Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Edmund Mortimer

Male 1352 - 1381  (29 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Edmund Mortimer was born on 1 Feb 1352 in Llangoed in Llyswen, Breconshire, Wales (son of Roger de Mortimer and Philippe de Montagu); died on 27 Dec 1381 in Dominican Friary, Cork, Ireland; was buried in Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, England.

    Notes:

    Earl of March. Earl of Ulster.

    From Wikipeia:

    An infant at the death of his father, Edmund, as a ward of the crown, was placed by Edward III of England under the care of William of Wykeham and Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel.

    The position of the young earl, powerful on account of his possessions and hereditary influence in the Welsh marches, was rendered still more important by his marriage on 24 August 1369 at the age of 17 to the 14-year-old Philippa, the only child of the late Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence, the second son of Edward III.

    Lionel's late wife, Elizabeth, had been daughter and heiress of William Donn de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster, and Lionel had himself been created Earl of Ulster before his marriage. Edmund inherited the title Earl of Ulster on Lionel's death.

    Therefore, the Earl of March not only represented one of the chief Anglo-Norman lordships in Ireland in right of his wife Philippa, but Philippa's line was also the second most senior line of descent in the succession to the crown, after Edward, the Black Prince and his son, King Richard II of England. John of Gaunt, younger brother of Prince Edward, had become the 1st Duke of Lancaster and thus the source of the House of Lancaster's claim to the throne.

    This marriage had, therefore, far-reaching consequences in English history, ultimately giving rise to the claim of the House of York to the crown of England contested in the Wars of the Roses between the Yorks and the Lancasters; Edward IV being descended from the second adult son of Edward III as great-great-grandson of Philippa, countess of March, and in the male line from Edmund of Langley, the first Duke of York and the fourth adult son of Edward III.

    Edmund Mortimer's son Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March would become heir presumptive to the English crown during the reign of Richard II.

    Mortimer, now styled Earl of March and Ulster, became Marshal of England in 1369, and was employed in various diplomatic missions during the next following years. He was a member of the committee appointed by the Peers to confer with the Commons in 1373 - the first instance of such a joint conference since the institution of representative parliaments on the question of granting supplies for John of Gaunt's war in France.

    He participated in the opposition to Edward III and the court party, which grew in strength towards the end of the reign, taking the popular side and being prominent in the Good Parliament of 1376 among the lords who supported the Prince of Wales and opposed the Court Party and John of Gaunt. The Speaker of the House of Commons in this parliament was March's steward, Peter de la Mare, (1294-1387 of Little Hereford, Hereford), who firmly withstood John of Gaunt in stating the grievances of the Commons, in supporting the impeachment of several high court officials, and in procuring the banishment of the king's mistress, Alice Perrers. March was a member of the administrative council appointed by the same parliament after the death of Edward, the Black Prince to attend the king and advise him in all public affairs.

    Following the end of the Good Parliament its acts were reversed by John of Gaunt, March's steward was jailed, and March himself was ordered to inspect Calais and other remote royal castles as part of his duty as Marshal of England. March chose instead to resign the post.

    On the accession of Richard II, a minor, in 1377, the Earl became a member of the standing council of government; though as husband of the heir-presumptive to the crown he wisely abstained from claiming any actual administrative office. The richest and most powerful person in the realm was, however, the king's uncle John of Gaunt, whose jealousy led March to accept the office of Lord Lieutenant of Ireland in 1379. March succeeded in asserting his authority in eastern Ulster, but failed to subdue the O'Neills farther west. Proceeding to Munster to put down the turbulent southern chieftains, March was killed at Cork on 27 December 1381. He was buried in Wigmore Abbey, of which he had been a benefactor, and where his wife Philippa was also interred.

