appointed Custodian of Chester and Beeston Castle, 22 June 1237, on the extinction of the the earldom of Chester. He m. in 1217, Bertred, daughter of Ralf Mainwaring, Seneschal of Chester. He d. in 1246, shortly bef. Nov. His widow was living in 1249. She was bur. in Hulton Abbey." [Complete Peerage I:337, as corrected in Volume XIV.]

    From A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire:

    "That this family of Alditheley, vulgarly called Audley," says Dugdale, "came to be great and eminent, the ensuing discourse will sufficiently manifest: but that the rise thereof was no higher than King John's time, and that the first who assumed this surname was a branch of that ancient and noble family of Verdon, whose chief seat was at Alton Castle in the northern part of Staffordshire, I am very inclined to believe; partly by reason that Henry had the inheritance of Alditheley given him by Nicholas de Verdon, who d. in the 16th Henry III [1232], or near that time; and partly for that he bore for his arms the same ordinary as Vernon did...so that probably the ancestor of this Henry first seated himself at Alditheley: for that there hath been an ancient mansion there, the large moat, northwards from the parish church there (somewhat less than a furlong, and upon the chief part of a fair ascent), do sufficiently manifest."

    Henry de Alditheley, to whom Dugdale alludes above, being in great favour with Ranulph, Earl of Chester and Lincoln (the most powerful subject of England in his time), obtained from that nobleman a grant of Newhall in Cheshire with manors in Staffordshire and other parts--and for his adhesion to King John, in that monarch's struggle with the insurrectionary barons, a royal grant of the lordship o fStorton in Warwickshire, part of the possessions of Roger de Summerville. In the first four years of King Henry III [1216-1220], he executed the office of sheriff for the counties of Salop and Stafford as deputy for his patron, the great Earl Ranulph. In the 10th of Henry III [1226], this Henry de Alditheley was appointed governor of the castles of Carmarthen and Cardigan and made sheriff the next year of the counties of Salop and Stafford and constable of the castles of Salop and Bridgenorth, which sheriffalty he held for five years. Upon his retirement from office, he had a confirmation of all such lands whereof he was then possessed as well those granted to him by Ranulph, Earl of Chester, and Nicholas de Verdon, as those in Ireland given him by Hugh de Lacy, Earl of Ulster, whose constable he was in that province. He subsequently obtained divers other territorial grants from the crown, but, notwithstanding, when Richard Mareschall, Earl of Pembroke, rebelled and made an incursion into Wales, the king, Henry III, thought it prudent to secure the persons of this Henry and all the other barons-marchers. He was afterwards, however, constituted governor of Shrewsbury in place of John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, and, on the death of John, Earl of Chester, governor of the castle of Chester, and also that of Beeston, then called the "Castle on the Rock," and soon after made governor of Newcastle-under-Lyne. This powerful feudal baron m. Bertred, dau. of Ralph de Meisnil-warin, of Cheshire, and had a son, James, and a dau., Emme, who m. Griffith ap Madoc, Lord of Bromefield, a person of great power in Wales. He d. in 1236, having founded and endowed the Abbey of Hilton near to his castle at Heleigh, in Staffordshire, for Cistercian monks, and was s. by his son, James de Alditheley.

    Henry married Bertrade de Mainwaring in 1217. Bertrade (daughter of Ralph Mainwaring and Amicia de Meschines) died after 1248; was buried in Hulton Abbey, Staffordshire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  Bertrade de Mainwaring (daughter of Ralph Mainwaring and Amicia de Meschines); died after 1248; was buried in Hulton Abbey, Staffordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 1249
    • Alternate death: Aft 3 Nov 1249

    Children:
    1. Alice de Audley died after Aug 1265.
    2. Amicia de Audley
    3. Emma de Audley was born about 1218 in of Heleigh in Audley, Staffordshire, England; died after 22 Dec 1270.
    4. 4. James de Aldithley was born about 1220 in of Heleigh in Audley, Staffordshire, England; died about 11 Jun 1272 in Ireland.

  3. 10.  William Longespée was born before 12 May 1205 (son of William I Longespée and Ela of Salisbury); died on 7 Feb 1249 in Mansourah, Egypt.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Abt 1208, of Amesbury, Wiltshire, England
    • Alternate birth: Abt 1212
    • Alternate death: 7 Feb 1250, Mansourah, Egypt
    • Alternate death: 8 Feb 1250, Mansourah, Egypt

    Notes:

    Killed on crusade, at the Battle of Mansourah.

