Nielsen Hayden genealogy

William de Ferrers

Male 1333 - 1371  (37 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  William de Ferrers was born on 28 Feb 1333 in Newbold Verdon, Leicestershire, England (son of Henry de Ferrers and Isabel de Verdun); died on 8 Jan 1371 in Stebbing, Essex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Baptised: 28 Feb 1333, Newbold Verdon, Leicestershire, England

    Notes:

    He was summoned to Parliament by writs dated 15 Mar 1354 to 6 Apr 1369. He accompanied the Prince of Wales to Gascony in 1355, and was at the battle of Poitiers in 1356.

    William married Margaret de Ufford before 25 Apr 1344. Margaret (daughter of Robert de Ufford and Margaret de Norwich) died before 1368. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. Margaret Ferrers died on 22 Jan 1407; was buried in St. Mary's, Warwick, Warwickshire, England.
    2. Henry de Ferrers was born on 16 Feb 1356 in Tilty Abbey, Essex, England; died on 3 Feb 1388.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Henry de Ferrers was born about 1303 (son of William de Ferrers and (Unknown) de Segrave); died on 15 Sep 1343 in Groby in Ratby, Leicestershire, England; was buried in Ulverscroft Priory, Leicestershire, England.

    Notes:

    He was summoned to Parliament by writ from 25 Jan 1330 to 15 Nov 1338. He was one of the "Disinherited" who took part in the invasion of Scotland by Edward de Balliol in 1332. He was with the king at the battle of Sluys in 1340.

    Henry married Isabel de Verdun before 20 Feb 1331. Isabel (daughter of Thebaud de Verdun and Elizabeth de Clare) was born on 21 Mar 1317 in Amesbury, Wiltshire, England; died on 25 Jul 1349. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Isabel de Verdun was born on 21 Mar 1317 in Amesbury, Wiltshire, England (daughter of Thebaud de Verdun and Elizabeth de Clare); died on 25 Jul 1349.

    Notes:

    Given the date of her death and her relative youth at the time, it's likely that she died of the plague.

    Children:
    1. 1. William de Ferrers was born on 28 Feb 1333 in Newbold Verdon, Leicestershire, England; died on 8 Jan 1371 in Stebbing, Essex, England.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  William de Ferrers was born on 30 Jan 1272 in Yoxall, Staffordshire, England (son of William de Ferrers and Anne Durward); died on 20 Mar 1325.

    Notes:

    He fought at the battle of Falkirk, 22 Jul 1298, and was present at the siege of Caerlaverock Castle in 1300. He was summoned to Parliament by writs, 29 Dec 1299 to 24 Sep 1324.

    William married (Unknown) de Segrave. (Unknown) (daughter of John de Segrave and Christian de Plessets) died before 1316. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  (Unknown) de Segrave (daughter of John de Segrave and Christian de Plessets); died before 1316.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Aft 9 Feb 1317

    Notes:

    Possibly named Ellen or Margaret.

    Children:
    1. Anne de Ferrers died on 8 Aug 1367.
    2. 2. Henry de Ferrers was born about 1303; died on 15 Sep 1343 in Groby in Ratby, Leicestershire, England; was buried in Ulverscroft Priory, Leicestershire, England.

  3. 6.  Thebaud de Verdun was born on 8 Sep 1278 in of Alton, Staffordshire, England (son of Thebaud de Verdun and Margery de Bohun); died on 27 Jul 1316 in Alton, Staffordshire, England; was buried in Croxden Abbey, Staffordshire, England.

    Notes:

    Fought at Falkirk. Justiciar of Ireland, 30 Apr 1313 - Jan 1315. He was summoned to Parliament by writs from 29 Dec 1299 to 16 Oct 1315.

    Thebaud married Elizabeth de Clare on 4 Feb 1316 in near Bristol, Gloucestershire, England. Elizabeth (daughter of Gilbert de Clare and Joan of Acre) was born in Nov 1295 in Caerphilly, Glamorgan, Wales; died on 4 Nov 1360. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 7.  Elizabeth de Clare was born in Nov 1295 in Caerphilly, Glamorgan, Wales (daughter of Gilbert de Clare and Joan of Acre); died on 4 Nov 1360.
    Children:
    1. 3. Isabel de Verdun was born on 21 Mar 1317 in Amesbury, Wiltshire, England; died on 25 Jul 1349.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  William de Ferrers was born about 1240 in of Groby, Leicestershire, England (son of William de Ferrers and Margaret de Quincy); died before 20 Dec 1287.

    Notes:

    He was never married to an Anne (or a Joan) Despenser, as widely reported in 19th- and 20th-century secondary sources.

    William married Anne Durward in 1270. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  Anne Durward (daughter of Alan Durward and Marjory of Scotland).
    Children:
    1. 4. William de Ferrers was born on 30 Jan 1272 in Yoxall, Staffordshire, England; died on 20 Mar 1325.

