Nielsen Hayden genealogy

John de Ferrers

Male 1271 - Abt 1312  (41 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  John de Ferrers was born on 20 Jun 1271 in Cardiff, Glamorgan, Wales (son of Robert de Ferrers and Eleanor de Bohun); died about 27 Aug 1312 in Gascony, France.

    Notes:

    Summoned to Parliament from 6 Feb 1299 to 19 Dec 1311.

    John married Hawise de Muscegros between 2 Feb 1298 and 13 Sep 1300. Hawise (daughter of Robert de Muscegros and (Unknown first wife of Robert de Muscegros)) was born on 21 Dec 1276; died between 23 Jun 1340 and 22 Dec 1350. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. Eleanor de Ferrers died after 1360.
    2. Robert de Ferrers was born on 25 Mar 1309 in of Chartley, Staffordshire, England; died on 28 Aug 1350.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Robert de Ferrers was born about 1239 (son of William de Ferrers and Margaret de Quincy); died about 1279; was buried in St. Thomas Priory, Staffordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Bef 27 Apr 1279
    • Alternate death: Bef 20 Nov 1279

    Notes:

    Earl of Derby. "He joined the Barons opposing Henry III. On 19 Feb 1263, he captured Worcester, pillaged the city and destroyed the Jewish population. He was captured and imprisoned in the Tower of London from Jan 1265 to the spring of 1266. When released, he gathered an army, but was defeated at Chesterfield, 15 May 1266, and again imprisoned, in Wallingford Castle, where he remained until about June 1269. Having lost nearly all of his estates and suffering from gout, he retired from public life." [The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, citation details below.]

    Robert married Eleanor de Bohun on 26 Jun 1269. Eleanor (daughter of Humphrey de Bohun and Eleanor de Briouze) died on 20 Feb 1314; was buried in Walden Abbey, Essex, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Eleanor de Bohun (daughter of Humphrey de Bohun and Eleanor de Briouze); died on 20 Feb 1314; was buried in Walden Abbey, Essex, England.
    Children:
    1. Eleanor de Ferrers
    2. 1. John de Ferrers was born on 20 Jun 1271 in Cardiff, Glamorgan, Wales; died about 27 Aug 1312 in Gascony, France.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  William de Ferrers was born about 1193 in of Tutbury, Burton-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England (son of William de Ferrers and Agnes of Chester); died on 24 Mar 1254 in Evington, Leicestershire, England; was buried on 31 Mar 1254 in Merevale Abbey, Warwickshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 28 Mar 1254, Evington, Leicestershire, England

    Notes:

    Earl of Derby. Constable of Bolsover Castle.

    Died of injuries sustained when he was thrown from a chariot crossing a bridge at St. Neots in Cambridgeshire.

    -----

    So to start with, Sir William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby, born 1193, helpfully had two daughters named Agnes de Ferrers.

    The first Agnes de Ferrers, by Sir William's first wife Sybil Marshal, was born about 1222 and married William de Vescy (b. bef. 16 May 1205).

    The second Agnes de Ferrers, by Sir William's second wife Margaret de Quincy, was born about 1252 and married Sir Robert de Muscegros (b. abt. 1252).

    But that's not all!

    Sir William also had two daughters named Joan de Ferrers.

    Again (you're starting to get the idea by now), the first Joan de Ferrers, by Sir William's first wife Sybil Marshal, was born about 1233 and married, first Sir John de Mohun (b. abt. 1227, d. bef. 1254), and second, Sir Robert de Aguillon (b. 15 Feb 1235/36).

    The second Joan de Ferrers, by Sir William's second wife Margaret de Quincy, was born in 1245 and married Thomas de Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley (b. 1245).

    This second pair of Joans is made even more hilarious by the existence of yet a third Joan de Ferrers, contemporary to the other two, born abt. 1256 to a completely different William de Ferrers, the one born c. 1225, of Bere Ferrers, Tavistock, Devon.

    I'm sure they all got together regularly to laugh about how aggravating this would be to people seven hundred years in the future.