    Edmund married Philippe of Clarence about May 1368 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Philippe (daughter of Lionel of Antwerp and Elizabeth de Burgh) was born on 16 Aug 1355 in Eltham, Kent, England; died before 8 Jan 1378; was buried in Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. Elizabeth Mortimer was born on 12 Feb 1371 in Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales; died on 20 Apr 1417.
    2. Roger Mortimer was born on 11 Apr 1374 in Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales; died on 20 Jul 1398 in Kells, Meath, Ireland; was buried in Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, England.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Roger de Mortimer was born on 11 Nov 1328 in Ludlow, Shropshire, England (son of Edmund de Mortimer and Elizabeth de Badlesmere); died on 26 Feb 1360 in Rouvray, Côte d'Or, Burgundy, France; was buried in Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, England.

    Notes:

    Marshal of England. Warden of the Cinque Ports. Fought at Crécy in the first division, with the Prince of Wales. Founder knight of the Order of the Garter. Summoned to Parliament by writ in 1348. In 1354 he obtained a reversal of the sentence against his grandfather, Roger de Mortimer, and was restored to the title of Earl of March and to all of his grandfather's estates which had been forfeited to the Crown. In the following year he was summoned to Parliament by writ as Earl of March. In October 1359 he accompanied Edward III on his unsuccessful invasion of France. He was appointed Constable of the Host and rode at its head. Thereafter he was with Edward in Burgundy, where he died suddenly in February 1360.

    Roger married Philippe de Montagu. Philippe (daughter of William de Montagu and Katherine de Grandison) died on 5 Jan 1382; was buried in Austin Priory, Bisham, Berkshire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Philippe de Montagu (daughter of William de Montagu and Katherine de Grandison); died on 5 Jan 1382; was buried in Austin Priory, Bisham, Berkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 1. Edmund Mortimer was born on 1 Feb 1352 in Llangoed in Llyswen, Breconshire, Wales; died on 27 Dec 1381 in Dominican Friary, Cork, Ireland; was buried in Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, England.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Edmund de Mortimer was born between 1305 and 1306 in of Wigmore, Herefordshire, England (son of Roger de Mortimer and Joan de Geneville); died before 21 Jan 1332 in Stanton Lacy, Shropshire, England.

    Notes:

    Knighted at the coronation of Edward III, 1 Feb 1327. Summoned to Parliament by writ, 20 Nov 1331. Also in 1331, the king restored to him certain of his father's lands, but as the attainder of his father was not reversed in his lifetime, he was never Earl of March.

    Edmund married Elizabeth de Badlesmere on 27 Jun 1316 in Ernwood in Kinlet, Shropshire, England. Elizabeth (daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare) was born about 1313; died on 8 Jun 1356 in Rochford, Essex, England; was buried in Black Friars, Holborn, London, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  Elizabeth de Badlesmere was born about 1313 (daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare); died on 8 Jun 1356 in Rochford, Essex, England; was buried in Black Friars, Holborn, London, England.
    Children:
    1. 2. Roger de Mortimer was born on 11 Nov 1328 in Ludlow, Shropshire, England; died on 26 Feb 1360 in Rouvray, Côte d'Or, Burgundy, France; was buried in Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire, England.

  3. 6.  William de Montagu was born between 1302 and 1303 in of Shepton Montague, Somerset, England (son of William de Montagu and Elizabeth de Montfort); died on 30 Jan 1344.

    Notes:

    1st Earl of Salisbury. He was the leader of the party that seized Roger de Mortimer at Nottingham Castle on the night of 19 Oct 1330. He died of injuries sustained at a tournament at Windsor.