  3. 10.  John de Segrave was born in in of Chacombe, Northamptonshire, England (son of Nicholas de Segrave and Maud de Lucy); died before 4 Oct 1325 in Aquitaine, France; was buried in Chaucombe Priory, Chaucombe, Northamptonshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Abt 1256, of Segrave, Leicestershire, England

    Notes:

    Justice of the Forest beyond Trent; King's Lieutenant (or Keeper) of Scotland.

    "A knight in Aug 1282; served in Wales, 1285, in Ireland, 1287, and in Scotland in 1291 and 1297-1322. He was a principal commander at the victorious battle of Falkirk, 22 July 1298; was at the siege of Caerlaverock, July 1300, being then a knight banneret, and was captured by the Scots following the English defeat at Bannockburn, 24 June 1314 and released following a year of captivity. Appointed Warden of Scotland, 10 Mar 1309 and again, 10 Apr 1310." [The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, citation details below.]

    John married Christian de Plessets in 1270. Christian (daughter of Hugh de Plessets) died after 8 May 1331. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 11.  Christian de Plessets (daughter of Hugh de Plessets); died after 8 May 1331.

    Notes:

    Also called de Plescy, de Plessy, de Plessis.

    Children:
    1. 5. (Unknown) de Segrave died before 1316.
    2. Christian de Segrave died after 1332.
    3. Stephen de Segrave was born about 1285 in of West Hatch, Wiltshire, England; died before 12 Dec 1325 in Aquitaine, France; was buried in Chaucombe Priory, Chaucombe, Northamptonshire, England.

  5. 12.  Thebaud de Verdun was born about 1248 in of Alton, Staffordshire, England (son of John de Verdun and Margaret de Lacy); died on 24 Aug 1309 in Alton, Staffordshire, England; was buried in Croxden Abbey, Staffordshire, England.

    Notes:

    He was summoned to Parliament by writs from 24 Jun 1295 to 11 Jun 1309. Styled himself constable of Ireland, 1282-84.

    Thebaud married Margery de Bohun before 6 Nov 1276. Margery (daughter of Humphrey de Bohun and Maud of Avenbury) died between 1280 and 1304. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  6. 13.  Margery de Bohun (daughter of Humphrey de Bohun and Maud of Avenbury); died between 1280 and 1304.

    Notes:

    She has long been widely held to be a daughter of the Humphrey de Bohun who died in 1265, in the lifetime of his father, and who as a result never held the earlship of Hereford possessed by both his father and his son.

    In a 2 Dec 2020 post to soc.genealogy.medieval, Peter Stewart argued that she may instead have been a daughter of that Humphrey's father, the Humphrey de Bohun who d. 1275, by his second wife, Maud of Avenbury.

    In a 3 Dec 2020 post, Douglas Richardson defended her placement as a daughter of the Humphrey de Bohun who d.s.p. in 1265.

    In subsequent posts in the thread, Peter Stewart defended his position, in particular making the point that if this Margery de Bohun had been a daughter of Humphrey de Bohun who d. 1265 and his (only) wife Eleanor de Briouze, her son Thebaud de Verdun's 1302 marriage to his first wife Maud de Mortimer, which produced issue, would have been a marriage of second cousins, both of them being great-grandchildren of William de Briouze and Eve Marshal.

    No record exists of a dispensation for this Verdun-Mortimer marriage in the 4-volume published records of the pope of that time, Boniface VIII. Stewart pointed out that Boniface is known to have believed that dispensations from consanguinity rules should only be given for reasons such as the general good of the realm, and that the Verduns and Mortimers were "not in a league where this sort of reason could be proposed." As Stewart pointed out, "Defiance of canon law was not undertaken lightly in that era. The upside of trying, at the Verdun-Mortimer stratum of rank and power anyway, was hardly worth the very foreseeable downside."

    This, combined with the chronological problems which are resolved by placing this Margary as a daughter of the older Humphrey de Bohun by his second wife, convinces us that this is likelier to be the correct solution.

    Children:
    1. 6. Thebaud de Verdun was born on 8 Sep 1278 in of Alton, Staffordshire, England; died on 27 Jul 1316 in Alton, Staffordshire, England; was buried in Croxden Abbey, Staffordshire, England.

  7. 14.  Gilbert de Clare was born on 2 Sep 1243 in Christchurch, Hampshire, England (son of Richard de Clare and Maud de Lacy); died on 7 Dec 1295 in Monmouth Castle, Monmouthshire, Wales; was buried in Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 1299

    Notes:

    Called "Red Gilbert" and "The Red Earl". Earl of Gloucester. Earl of Hertford. Steward of St. Edmund's Abbey. Held, among many other manors and lordships, the lordship of Glamorgan, one of the most wealthy holdings in the Welsh Marches. Built Caerphilly Castle.