    -----

    As a final piece of genealogical curiosa, Eleanor de Ferrers, youngest daughter of William de Ferrers by his first wife, married Roger de Quincy, father of William de Ferrers' second wife Roger de Quincy, thus rendering Eleanor de Ferrers and Margaret de Quincy one another's stepmothers.

    William married Margaret de Quincy before 1239. Margaret (daughter of Roger de Quincy and Helen of Galloway) was born before 1223; died before 12 Mar 1281. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  Margaret de Quincy was born before 1223 (daughter of Roger de Quincy and Helen of Galloway); died before 12 Mar 1281.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 1294

    Children:
    1. Joan de Ferrers died on 19 Mar 1310; was buried in Abbey Church of St. Augustine, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England.
    2. 2. Robert de Ferrers was born about 1239; died about 1279; was buried in St. Thomas Priory, Staffordshire, England.
    3. William de Ferrers was born about 1240 in of Groby, Leicestershire, England; died before 20 Dec 1287.

  3. 6.  Humphrey de Bohun was born in in of Havering, Essex, England (son of Humphrey de Bohun and Maud of Eu); died on 27 Oct 1265 in Beeston Castle, Cheshire, England; was buried in Combermere Abbey, Cheshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: of Kimbolton, Essex, England

    Notes:

    "He supported Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester, in his failed rebellion against the King, was one of the chief leaders of the rebel party at the battle of Lewes, 14 May 1264, and was taken prisoner at the battle of Evesham (2nd Barons' War), 4 Aug 1265. Sent to Beeston Castle, he died there in captivity." [The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, citation details below.]

    "Humphrey de Bohun, s. and h., had a grant in 1254 as eldest s. of Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford and Essex, of 80 marks a year at the Exchequer till the King could provide for him in lands of that yearly value. In 1257 he was among those who assisted his father to keep the marches between Montgomery and the land of the Earl of Gloucester, and in 1263 was ordered to join his father at Hereford to defend the lands and fortify the castles on the marches against Llywellyn. He joined the Barons against the King, and on 23 July 1264.had the custody of the Castle of Winchester, which he was ordered to surrender 3 June 1265. He had also (15 Sep. 1264) the Island and Castle of Lundy, and (17 Nov. 1264) the manor of Havering, Essex. He fought at the Battle of Evesham, 4. Aug. 1265, where he was taken prisoner." {Complete Peerage 6:462]

    Humphrey married Eleanor de Briouze. Eleanor (daughter of William de Briouze and Eve Marshal) died before 25 Jun 1252; was buried in Llanthony Priory, outside Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 7.  Eleanor de Briouze (daughter of William de Briouze and Eve Marshal); died before 25 Jun 1252; was buried in Llanthony Priory, outside Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Bef 1264

    Children:
    1. 3. Eleanor de Bohun died on 20 Feb 1314; was buried in Walden Abbey, Essex, England.
    2. Humphrey de Bohun was born about Sep 1248; died on 31 Dec 1298 in Pleshey, Essex, England; was buried in Walden Abbey, Essex, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  William de Ferrers (son of William de Ferrers); died on 22 Sep 1247.

    Notes:

