Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Devorguille de Burgh

Female 1266 - 1284  (~ 29 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Devorguille de Burgh was born between 1255 and 1266 (daughter of John de Burgh and Cecily de Balliol); died in 1284; was buried in Dunmow Priory, Little Dunmow, Essex, England.

    Devorguille married Robert Fitz Walter in 1259. Robert (son of Walter fitz Robert and Ida Longespée) was born in 1247 in Henham, Essex, England; died on 18 Jan 1326. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. Christian de Burgh died before 6 Dec 1315 in Holywell Priory, Shorewell, Middlesex, England.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  John de Burgh was born about 1235 in of Walkern, Hertfordshire, England (son of John de Burgh and Hawise de Lanvallay); died before 3 Mar 1280.

    John married Cecily de Balliol. Cecily (daughter of John de Balliol and Devorguille of Galloway) died before 1273. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Cecily de Balliol (daughter of John de Balliol and Devorguille of Galloway); died before 1273.
    Children:
    1. 1. Devorguille de Burgh was born between 1255 and 1266; died in 1284; was buried in Dunmow Priory, Little Dunmow, Essex, England.
    2. Hawise de Burgh was born about 1258; died before 24 Mar 1299.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  John de Burgh was born in 1210 in of Burgh, Norfolk, England (son of Hubert de Burgh and Beatrix de Warenne); died before 7 Jan 1275.

    Notes:

    Constable of the Tower of London.

    John married Hawise de Lanvallay before 1227. Hawise (daughter of William de Lanvallay and Maud Pecche) died in 1249; was buried in St. John's Abbey, Colchester, Essex, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  Hawise de Lanvallay (daughter of William de Lanvallay and Maud Pecche); died in 1249; was buried in St. John's Abbey, Colchester, Essex, England.
    Children:
    1. 2. John de Burgh was born about 1235 in of Walkern, Hertfordshire, England; died before 3 Mar 1280.

  3. 6.  John de Balliol (son of Hugh de Balliol and Cecily de Fontaines); died before 27 Oct 1268.

    Notes:

    Father of John II de Balliol, king of Scotland from 1292 to 1296.

    From Wikipedia:

    [He] was a leading figure of Scottish and Anglo-Norman life. [...] It is believed that he was educated at Durham School in the city of Durham.

    In 1223, Lord John married Dervorguilla of Galloway, the daughter of Alan, Lord of Galloway and Margaret of Huntingdon. By the mid-thirteenth century, he and his wife had become very wealthy, principally as a result of inheritances from Dervorguilla's family. This wealth allowed Balliol to play a prominent public role, and, on Henry III's instruction, he served as joint protector of the young king of Scots, Alexander III. He was one of Henry III's leading counsellors between 1258 and 1265 and was appointed Sheriff of Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire from 1261 to 1262. He was captured at the battle of Lewes in 1264 but escaped and rejoined King Henry. [...]

    Following a dispute with the Bishop of Durham, he agreed to provide funds for scholars studying at Oxford. Support for a house of students began in around 1263; further endowments after his death, supervised by Dervorguilla, resulted in the establishment of Balliol College.

    John married Devorguille of Galloway in 1233. Devorguille (daughter of Alan fitz Roland and Margaret of Huntingdon) died on 28 Jan 1290; was buried in Sweet Heart Abbey, Galloway, Scotland. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 7.  Devorguille of Galloway (daughter of Alan fitz Roland and Margaret of Huntingdon); died on 28 Jan 1290; was buried in Sweet Heart Abbey, Galloway, Scotland.
    Children:
    1. Eleanor de Balliol
    2. 3. Cecily de Balliol died before 1273.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Hubert de Burgh was born about 1170 (son of Walter de Burgh and Alice); died in 1243; was buried in Black Friars, Holborn, London, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Bef 5 May 1243, Banstead, Surrey, England
    • Alternate death: 12 May 1243

    Notes:

    Earl of Kent. Chief justiciar of England and Ireland. "[H]as been wrongly said to have been the son of a brother of William fitz Aldhelm, steward of Henry II. It is possible, though doubtful, that his father was the Walter whose daughter Adelina, with her son William, owed 40 marks in the pipe roll of 26 Henry II (1179/80) for recognition of their right to a knight's fee at Burgh, Norfolk. His mother's name was Alice, for in his grant (c.1230) of the advowson of the church of Oulton to the prior of Walsingham, Hubert stated that the gift was 'for the soul of my mother Alice who rests in the church at Walsingham' (BL, Cotton MS Nero E.vii, fol. 91). His elder brother was William de Burgh (d. 1206) who, in 1185, accompanied the king's youngest son, John, to Ireland, where he eventually became lord of Connacht; William's son would later refer to Hubert as uncle." [Oxford Dictionary of National Biography]

    Before his fall, one of the most powerful men in England in the reigns of both John and his successor Henry III. During the childhood of the latter, De Burgh was for a time regent in all but name.