    William married Katherine de Grandison before 1328. Katherine (daughter of William de Grandison and Sibyl de Tregoz) died on 23 Apr 1349. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 7.  Katherine de Grandison (daughter of William de Grandison and Sibyl de Tregoz); died on 23 Apr 1349.
    Children:
    1. 3. Philippe de Montagu died on 5 Jan 1382; was buried in Austin Priory, Bisham, Berkshire, England.
    2. Sybil Montagu
    3. John de Montagu was born about 1329 in of Wark-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England; died on 25 Feb 1390; was buried in Lady Chapel, Salisbury Cathedral, Wiltshire, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Roger de Mortimer was born on 3 May 1286 in of Wigmore, Herefordshire, England (son of Edmund de Mortimer and Margaret de Fiennes); died on 29 Nov 1330 in Tyburn, Middlesex, England; was buried in Church of the Greyfriars, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: 25 Apr 1287

    Notes:

    Earl of March. Justiciar of Ireland, 1319. Steward of the Household to Queen Isabel, 1325. Justiciar of Wales, 1327.

    From Wikipedia:

    Roger Mortimer, 3rd Baron Mortimer, 1st Earl of March (25 April 1287 - 29 November 1330), was an English nobleman and powerful Marcher lord who gained many estates in the Welsh Marches and Ireland following his advantageous marriage to the wealthy heiress Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville. In November 1316, he was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. He was imprisoned in the Tower of London in 1322 for having led the Marcher lords in a revolt against King Edward II in what became known as the Despenser War. He later escaped to France, where he was joined by Edward's queen consort Isabella, whom he took as his mistress. After he and Isabella led a successful invasion and rebellion, Edward was subsequently deposed; Mortimer allegedly arranged his murder at Berkeley Castle. For three years, Mortimer was de facto ruler of England before being himself overthrown by Edward's eldest son, Edward III. Accused of assuming royal power and other crimes, Mortimer was executed by hanging at Tyburn.

    Roger Mortimer (1286-1330) = Joan de Geneville (d. 1356)
    Blanche Mortimer (1316-1347) = Piers Grandison (b. 1296)
    Isabel Grandison = Baldwin Brugge (b. 1328)
    Thomas Brugge (1355-1408) = Alice Berkeley (1379-1414)
    Gyles Bruges (1396-1466) = Catherine Clifford
    Thomas Bruges (1426-1493) = Florence Darell (1425-1506)
    Henry Brydges (b. 1464) = Anne Hungerford (b. 1468)
    Joane Brydges (b. 1503) = John Gifford (b. 1502)
    Anne Gifford = Thomas Goddard
    Richard Goddard (d. 1614) = Elizabeth Walrond
    Edward Goddard (1584-1647) = Priscilla d'Oyly (1594-1681)
    William Goddard (1630-1691) = Elizabeth Miles (1627-1697)
    Edward Goddard (1675-1754) = Susanna Stone (1675-1754)
    Ebenezer Goddard (1713-1762) = Sybil Brigham (1718-1807)
    Susanna Goddard (1742-1837) = Phineas Howe (1735-1807)
    Abigail Howe (1765-1815) = John Young (1763-1839)
    Brigham Young (1801-1877)

    Brigham Young (1801-1877) = Zina Diantha Huntington (1821-1901)
    Zina Presendia Young (1850-1931) = Charles Ora Card (1839-1906)
    Orson Rega Card (1891-1984) = Lucena Richards (b. 1893)
    Willard Richards Card = Peggy Jane Park
    Orson Scott Card (b. 1951)

    Roger married Joan de Geneville on 20 Sep 1301 in Pembridge, Herefordshire, England. Joan (daughter of Peter de Geneville and Joan de la Marche) was born on 2 Feb 1286; died on 19 Oct 1356. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  Joan de Geneville was born on 2 Feb 1286 (daughter of Peter de Geneville and Joan de la Marche); died on 19 Oct 1356.

    Notes:

    Also spelled Joinville.

    Children:
    1. Katherine de Mortimer died on 4 Aug 1369; was buried in St. Mary's, Warwick, Warwickshire, England.
    2. Joan de Mortimer died after 1337.
    3. Maud de Mortimer died after Aug 1435.
    4. Margaret de Mortimer died on 5 May 1337; was buried in St. Augustine's, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England.
    5. 4. Edmund de Mortimer was born between 1305 and 1306 in of Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died before 21 Jan 1332 in Stanton Lacy, Shropshire, England.