    William married Idoine de Camville after Apr 1216. Idoine (daughter of Richard de Camville and Eustache Basset) was born before 1206; died between 1 Jan 1251 and 21 Sep 1251. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 11.  Idoine de Camville was born before 1206 (daughter of Richard de Camville and Eustache Basset); died between 1 Jan 1251 and 21 Sep 1251.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Bef 21 Sep 1252

    Children:
    1. 5. Ela Longespée died before 22 Nov 1299.
    2. William Longespée was born in in of Amesbury, Wiltshire, England; died between 23 Dec 1256 and 3 Jan 1257.

  5. 12.  Elias IV Giffard was born about 1170 in of Brimpsfield, Cirencester, Gloucestershire, England (son of Elias III Giffard and (Unknown wife of Elias III Giffard)); died before 2 May 1248.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 1249

    Notes:

    "Ivor West stated, in June 2002, that Elis IV and his sister Bertha were the children of Elis III by an unknown wife, not by Maud." [Chris Phillips, Some Corrections and Additions to the Complete Peerage.]

    From Complete Peerage V:639:

    Sir John Giffard, of Brimpsfield, Badgeworth, Stonehouse, Stoke Gifford, and Rockhampton, co. Gloucester, Elston, Orcheston St. George, Sherrington, Ashton, and Broughton Gifford, Wilts, son and heir of Sir Elis Giffard, of Brimpsfield, &c. (who died shortly before 2 May 1248) (c), by his 2nd wife, Alice, sister of Sir John Mautravers, of Lytchet Matravers, Dorset.

    (c) In 1221 this Elis stated that "Osbertus Giffard, antecessor suusqui venit ad conquestum Angl' tenuit manerium de Bimesfeld' . . . et post eum Elias flius suus . . . et post eum Elias filius illius Elieet pater suus." At least one generation is here omitted. The Elis living in 1221 was son and heir of Elis III, by Maud, daughter of Morice fitz Robert fitz Hardinge, of Berkeley: which Elis III owed 100 marks 'pro fine terre sue' in 1166 and died before Michaelmas 1190, when William le Mareschal owed 140 marks for the custody of the lands of Elis Giffard. Elis III was son and heir of Elis II (who became a monk in Gloucester Abbey), by Berta (living 1167), sister of Walter de Clifford, of Clifford and Glasbury, and daughter of Richard fitz Ponce. In 1130 Elis II rendered account of 100 marks of silver for the relief of his father's lands, being son and heir of Elis I, by Ala, his wife. Before 1096 Elis I had succeeded his father Osbern Giffard, the Domesday tenant of Brimpsfield, Stoke, Rockhampton, Elston, Orcheston, etc.

    Elias married Alice Mautravers. Alice (daughter of John Mautravers and Hawise) was born in in of Lytchett Mautravers, Dorset, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  6. 13.  Alice Mautravers was born in in of Lytchett Mautravers, Dorset, England (daughter of John Mautravers and Hawise).

    Notes:

    From Complete Peerage V:640:

    Sir John Giffard, of Brimpsfield, Badgeworth, Stonehouse, Stoke Gifford, and Rockhampton, co. Gloucester, Elston, Orcheston St. George, Sherrington, Ashton, and Broughton Gifford, Wilts, son and heir of Sir Elis Giffard, of Brimpsfield, &c. (who died shortly before 2 May 1248), by his 2nd wife, Alice, sister of Sir John Mautravers, of Lytchet Matravers, Dorset (a).

    (a) John Mautravers gave the manor of Ashton and the advowson of the church of St. Peter at Codford, Wilts, to Elis Giffard in free marriage with Alice his sister, to hold to them and their heirs of their bodies, by the service of a knight's fee.

    Children:
    1. 6. John Giffard was born about 1232 in of Brimpsfield, Cirencester, Gloucestershire, England; died on 28 May 1299; was buried on 11 Jun 1299 in Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England.

  7. 14.  Walter IV de Clifford was born in in of Clifford, Herefordshire, England (son of Walter III de Clifford); died before 23 Dec 1263.

    Notes:

    Sheriff of Herefordshire 1215-16. Constable of Carmarthen and Cardigan castles in 1228. Fought in Ireland, 1210, and in Wales, 1257, 1258, 1260, and 1263.