    "Sheriff of Notts and Derby, for 7 weeks, February-March 1194. About that time, before the King's return to England, he supported the justiciar against John, Count of Mortain, and, with the Earl of Chester, besieged Nottingham Castle. Shortly afterwards he took part at Richard's second Coronation, 17 April, being one of the four Earls who bore the canopy. After the King's death, he was at the Council of Northampton, which declared for John as Richard's successor: he was present at the Coronation, 27 May 1199. On 7 June 1199, the King restored and confirmed to him the third penny of all the pleas pleaded per vicecomitem de Dereby, unde ipse Comes est, as amply as any of his predecessors had had the same, to hold, to him and his heirs for ever, and with his own hand girded him with the sword as an Earl. On the same day the King gave him Higham with the hundred and a half, and the park of that town, and Newbottle and Blisworth, as his right and inheritance which descended to him as right heir of the land which was of William Peverel, to hold, to him and his heirs for ever, by the service of a knlght's fee. And the Earl quit-claimed the residue of the land which was of William Peverel to the King, and paid 2,000 marks for his charter. He was present at the Coronation of Henry III, 28 October 1216. On 30 October the King granted him the castles of Peak and Bolsover, co. Derby, with the homages, and on 16 January 1216/7 the manor of Melbourne in that co., to hold till the King was 14 years of age. He assisted the Regent to raise the siege of Lincoln Castle, 20 May 1217, and with his brother-in-law, the Earl of Chester, commanded the royal forces which took and razed the castle of Montsorel. In June 1218 he went on Crusade. He was warned, 26 June 1222, to surrender the castles of Peak and Bolsover before Michaelmas. Sheriff of co. Lancaster and Keeper of the honour of Lancaster, 30 December 1223 to 2 January 1227/8. He accompanied the King in the expedition to Brittany and Poitou, April to October 1230. On 19 January 1230/1 he was given the custody of all the lands of the Normans in England which were of his fee. He was at the Council of London, February 1231/2. He was summoned for Military Service against the Scots 15 May 1244, by writ directed W. de Ferar' comiti Derebi." [Complete Peerage]

    Died of the complications of gout.

    William married Agnes of Chester in 1192. Agnes (daughter of Hugh of Chester and Bertrade de Montfort) died on 2 Nov 1247. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  Agnes of Chester (daughter of Hugh of Chester and Bertrade de Montfort); died on 2 Nov 1247.

    Notes:

    According to CP XIV, she may actually have been called Alice. The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz calls her "Agnes (?Alice) de Blundeville".

    Children:
    1. Bertha de Ferrers died after 10 Feb 1267; was buried in Grey Friars, Dunwich, Suffolk, England.
    2. Sybil de Ferrers
    3. 4. William de Ferrers was born about 1193 in of Tutbury, Burton-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England; died on 24 Mar 1254 in Evington, Leicestershire, England; was buried on 31 Mar 1254 in Merevale Abbey, Warwickshire, England.

  3. 10.  Roger de Quincy was born about 1195 (son of Saher de Quincy and Margaret of Leicester); died on 25 Apr 1264.

    Other Events:

    • Baptised: Brackley, Northamptonshire, England

    Notes:

    Earl of Winchester. In right of his first wife, hereditary Constable of Scotland. "At his death he was probably the greatest Anglo-Scottish landowner of his day" [Oxford Dictionary of National Biography].

    From the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography:

    "Little is known of Roger de Quincy before 1219. He was probably the son whom Saer delivered to King John in 1213 as a Scottish hostage for the security of the Anglo-Scottish treaty of 1212. He emerged onto the political stage in 1215 when, along with Saer and the leaders of the baronial rebellion against John, he was excommunicated by Innocent III (r. 1198–1216), but did not figure prominently in the civil war that followed the king's death. [...]

    "Roger de Quincy did not hold the prominence in politics that his father had commanded in England [...] but his wealth secured him an important role. In 1239 and 1246 he joined in written remonstrances from the English nobility to Gregory IX (r. 1227–41) and Innocent IV (r. 1243–54) concerning papal interference in English affairs. Association with the stirrings of dissatisfaction with the government of Henry III expressed in the parliaments of 1248 and 1254 led to identification with the baronial opposition in 1258. At the Oxford parliament Quincy was elected by the barons to the twelve-member commission charged with attendance at the three annual parliaments provided for under the provisions of Oxford, and was appointed also to the committee that arranged the financial aid promised to Henry. In 1259 he led a delegation to St Omer to intercept Richard, earl of Cornwall (d. 1272), and forbid him to return to England until he had sworn to observe the provisions of Oxford. This appears to have been Roger de Quincy's last major act, for he played little part in subsequent events which culminated in open conflict between the king and his baronial opponents, and died on 25 April 1264, eighteen days after Henry had precipitated the country into civil war."