    A turbulent figure who fought on both sides of the Second Barons' War of 1263-64, first alongside Simon de Montfort at the battle of Lewes (where according to some accounts he personally took Henry III prisoner), and then on the side of the king, commanding one of the royal divisions at the decisive battle of Evesham where de Montfort was killed.

    His subsequent relationships with Henry III and Edward I were complex and fraught. As one of the two or three most powerful non-royal individuals in the realm, he was both a desirable ally and also the very model of the kind of overweening subject that Edward was determined to tame -- and ultimately did.

    As a side note, it is worth noting that while de Clare was still allied to the baronial party, he led the massacre of the Jews at Canterbury, which took place while other rebel leaders were conducting similar massacres in London. Ian Stone writes in "The Rebel Barons of 1264 and the Commune of London," quoted here: "The Dunstable annals report rumours that the Jews of London were preparing to betray the citizens: they had Greek fire to burn the city, copies of the keys to the city gates, and subterranean passages to each gate. Such tales were used to excuse an outbreak of looting and murder. One chronicler says that the Jews were suspected of betraying the barons and citizens, and almost all were killed. Another says that the Jewish quarter was pillaged, and any Jews who were caught were stripped, robbed and murdered. Estimates of the number killed range from 200 to 500, with the remainder forcibly converted or imprisoned (or, looking at it another way, the rest were saved by the justices and the mayor, who sent them to the Tower for protection). The chronicler Wykes, who tended to be less favourable to the baronial party, singled out the baronial leader John fitz John, who was said to have killed the leading Jew, Kok son of Abraham, with his own hands, and seized his treasure. Fitz John was then forced to share the proceeds with Simon de Montfort. It is possible that de Montfort was taking the Jewish treasure, not to enrich himself, but to finance his forces. At the same time, the cash of Italian and French merchants, deposited in religious houses around London, was also seized and taken to the city."

    Gilbert married Joan of Acre in May 1290 in Westminster Abbey, Westminster, Middlesex, England. Joan (daughter of Edward I, King of England and Eleanor of Castile, Queen Consort of England) was born in 1272 in Acre, Palestine; died on 23 Apr 1307 in Clare, Suffolk, England; was buried in Austin Friars, Clare, Suffolk, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  8. 15.  Joan of Acre was born in 1272 in Acre, Palestine (daughter of Edward I, King of England and Eleanor of Castile, Queen Consort of England); died on 23 Apr 1307 in Clare, Suffolk, England; was buried in Austin Friars, Clare, Suffolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 7 Apr 1307
    • Alternate death: 28 Apr 1307, Clare, Suffolk, England

    Notes:

    Also called Joan of England.

    "The agreement for Joan's marriage to Gilbert de Clare, earl of Hertford and Gloucester, was made in 1283. Gilbert and his first wife, Alice de la Marche, had had only two daughters; this marriage was dissolved in 1285, and a papal dispensation for the marriage to Joan was obtained four years later. Gilbert surrendered all his lands to the king, and they were settled jointly on Gilbert and Joan for their lives, and were then to pass to their children; if however the marriage was childless, the lands were to pass to Joan's children by any later marriage. The wedding took place at Westminster in early May 1290." [Oxford Dictionary of National Biography]

    Because of this agreement, Joan remained in control of the estates following Gilbert's death in 1295. Her father intended for her to marry Amadeus V of Savoy, but instead she secretly married Ralph de Monthermer, a squire of Earl Gilbert's household whom she had previously persuaded her father to knight. "She is reputed to have said 'It is not ignominious or shameful for a great and powerful earl to marry a poor and weak woman; in the reverse case it is neither reprehensible or difficult for a countess to promote a vigorous young man.'" [Oxford Dictionary of National Biography] Her enraged father slapped de Monthermer into prison and seized all of Joan's lands, but through the mediation of Anthony Bek, Bishop of Durham, father and daughter were reconciled and her estates restored to her. Subsequently the king "became much attached to his new son-in-law, who was summoned to Parliament as Earl of Gloucester and Hertford during the minority of his step-son Gilbert de Clare." [Royal Ancestry] De Monthermer went on to serve in a variety of offices and military roles.

    Notes:

    Royal Ancestry gives the date of their marriage as 23 April 1290; Complete Peerage as 30 April; the ODNB as "early May."

    Children:
    1. Margaret de Clare was born about 1292 in Caerphilly, Glamorgan, Wales; died on 9 Apr 1342; was buried in Queenhithe, London, England.
    2. Eleanor de Clare was born in Oct 1292 in Caerphilly, Glamorgan, Wales; died on 30 Jun 1337.
    3. 7. Elizabeth de Clare was born in Nov 1295 in Caerphilly, Glamorgan, Wales; died on 4 Nov 1360.