    Called Walter III de Clifford by many of the sources cited here, but Peter Stewart (citation details below) says that this represents a conflation of III and IV, and that it was IV whose second wife was Margred ferch Llywellyn of Wales who was the mother of his heiress.

    Walter married Margaret ferch Llewelyn before 2 Nov 1234. Margaret (daughter of Llywelyn Fawr ap Iorwerth and (One of the several mistresses of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth)) died in 1265. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  8. 15.  Margaret ferch Llewelyn (daughter of Llywelyn Fawr ap Iorwerth and (One of the several mistresses of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth)); died in 1265.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Aft 1268

    Notes:

    Also known as Marared; Margred; Margaret of Wales; Margaret of North Wales.

    Notes on the parentage of Gwladus and Margaret, daughters of Llwelyn ap Fawr:

    Complete Peerage (IX: 276) and Royal Ancestry both give Gwladus as a daughter of Joan of England. Royal Ancestry gives Margaret as an illegitimate daughter of Llywelyn.

    The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography says that Joan was "probably" the mother of Gwladus and Margaret.

    In The American Genealogist 41:99 (1965), Walter Lee Sheppard notes that "DNB's account gives Joan only the son David with Helen as probable. Lloyd's History of Wales [...] includes a chart so drawn as to make the maternity of the daughters questionable, and omits Angharad altogether. Prof. Thomas Jones Pierce in his article on Joan in the Dictionary of Welsh Biography names David, but does not mention the daughters at all; but then his cited sources are ony DNB and Lloyd's History of Wales in earlier editions. The correspondence of the writer with Sir Anthony Richard Wagner, Garter Principal King of Arms, however, indicates that all these daughters, with the exception of Gwladys, have been accepted by Major Francis Jones, best known authority on Welsh pedigrees, and based on British Museum Manuscript Add. 15041, on folio 12a, which shows Joan to be mother of David, Gwenlian, Angharad, and Margaret. It is interesting to note that [Complete Peerage] 9:276, under Mortimer of Wigmore, identifies Gwaldys as Joan's daughter."

    Later in the same publication, TAG 41:22, Sheppard provides an addendum, first quoting a letter from E. D. Jones, Librarian of the National Library of Wales: "Robert Vaughan of Hengwrt, a reliable seventeenth century authority, makes Gwladys full sister to Gruffydd, therefore the daughter of Tangwystl. He makes Gwenllian, Angharad and Marred (Margaret) to be daughters of Joan. I am inclined to accept the view that Gwladys Ddu was the daughter of Tangwystl, but in the absence of contemporary records it is not wise to be too dogmatic." Sheppard then continues: "Sir Anthony Richard Wagner KCVO, Garter Principal King of Arms, in a letter to the writer dated 24 Sept. 1964, states that he would accept Margaret as Joan's daughter and, presumably, the other daughters, except Gwladys. He refers to Major Francis Jones and the previously cited British Museum Additional MS, which shows Joan to be mother of David, and points out that the chronology also fits."

    Peter C. Bartrum's Welsh Genealogies (1974-83, searchable here; use the search term "Gruffudd ap Cynan 04"), gives Tangwystl as the mother of Gwladus and Joan as the probable mother of Margaret.

    William Addams Reitwiesner's "The Children of Joan, Princess of North Wales," in The Genealogist 1:80, Spring 1980, argues that we have no certain basis for regarding Joan as the mother of any of Llywelyn's daughters.

    On 9 April 1999, Douglas Richardson posted the following to SGM: "As for the Welsh tradition that any son, legitimate or otherwise, could make a claim to succeed Llywelyn, you may recall that Llywelyn and his son, David, went out of their way to have David recognized as Llywelyn's sole heir, to the exclusion of Llywelyn's illegitimate sons. To accomplish this, they had Llywelyn's wife, Joan, legitimized. The legitimization of Joan was no small feat seeing she was surely born out of wedlock to King John's mistress. Also, they sent David to England to be recognized as Llywelyn's sole heir by the English overlord, David's own uncle, King Henry III. Interestingly, the records of this trip show that David was accompanied by none other than his sister, Gladys. Due to the nature of this trip, it seems odd that Gladys would accompany David on this trip, UNLESS she too was a legitimate child of Llywelyn and Joan. These two pieces of evidence convince me that Gladys was legitimate."

    Children:
    1. 7. Maud de Clifford was born in in of Clifford, Herefordshire, England; died between 1282 and 1285.