    Roger married Helen of Galloway. Helen (daughter of Alan fitz Roland and (Unknown daughter of Roger de Lacy)) died after 21 Nov 1245; was buried in Brackley, Northamptonshire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 11.  Helen of Galloway (daughter of Alan fitz Roland and (Unknown daughter of Roger de Lacy)); died after 21 Nov 1245; was buried in Brackley, Northamptonshire, England.

    Notes:

    Also called Ellen.

    Alan Fitz Roland, often called Alan of Galloway, married three times. His first wife was a daughter of Roger of Chester, who is often called Roger de Lacy. His second wife was Margaret of Scotland, daughter of David, Earl of Huntington. His third wife was a daughter of Hugh de Lacy, 1st Earl of Ulster.

    The presence of two marriages to daughters of men called de Lacy, both of which daughters' names have been lost, has created understandable confusion. Many online sources show Alan Fitz Roland's daughter Ellen as a daughter of his third marriage. In fact she was a daughter of his first; her maternal grandfather was Roger of Chester, also called Roger de Lacy -- not Hugh de Lacy. To the best of our knowledge, Alan Fitz Roland's third marriage was without issue.

    Children:
    1. Elizabeth de Quincy died before 4 May 1303.
    2. Ellen de Quincy was born about 1222 in Winchester, Hampshire, England; died before 20 Aug 1296.
    3. 5. Margaret de Quincy was born before 1223; died before 12 Mar 1281.

  5. 12.  Humphrey de Bohun was born after 28 Apr 1199 (son of Henry de Bohun and Maud de Mandeville); died on 24 Sep 1275; was buried in Llanthony Priory, outside Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Abt 1200

    Notes:

    Earl of Hereford and, from 27 Aug 1236, Earl of Essex.

    Hereditary Constable of England; Constable of the Exchequer 1228; Constable of Dover Castle and Warden of the Cinque Ports 1239-41; Sheriff of Kent 1239-41; Warden of the Marches of Wales 1245; a crusader in 1250; Privy Councillor 1258; Justice of Assize at Cardiff 1261; Chief Captain of the Army in Wales 1263; Constable of Haye, Huntingdon, and Tregruk Castles.

    "After his father's death William Brewer had custody of Caldicot [Monmouth] and of Walton in Surrey, but Humphrey had livery of Caldicot Castle and all lands held in chief the next year, the King having taken his homage. He joined the Earl of Cornwall in his quarrel with the King in 1227. In 1228/9 he had an acquittance for 15 1/5 fees of the moiety of the fees of Trowbridge. At the coronation of Queen Eleanor in 1236 he was Marshal of the Household. He had livery of his mother's lands 9 Sep. 1236. In 1237 he went on a pilgrimage to Santiago. He was appointed constable of Dover Castle 27 Feb. 1238/9, which he surrendered 4 Nov. 1241, and during these years was sheriff of Kent. He stood sponsor at the baptism of Edward I in 1239. In 1242 he was in the expedition to France, but returned because of the King's foreign favourites. In 1244 the cause of the Welsh rising is assigned to his having kept in his hand the inheritance of the wife of David, s. of Llewelyn, Prince of Wales. He joined in the remonstrance to the Pope in 1246, and was present at the Great Council of 1248. In 1250 he was among those who took the Cross. On 13 Sep. 1251 he had licence to make his will. He was present at the sentence of excommunication against the transgressors of the charters (1253). He had a protection 15 Nov. 1253 for as long as the King remained in Gascony, and was with him there in 1254, but withdrew (having the King's permission) after failing to obtain satisfaction in a matter concerning his jurisdiction as constable. On 18 Dec. 1253 he and his eld. s. Humphrey had licence to hunt hare, fox, cat and other wild beasts in the forests of Bradon and Savernake, Wilts. In 1257 he was appointed to keep the marches between Montgomery and the land of the Earl of G1oucester, and had a protection 22 Oct. on staying in Wales in the service of Prince Edward. In 1258 he was one of the 24 councillors to draw up the Provisions of Oxford, being chosen among the Barons' twelve, and was thereafter one of the fifteen chosen to advise the King on all points; he was also one of the twelve elected by the Barons to represent the community in three annual parliaments, and was one of the 24 who were concerned in treating of aids. In 1259 he was the King's representative (with the Count of Aumale) for the preservation of peace between France and England; was concerned with Llywellyn ap Gruffydd in the matter of the truce; and was one of the commissioners who ratified the treaty between France and England in July. On 10 Aug. 1260 he was sent to treat for peace with Llywellyn, and on 25 Aug. 1262 was one of the commissioners to meet Llywellyn's commissioners at the Ford of Montgomery. He had a grant of the custody of the lands of the late Earl of Gloucester 18 July 1262. In the struggle of 1263/4 he took the side of the King; was one of the keepers of the City of London, 9 Oct. 1265, and one of the plenipotentiaries for the Dictum of Kenilworth." [Complete Peerage 6:459]

