Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Eleanor de Bohun

Female - Aft 1278


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Eleanor de Bohun (daughter of Humphrey de Bohun and Maud of Avenbury); died after 10 Jun 1278.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Aft 1276

    Notes:

    "Sometime after [10 Jun 1278], members of Eleanor's household petitioned the king, stating that she was mad and an imbecile, and requested a suitable wardship for her." [Royal Ancestry]

    Peter Stewart, 2 Dec 2020, post to soc.genealogy.medieval:

    There is no question that [Humphrey de Bohun, d. 1265, and his wife Eleanor de Briouze] did have a daughter named Eleanor, but she was the second wife of Robert de Ferrers, 6th earl of Derby, from June 1269 whereas the other Eleanor de Bohun, wife of John de Verdon, was widowed in 1274. The latter couple had a son named Humphrey—presumably after her father—born on 4 June 1267, and she had the Verdon and Bohun bearings on her seal. The Eleanor married to Robert de Ferrers was described as sister to Humphrey de Bohun, 3rd earl of Hereford (son of Humphrey who died in 1265 by Eleanor de Braiose) in the close roll for 1290 (Edward I, vol 3 p. 119: "Humphrey de Bohun, earl of Hereford, and Eleanor de Ferrariis, his sister, acknowledge that they owe to Robert de Tibotot and Matthew de Columbariis, the king's butler, 200l.; to be levied, in default of payment, of their lands and chattels in cos. Hereford and Essex"). Two witnesses at the IPM of this Eleanor's son John, 1st lord Ferrers of Chartley, quoted in CP vol. 5 pp. 305-306 note (d), placed her as the granddaughter of Humphrey de Bohun who was clearly the 2nd earl of Hereford and 7th of Essex.

    The most likely answer seems to me that John de Verdon's wife Eleanor de Bohun was a paternal half-sister of Humphrey the husband of Eleanor de Braiose, i.e. a daughter of the 2nd earl of Herford by his second wife, Maud de Avenbury. This would account for her evident family connection as well as the chronology placing her apparently around 20 years younger than the daughters of the 2nd earl by his first wife, Maud de Lusignan.

    The double Verdon-Bohun marriages posited by [Mark S. Hagger, The Fortunes of a Norman Family, The Verduns in England, Ireland, and Wales, 1066-1316], including his Matilda who was actually named Margery or Margaret to John's son Theobald I, are somewhat downscale socio-politically from the Ferrers marriage of the 3rd earl's sister. Maybe Margery was also a near-contemporary half-blood aunt of the 3rd earl, another daughter of the 2nd earl by Maud de Avenbury. At any rate Hagger's placing her as a sister of the third earl would entail a second-cousin marriage between her son Theobald II de Verdon and Maud de Mortimer, both in that case great-grandchildren of William de Braiose and Eve Marshal.

    Eleanor married John de Verdun before 1267. John (son of Theobald le Boteler and Rohese de Verdun) was born about 1226 in of Alton, Staffordshire, England; died before 17 Oct 1274. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. Maud de Verdun was born in in of Alton Castle, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England; died after 1293.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Humphrey de Bohun was born after 28 Apr 1199 (son of Henry de Bohun and Maud de Mandeville); died on 24 Sep 1275; was buried in Llanthony Priory, outside Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Abt 1200

    Notes:

    Earl of Hereford and, from 27 Aug 1236, Earl of Essex.

    Hereditary Constable of England; Constable of the Exchequer 1228; Constable of Dover Castle and Warden of the Cinque Ports 1239-41; Sheriff of Kent 1239-41; Warden of the Marches of Wales 1245; a crusader in 1250; Privy Councillor 1258; Justice of Assize at Cardiff 1261; Chief Captain of the Army in Wales 1263; Constable of Haye, Huntingdon, and Tregruk Castles.

