Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Constant Kirtland

Male 1727 - 1792  (64 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Constant Kirtland was born on 24 Dec 1727 in Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut (son of John Kirtland and Lydia); died on 3 Feb 1792 in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut; was buried in Center Street Cemetery, Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut.

    Constant married Rachel Brockett on 19 Apr 1753 in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut. Rachel (daughter of Isaac Brockett and Mary Sedgwick) was born on 23 May 1732 in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut; died on 17 Feb 1812 in Northford, New Haven, Connecticut; was buried in Center Street Cemetery, Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. John Kirtland was born on 20 Dec 1759 in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut; died on 19 May 1843 in Granville, Washington, New York.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  John Kirtland was born on 11 Jul 1681 in Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut (son of John Kirtland and Lydia Pratt).

    John married Lydia. Lydia died on 7 Nov 1749 in Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut; was buried in Cypress Cemetery, Old Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Lydia died on 7 Nov 1749 in Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut; was buried in Cypress Cemetery, Old Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut.

    Notes:

    Sometimes called Lydia Baldwin; often called Lydia Belden. Her gravestone says that she died in "the 60 year of her age". She is often said to be a daughter of John Belden (1658-1714) and Dorothy Willard, but of their two daughters named Lydia, the one who was born between 59 and 60 years before the death of our Lydia died three days short of her third birthday, in 1693. Their second daughter named Lydia was born 30 Nov 1694 and would therefore have been just short of 55 when our Lydia died on 7 Nov 1749. Our conclusion is that we don't actually know who this Lydia's parents were. They may even have been named Baldwin after all.

    Children:
    1. 1. Constant Kirtland was born on 24 Dec 1727 in Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut; died on 3 Feb 1792 in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut; was buried in Center Street Cemetery, Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  John Kirtland was born in Aug 1659 in Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts (son of Nathaniel Kirtland and Parnell).

    John married Lydia Pratt on 18 Nov 1679 in Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  Lydia Pratt (daughter of William Pratt and Elizabeth Clark).
    Children:
    1. 2. John Kirtland was born on 11 Jul 1681 in Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Nathaniel Kirtland was born before 14 Nov 1613 (son of Philip Kirtland); died before 27 Dec 1686; was buried on 27 Dec 1686 in Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts.

    Other Events:

    • Baptised: 14 Nov 1613, Sherington, Buckinghamshire, England

    Notes:

    Emigrated in 1635 on the Hopewell. First at Lynn, then Southampton, then back to Lynn by 1647.

    Nathaniel married Parnell before 1644. Parnell died between 16 Sep 1694 and 17 Dec 1694. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  Parnell died between 16 Sep 1694 and 17 Dec 1694.
    Children:
    1. Sarah Kirtland was born about 1644 in Southampton, Long Island, New Netherland; died on 21 May 1676 in Lyme, New London, Connecticut.
    2. 4. John Kirtland was born in Aug 1659 in Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts.

  3. 10.  William Pratt was born on 6 Jun 1609 in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, England (son of Rev. William Pratt and Elizabeth); died after 9 May 1678 in Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut.

    Notes:

    His name is on the Founders Monument in downtown Hartford.

    F. W. Chapman's The Pratt Family (1864) asserted that William and his older brother John Pratt were sons of the Rev. William Pratt of Stevenage, Hertfordshire. This conclusion was attacked in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register's review of Pratt's book the following year, which pointed out that the birthdates of the John and William known to have been the sons of the Rev. William Pratt would have made them far too young to have emigrated to New England and become prominent early citizens of Connecticut by 1636. This same criticism was repeated with great force by Donald Lines Jacobus in Hale, House and Related Families (1952; citation details below).

    But in 1995 Matthew J. Grow published "A Belated Reply: The English Origins of John and William Pratt of Connecticut" (NEHGR; citation details below), in which he demonstrated that the original Stevenage parish record had been rebound with pages out of order, and that a careful study of the original artifact, plus examination of the bishop's transcript (to which the original 1857 Pratt researchers, Mormon missionaries Orson Pratt and Charles Penrose, would not have had access), yielded baptismal dates for John and William Pratt that are fully consistent with the other known events of their lives. This problem solved, the other evidence (wills, marriage records, known associations, on-the-record allusions by individuals to their kinship with other individuals) adds up to a satisfactorily strong case for John and William as sons of the Rev. William.

    Further from Hale, House and Related Families (citation details below):

    William Pratt was appointed Lieutenant of the Saybrook Train Band, Oct. 1661. He was Deputy for Saybrook to the Conn. General Court or Assembly, at the sesions of Oct. 1666, Oct. 1667, Oct. 1668, May and Oct. 1669, Oct. 1670, May and Oct. 1671, May 1672, May and Oct. 1673, May and Oct. 1674, May and Oct. 1675, May and Oct. 1676, May and Oct. 1677, and May 1678. He was Commissioner (justice) for Saybrook, 1666 to 1678 inclusive. In Oct. 1670 the General Assembly granted him 100 acres in recognition of his service in the Pequot War. The length of his Deputy service qualifies him as an ancestor for the Society of Colonial Dames of America, and the Pequot War service for the Society of Colonial Wars. William Pratt received a lot in Soldier's Field, Hartford, as one of the band that went from Hartford to fight the Pequots; he sold it in 1645 and removed to Saybrook, probably about that time. He married, by 1641, Elizabeth Clark, daughter of 'Elder' John Clark, who later was a Patentee of Connecticut Colony named in the Royal Charter of 1662. This is proved by John Clark's will. William became possessed of considerable land, more than 250 acres being found on record which were acquired by grant or purchase. He was also a legatee for a large tract of land in the will of the Indian Attawanhood who was known to the English as Joshua Uncas.

    William married Elizabeth Clark before 1641 in Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut. Elizabeth (daughter of John Clark) was born about 1622; died before 2 Apr 1695. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 11.  Elizabeth Clark was born about 1622 (daughter of John Clark); died before 2 Apr 1695.
    Children:
    1. 5. Lydia Pratt
    2. Elizabeth Pratt was born on 1 Feb 1641 in Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut; died in 1730 in Norwich, New London, Connecticut.
    3. Ensign John Pratt was born on 20 Feb 1644; died before 13 Jan 1726.