    Humphrey married Maud of Eu. Maud (daughter of Raoul I de Lusignan and Alix d'Eu) died on 14 Aug 1241; was buried in Llanthony Priory, outside Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  6. 13.  Maud of Eu (daughter of Raoul I de Lusignan and Alix d'Eu); died on 14 Aug 1241; was buried in Llanthony Priory, outside Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.

    Notes:

    Also called Maud de Lusignan.

    Children:
    1. Alice de Bohun died after 1255.
    2. 6. Humphrey de Bohun was born in in of Havering, Essex, England; died on 27 Oct 1265 in Beeston Castle, Cheshire, England; was buried in Combermere Abbey, Cheshire, England.

  7. 14.  William de Briouze was born in in of Abergavenny, Monmouthshire, Wales (son of Reynold de Briouze and Grace Briwerre); died on 2 May 1230.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: of Totnes, Devon, England

    Notes:

    "William de Briouze, s. and h. by 1st wife. He m. Eve, da. and in her issue coh. of William (Marshal), Earl of Strigul and Pembroke, by Isabel, suo jure Countess of Pembroke. He d. 1 May 1230, being hanged by Llewelyn abovenamed. His widow d. before 1246." [Complete Peerage I:22, as corrected in Volume XIV.]

    Hanged by Llewelyn, Prince of Wales, after intrigues with Llewelyn's wife.

    "He was discovered in Joan's chambers, accused of being her lover, and promptly and publicly hanged. While the story that William and Joan were lovers has been generally accepted, the Annals of Margam (in T. Gale, ed , Historiae Britannicae et Anglicanae Scriptores XX (Oxford, 1687), 2-18, [anno] MCCXXX) implies that the 'intimacy' was devised by Llywelyn to avenge himself on William for political injuries inflicted not only by William but by the entire Braose family; the execution was hailed by the Welsh as a vindication of a blood-feud against the Braoses dating from at least 1176. Indeed, shortly after the execution Llywelyn wrote to William's widow Eva and to William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke, Eva's brother, stating, in effect, that so far as he was concerned, the intended marriage between Llywelyn's son Dafydd and Eva's daughter Isabella could go forward as planned, and that he could not have prevented the Welsh magnates from taking their vengeance. See J. Goronwy Edwards, Calendar of Ancient Correspondence concerning Wales (Board of Celtic Studies of the University of Wales, History and Law Series, 2)(Cardiff, 1935), pp 51-52, nos. XI.56a, 56b. The marriage in fact took place three months later." [William Addams Reitwiesner, "The Children of Joan, Princess of North Wales," The Genealogist 1:80, Spring 1980.]

    William married Eve Marshal. Eve (daughter of William Marshal and Isabel de Clare) died between Jan 1242 and 1246. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  8. 15.  Eve Marshal (daughter of William Marshal and Isabel de Clare); died between Jan 1242 and 1246.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Bef 1246

    Children:
    1. Eve de Briouze died between 20 Jul 1255 and 28 Jul 1255.
    2. Maud de Briouze died on 16 Mar 1301.
    3. 7. Eleanor de Briouze died before 25 Jun 1252; was buried in Llanthony Priory, outside Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.