    "After his father's death William Brewer had custody of Caldicot [Monmouth] and of Walton in Surrey, but Humphrey had livery of Caldicot Castle and all lands held in chief the next year, the King having taken his homage. He joined the Earl of Cornwall in his quarrel with the King in 1227. In 1228/9 he had an acquittance for 15 1/5 fees of the moiety of the fees of Trowbridge. At the coronation of Queen Eleanor in 1236 he was Marshal of the Household. He had livery of his mother's lands 9 Sep. 1236. In 1237 he went on a pilgrimage to Santiago. He was appointed constable of Dover Castle 27 Feb. 1238/9, which he surrendered 4 Nov. 1241, and during these years was sheriff of Kent. He stood sponsor at the baptism of Edward I in 1239. In 1242 he was in the expedition to France, but returned because of the King's foreign favourites. In 1244 the cause of the Welsh rising is assigned to his having kept in his hand the inheritance of the wife of David, s. of Llewelyn, Prince of Wales. He joined in the remonstrance to the Pope in 1246, and was present at the Great Council of 1248. In 1250 he was among those who took the Cross. On 13 Sep. 1251 he had licence to make his will. He was present at the sentence of excommunication against the transgressors of the charters (1253). He had a protection 15 Nov. 1253 for as long as the King remained in Gascony, and was with him there in 1254, but withdrew (having the King's permission) after failing to obtain satisfaction in a matter concerning his jurisdiction as constable. On 18 Dec. 1253 he and his eld. s. Humphrey had licence to hunt hare, fox, cat and other wild beasts in the forests of Bradon and Savernake, Wilts. In 1257 he was appointed to keep the marches between Montgomery and the land of the Earl of G1oucester, and had a protection 22 Oct. on staying in Wales in the service of Prince Edward. In 1258 he was one of the 24 councillors to draw up the Provisions of Oxford, being chosen among the Barons' twelve, and was thereafter one of the fifteen chosen to advise the King on all points; he was also one of the twelve elected by the Barons to represent the community in three annual parliaments, and was one of the 24 who were concerned in treating of aids. In 1259 he was the King's representative (with the Count of Aumale) for the preservation of peace between France and England; was concerned with Llywellyn ap Gruffydd in the matter of the truce; and was one of the commissioners who ratified the treaty between France and England in July. On 10 Aug. 1260 he was sent to treat for peace with Llywellyn, and on 25 Aug. 1262 was one of the commissioners to meet Llywellyn's commissioners at the Ford of Montgomery. He had a grant of the custody of the lands of the late Earl of Gloucester 18 July 1262. In the struggle of 1263/4 he took the side of the King; was one of the keepers of the City of London, 9 Oct. 1265, and one of the plenipotentiaries for the Dictum of Kenilworth." [Complete Peerage 6:459]

    Humphrey married Maud of Avenbury. Maud died on 8 Oct 1273 in Sorges, Gascony, France; was buried after 8 Oct 1273 in Sorges, Gascony, France. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Maud of Avenbury died on 8 Oct 1273 in Sorges, Gascony, France; was buried after 8 Oct 1273 in Sorges, Gascony, France.

    Other Events:

    • Buried: 1290, Llanthony Priory, outside Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England

    Notes:

    Her parentage is not established. Douglas Richardson calls her "presumably" a sister of Walter, Osbert, and Master Giles de Avenbury. Complete Peerage notes that "[a] Walter de Avenbury paid 4,000 marks in 1250 for the custody of the land and heir of Richard de Anesy, and in 1273 a Walter de Avenbury was late collector of the 20th in Hereford."

    Children:
    1. 1. Eleanor de Bohun died after 10 Jun 1278.
    2. Margery de Bohun died between 1280 and 1304.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Henry de Bohun was born about 1175 in of Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England (son of Humphrey de Bohun and Margaret of Huntingdon); died on 1 Jun 1220 in Palestine; was buried in Llanthony Priory, outside Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: 1176
    • Alternate birth: Abt 1176, of Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England

    Notes:

    Earl of Hereford. Hereditary Constable of England. Sheriff of Kent, 1200.

    Magna Carta surety; as such, excommunicated by Innocent III 16 Dec 1215. Fought for Louis of France at the battle of Lincoln, where he was taken prisoner 20 May 1217, subsequently released and his forfeited lands restored. Left on the Fifth Crusade 1219; died in Palestine the following year.

    Henry married Maud de Mandeville. Maud (daughter of Geoffrey fitz Peter and Beatrice de Say) died on 27 Aug 1236. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  Maud de Mandeville (daughter of Geoffrey fitz Peter and Beatrice de Say); died on 27 Aug 1236.

    Notes:

    Countess of Hereford and Essex. Also caled Maud fitz Geoffrey. But despite being the daughter of two people not named "Mandeville," she was primarily known as Maud de Mandeville. See below.

    Douglas Richardson, 29 Oct 2011, post to soc.genealogy.medieval:

    Henry de Bohun's wife was known as Maud de Mandeville.