  3. 10.  Bartholomew de Badlesmere was born about 1275 in of Badlesmere, Kent, England (son of Guncelin de Badlesmere); died on 12 Apr 1322 in Canterbury, Kent, England; was buried in Church of the Friars Minor, Canterbury, Kent, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 14 Apr 1322, Canterbury, Kent, England

    Notes:

    Steward of the King's Household; Governor of Leeds, Tunbridge, and Bristol Castles; Sheriff of Glamorgan 1314-15; Constable of Dover Castle and the Cinque Ports. Ambassador to France, Savoy, and the Pope.

    MP (knight of the shire) for Kent, 1306-7. [Royal Ancestry] "Summoned to Parliament from 26 October 1309 by writs directed Bartholomeo de Badlesmere." [Royal Ancestry]

    Unusual in having been, in his lifetime, a member of Parliament both as a "knight of the shire" (chosen by local authorities) and also through being summoned to Parliament by writ.

    Bartholomew de Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare were great-great grandparents of Henry V.

    "He was appointed one of the peers to regulate the royal household in 1310. [...] In Feb. 1316 he was sent to suppress the rebellion of Llewelyn, Prince of Wales. He was one of those appointed as amabassador to Amadeus of Savoy in Dec. 1316. He was appointed ambassador to the Pope in Jan. 1317. In 1319 he and Hugh Despenser the younger were appointed to reform the state of the Duchy of Aquitaine, and to remove all officers there as were unable to fulfill their duties. [...] In March 1320 he was appointed ambassador to the King of France and to the Pope. In Jan. 1321 he was among those who were sent to treat for peace with Robert de Brus, King of Scots. [...] In 1321 he joined the rebellion of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster. In October 1321, while residing at Leeds Castle with her children, his wife, Margaret, refused Queen Isabel admission to the castle. The castle was immediately taken by the king. His wife, Margaret, and their son, Giles, were taken prisoners and conveyed to the Tower of London. A writ was issued to the Sheriff of Gloucestershire to arrest him 26 Dec. 1321. He and other rebellious barons attacked and burned the town of Bridgnorth in Shropshire. SIR BARTHOLOMEW DE BADLESMERE, 1st Lord Badlesmere, fought on the rebel side of the Battle of Boroughbridge 16 March 1322. He was subsequently captured at Stow Park, attainted, and hanged as a traitor at Canterbury, Kent 14 April 1322." [Royal Ancestry]

    "Bartholomew of Badlesmere. of Badlesmere and Chilham Castle, Kent, s. and h. of Guncelin or Gunselm B., of Badlesmere afsd., Justice of Chester, was excused from service in the war in Gascony (1294) 22 Edw. I; suc. his father in 1301, being then aged 26; was in the Scottish wars 1303 and 1304; Governor of Bristol Castle 1307; had a grant of the Castle and Manor of Chilham, Kent, 1309, and from 26 Oct. (1309) 3 Edw. II, to 15 May (1321) 14 Edw. II, was sum. to Parl. by writs directed Bartholomeo de Badlesmere whereby he may be held to have become Lord Badlesmere. He obtained a grant of the Castle of Leeds in Kent, and in (1314-15) 8 Edw. II, was made Governor of Skipton Castle, and of all the castles in Yorkshire and Westmorland whereof Robert de Clifford had d. seized. He was also Steward of the King's Household. Notwithstanding the many favours he had received, he joined the Earl of Lancaster in his rebellion, and was defeated with him at Boroughbridge, 16 Mar. 1322, captured at Stow Park, attainted, and hung as a traitor at Canterbury, 14 Apr. 1322. He is described in the contemporary Boroughbridge Roll as a Banneret. He m., before 30 June 1308, Margaret, widow of Gilbert de Umfreville (who d. before 23 May 1303, s. and h. ap. of Gilbert 8th Earl of Angus), aunt and coh. of Thomas de Clare, Steward of the Forest of Essex, da. of Thomas de C., by Julian, (not Amy), da. of Sir Maurice fitz Maurice, Lord Justice of Ireland. He d. as afsd, 1322. His widow, notorious for having refused the Queen admission to the Royal Castle of Leeds in the summer of 1321, was besieged therein by Edward II, and being captured with the Castle on 1 1 Nov. following, was imprisoned in the Tower of London, but was released 3 Nov. 1322, and after staying some time at the Minorites without Aldgate, at the King's charge (2s. a day), had leave to go to her friends, 1 July 1324. She, who was aged 40 in Mar. 1326/7, had dower on lands at Castlecombe, Wilts, &c., and d. late in 1333." [Complete Peerage I:371-72, as corrected by Volume XIV.]