    Hubert married Beatrix de Warenne after 1208. Beatrix (daughter of William de Warenne and Beatrix de Pierrepont) was born in in of Wormegay, Norfolk, England; died before 12 Dec 1214. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  Beatrix de Warenne was born in in of Wormegay, Norfolk, England (daughter of William de Warenne and Beatrix de Pierrepont); died before 12 Dec 1214.
    Children:
    1. 4. John de Burgh was born in 1210 in of Burgh, Norfolk, England; died before 7 Jan 1275.

  3. 10.  William de Lanvallay was born in in of Walkern, Hertfordshire, England (son of William de Lanvallay and Hawise de Buckland); died before 3 Oct 1217; was buried in St. John's Abbey, Colchester, Essex, England.

    Notes:

    Constable of Colchester castle. Magna Carta surety.

    William married Maud Pecche. Maud (daughter of Gilbert Pecche and Alice fitz Walter) died before 1233; was buried in St. John's Abbey, Colchester, Essex, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 11.  Maud Pecche (daughter of Gilbert Pecche and Alice fitz Walter); died before 1233; was buried in St. John's Abbey, Colchester, Essex, England.
    Children:
    1. 5. Hawise de Lanvallay died in 1249; was buried in St. John's Abbey, Colchester, Essex, England.

  5. 12.  Hugh de Balliol was born in in of Barnard Castle, Durham, England (son of Eustace de Balliol); died after 1217.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 1228

    Notes:

    Father of John I de Balliol, who founded Balliol College, and grandfather of John II de Balliol, king of Scotland from 1292 to 1296.

    Hugh married Cecily de Fontaines. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  6. 13.  Cecily de Fontaines (daughter of Aléaume de Fontaines).
    Children:
    1. Ada de Balliol died on 29 Jul 1251 in Stokesley, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 6. John de Balliol died before 27 Oct 1268.

  7. 14.  Alan fitz Roland (son of Roland fitz Uchtred and Ellen de Morville); died about 2 Feb 1234; was buried in Dundrennan Abbey, Kircudbright, Scotland.

    Notes:

    Also called Alan of Galloway. Hereditary Constable of Scotland.

    Present at Magna Carta as an advisor to King John.

    From the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography:

    "Cross-border landholding and kinship with King John of England made Alan a man of consequence in both realms. His relationship with the king of Scots, based on loose overlordship rather than feudal subordination, allowed freedom of manoeuvre where his actions did not conflict with Scottish interests. Galloway's military resources and substantial fleet gave added influence; Alan's aid was courted unsuccessfully by John for his 1210 campaign against the Ulster Lacys, but he agreed to send one thousand men for the abortive Welsh campaign of 1212. [...]

    "From 1225 Alan used the freedom afforded by the loose overlordship of the Scottish crown to interfere in the feud between King Ragnvald of Man and his half-brother, Olaf. His private interest, arising from efforts to secure Antrim with Ragnvald's support against the threat of a Lacy restoration, coincided at first with Anglo-Scottish policy towards the region and received the tacit support of his Scottish overlord. The prospect of a pro-Scottish client in Man led Alexander II to acquiesce to the marriage in 1226 of Alan's bastard son, Thomas, to Ragnvald's daughter, but the marriage provoked revolt against Ragnvald. Despite the support of Galwegian galleys and warriors, Ragnvald was overthrown and slain in 1229 by Olaf. Alan's ensuing attempts to conquer Man for Thomas destabilized the Hebrides and western highlands, thereby threatening Scottish territorial interests, and in 1230–31 prompted active Norwegian support for Olaf. Joint action by Alan and Alexander averted catastrophe, but Scottish and Galwegian interests had diverged and the 1231 campaign marked the end of further Galwegian involvement in the Manx succession; Alan's dynastic ambitions had caused an undesirable war with a major foreign power."

    From Wikipedia:

    "Although under the traditional Celtic custom of Galloway, Alan's illegitimate son could have succeeded to the Lordship of Galloway, under the feudal custom of the Scottish realm, Alan's nearest heirs were his surviving daughters. Using Alan's death as an opportunity to further integrate Galloway within his realm, Alexander forced the partition of the lordship amongst Alan's daughters. Alan was the last legitimate ruler of Galloway, descending from the native dynasty of Fergus, Lord of Galloway."

    Alan married Margaret of Huntingdon in 1209. Margaret (daughter of David of Scotland and Maud of Chester) died about 6 Jan 1233. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  8. 15.  Margaret of Huntingdon (daughter of David of Scotland and Maud of Chester); died about 6 Jan 1233.
    Children:
    1. 7. Devorguille of Galloway died on 28 Jan 1290; was buried in Sweet Heart Abbey, Galloway, Scotland.