    For instances of Maud, Countess of Essex and Hereford, being styled Maud de Mandeville in contemporary records, see Cal. Charters Rolls 1 (1903): 196; Davis, Rotuli Hugonis de Welles Episcopi Lincolniensis 1209 - 1235 3 (Lincoln Rec. Soc. 9) (1914): 32; Hassall, Cartulary of St. Mary Clekenwell (Camden 3rd Ser. 71) (1949): 126; Duchy of Lancaster, Descriptive List (with Index) of Cartæ Miscellaneæ, Lists and Indexes, Supplementary Series, No. V, vol. 3 (1964): 85; Mason, Beauchamp Cartulary Charters (Pipe Roll Soc. n.s. 43) (1980): 187 - 188.

    Children:
    1. 2. Humphrey de Bohun was born after 28 Apr 1199; died on 24 Sep 1275; was buried in Llanthony Priory, outside Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Humphrey de Bohun was born before 1144 in of Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England (son of Humphrey de Bohun and Margaret of Hereford); died in 1181; was buried in Llanthony Priory, outside Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 1182

    Notes:

    Earl of Hereford. Hereditary Constable of England.

    "Humphrey (III) de Bohun [...] distinguished himself on the king's side in the war of 1173–4. He was in the royal army at Breteuil in August 1173, and with the justiciar Richard de Lucy later sacked Berwick and led troops into Lothian against William the Lion, king of Scots, before having to return south to deal with rebellion in England. In October 1173 he featured prominently in the defeat and capture of the earl of Leicester and others at Fornham near Bury St Edmunds. He witnessed the treaty of Falaise between Henry II and the king of Scots at the close of 1174. Through his marriage, which took place between February 1171 and Easter 1175, to Margaret (d. 1201), daughter of Henry of Scotland, earl of Northumberland (d. 1152), and widow of Conan (IV), duke of Brittany (d. 1171), he became brother-in-law to the king of Scots. He died while a member of the army led into France towards the end of 1181 by Henry II's sons to assist Philippe II against the count of Flanders, and was buried at Llanthony (Secunda) Priory, Gloucestershire." [Oxford Dictionary of National Biography]

    Humphrey married Margaret of Huntingdon between 29 Sep 1172 and 1 Jan 1175. Margaret (daughter of Henry of Scotland and Ada de Warenne) was born about 1145; died in 1201; was buried in Sawtrey Abbey, Huntingdonshire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  Margaret of Huntingdon was born about 1145 (daughter of Henry of Scotland and Ada de Warenne); died in 1201; was buried in Sawtrey Abbey, Huntingdonshire, England.

    Notes:

    Also Margery, Marjory, Margaret of Scotland.

    "Following the Battle of Alnwick in July 1174 (in which her brother William the Lion, King of Scots was captured by the English), Margaret was imprisoned at Rochester Castle and afterwards removed to Rouen. On her release, Margaret married (2nd) in 1175 HUMPHREY DE BOHUN." [Royal Ancestry]

    Children:
    1. 4. Henry de Bohun was born about 1175 in of Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England; died on 1 Jun 1220 in Palestine; was buried in Llanthony Priory, outside Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.

  3. 10.  Geoffrey fitz Peter was born in in of Pleshy, Essex, England (son of Peter de Ludgershall and Maud); died on 14 Oct 1213; was buried in Shouldham Priory, Norfolk, England.

    Notes:

    Earl of Essex. Chief Justiciar of England from 1198 to his death.

    Chief Forester; Sheriff of Northamptonshire 1184-89, 1191-94; Sheriff of Essex and Hertfordshire 1190-93; Constable of Hertford Castle; Sheriff of Staffordshire 1198; Sheriff of Yorkshire 1198-1200, 1202-4; Sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire 1199-1204; Sheriff of Westmorland 1199-1200; Sheriff of Hampshire 1201-4; Sheriff of Shropshire 1201-4.

    He was raised in the remarkable household of his uncle, the justiciar of England Ranulph de Glanville, along with, among others, the future king John, and the Walter brothers, nephews of Glanville's wife Bertha de Valognes. Theobald Walter would become chief butler of England and Ireland and the founder of enduring lordships in Munster and Leinster. Hubert Walter would become archbishop of Canterbury, Geoffrey's predecessor as justiciar of England, and then -- after Geoffrey succeeded him as justiciar -- Chancellor of England.

    Geoffrey married Beatrice de Say before 25 Jan 1185. Beatrice (daughter of William de Say) died before 19 Apr 1197. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 11.  Beatrice de Say (daughter of William de Say); died before 19 Apr 1197.

    Notes:

    "[B]uried in Chicksand Priory, but was transferred thence to Shouldham Priory." [Complete Peerage]

    Children:
    1. 5. Maud de Mandeville died on 27 Aug 1236.