    Bartholomew married Margaret de Clare before 29 Sep 1305. Margaret (daughter of Thomas de Clare and Juliane fitz Maurice) was born between 1286 and 1287; died in 1333. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 11.  Margaret de Clare was born between 1286 and 1287 (daughter of Thomas de Clare and Juliane fitz Maurice); died in 1333.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Abt 1287
    • Alternate death: Between 22 Oct 1333 and 3 Jan 1334

    Notes:

    "[Bartholomew's] widow, Margaret, continued a prisoner in the Tower of London for several months. Through the mediation of her son-in-law, William de Roos, Knt., she obtained her freedom 3 Nov. 1322. She subsequently retired to the convent house of the Minorite Sisters without Aldgate, and had two shillings per day allowed for her maintenance. In 1327 she petitioned the king and council, stating that while she was in the king's prison, Robert de Welles, husband of her younger sister, Maud de Clare, with the aid and maintenance of Hugh de Despenser, had the lands of their Clare inheritance assessed, and took Maud's share, both in England and Ireland; Margaret requested that the division be made again, according to the assessments returned in Chancery, and that she might have her choice of her share, as she is the elder sister, which request was granted." [Royal Ancestry]

    Children:
    1. Margery de Badlesmere was born about 1306; died on 18 Oct 1363.
    2. Maud de Badlesmere was born about 1308; died on 24 May 1366; was buried in Earl's Colne Priory, Halstead, Essex, England.
    3. 5. Elizabeth de Badlesmere was born about 1313; died on 8 Jun 1356 in Rochford, Essex, England; was buried in Black Friars, Holborn, London, England.
    4. Margaret de Badlesmere was born on 3 Dec 1314; died between 1344 and 1347.

  5. 12.  William de Montagu was born about 1285 in of Shepton Montague, Somerset, England (son of Simon de Montagu and Hawise de St. Amand); died on 18 Oct 1319 in Gascony, France; was buried in Bruton Priory, Somerset, England.

    Other Events:

    • Buried: Aquitaine, France
    • Buried: Priory of St. Frideswide (now Christ Church), Oxford, Oxfordshire, England

    Notes:

    King's yeoman, King's bachelor, Steward of the King's Household, Keeper of Abingdon Abbey 1318, Seneschal of Gascony 1318-19.

    "He was sum. to Parl. 20 Nov 1317 and later." [Complete Peerage]

    From the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography:

    Between 1301 and 1304 William Montagu [...] made his mark in the Scottish wars. In 1302, described as king's yeoman, he was entrusted with the supervision of shipping for the war. In 1306, like many of his illustrious contemporaries, he was knighted along with Edward, prince of Wales. In 1314 he was keeper of Berwick. This military experience served him well, for it is as 'commander of the royal cavalry' (prefectus militie regis) in 1316, a description accorded to him by the Vita Edwardi secundi, that he first emerged as an important servant of the king (Vita Edwardi secundi, 68). In that year he played a leading part in suppressing the revolt of Llywelyn Bren (d. 1318) in Glamorgan and in settling the disputes between the townspeople of Bristol and Bartholomew Badlesmere (d. 1322), the constable of the castle there. In November 1316 he was appointed steward of the royal household. The material rewards of his stewardship included a pension of 200 marks, the absolution of his father's debts, forfeited lands in Cumberland, a quay on the Thames, and the marriage of Joan, one of the heirs of Theobald de Verdon, which he bestowed upon his younger son. He also acted as a channel of patronage for others and a number of grants were made on his information. By influencing the king and making himself a lynchpin in the relationships which bound Edward II to his courtier supporters Montagu developed the importance of the stewardship, which after his death became an important focus of contention among the rival magnates and the particular object of the earl of Lancaster's ambitions.

    Montagu was relieved of the stewardship on 16 November 1318 and replaced by Badlesmere. This was almost certainly a concession to Thomas of Lancaster who had accused Montagu of combining with Roger Damory to plot against his life, a factor which delayed his reconciliation with the king. Lancaster's deep suspicion of Montagu is one of the clearest signs that the courtiers around Edward II were his ardent supporters, rather than a 'middle party' as was once thought. On 20 November Montagu was appointed seneschal of Gascony and Aquitaine and governor of the Île d'Oléron. Although prestigious, this appointment was an effective demotion since it withdrew him from the centre of affairs, so reducing his influence over the king. [...] The permanent loss of his forceful presence and military experience disadvantaged the king in the troubled years which followed.

    William married Elizabeth de Montfort after 20 Jun 1292. Elizabeth (daughter of Peter de Montfort and Maud de la Mare) was born in in of Beaudesert, Warwickshire, England; died on 16 Aug 1354; was buried in Priory of St. Frideswide (now Christ Church), Oxford, Oxfordshire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  6. 13.  Elizabeth de Montfort was born in in of Beaudesert, Warwickshire, England (daughter of Peter de Montfort and Maud de la Mare); died on 16 Aug 1354; was buried in Priory of St. Frideswide (now Christ Church), Oxford, Oxfordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 19 Aug 1354
    • Alternate death: 29 Aug 1354

    Notes:

    Also called Alice. Called Elizabeth in her IPM.

    Children:
    1. Alice de Montagu died before 1345.
    2. Hawise de Montagu died after 13 Oct 1361.
    3. 6. William de Montagu was born between 1302 and 1303 in of Shepton Montague, Somerset, England; died on 30 Jan 1344.

  7. 14.  William de Grandison was born about 1243 in of Ashperton, Ledbury, Herefordshire, England (son of Pierre de Grandison and Agnès de Neufchâtel); died on 17 Jun 1335.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 27 Jun 1335

    Notes:

    Served in the household of Edmund "Crouchback", Earl of Lancaster. Fought in the Scottish wars; was at the seige of Caerlaverock.

    Summoned to Parliament by writs dated from 6 Feb 1299 to 10 Oct 1325.

    William married Sibyl de Tregoz before 1286. Sibyl (daughter of John de Tregoz and Mabel Fitzwarine) was born about 1272; died on 21 Oct 1334 in Dore, Herefordshire, England; was buried in Dore Abbey, Herefordshire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  8. 15.  Sibyl de Tregoz was born about 1272 (daughter of John de Tregoz and Mabel Fitzwarine); died on 21 Oct 1334 in Dore, Herefordshire, England; was buried in Dore Abbey, Herefordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 22 Oct 1334
    • Alternate death: 27 Oct 1334

    Children:
    1. Mabel de Grandison was born in in of Ashperton, Ledbury, Herefordshire, England; died after 1350; was buried in Grey Friars, Bedford, Bedfordshire, England.
    2. 7. Katherine de Grandison died on 23 Apr 1349.
    3. Agnes de Grandison died on 3 Dec 1348.