Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Elizabeth de Segrave

Female 1338 - 1368  (25 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Elizabeth de Segrave was born on 25 Oct 1338 in Croxton Abbey, Melton Mobray, Leicestershire, England (daughter of John de Segrave and Margaret Marshal); died between 1364 and 1368.

    Other Events:

    • Baptised: 25 Oct 1338, Croxton Abbey, Melton Mobray, Leicestershire, England
    • Alternate death: Bef 1368
    • Alternate death: 21 Sep 1368
    • Alternate death: 9 Oct 1368
    • Alternate death: Abt 1375

    Notes:

    Suo jure Lady Segrave.

    Elizabeth married John Mowbray after 25 Mar 1349. John (son of John de Mowbray and Joan of Lancaster) was born on 25 Jun 1340 in Epworth, Lincolnshire, England; died on 17 Jun 1368 in Thrace, near Constantinople; was buried in Church and Convent of St. Mary Draperis of Pera, Constantinople. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Notes:

    Married by papal dispensation, being third cousins, both descended from Henry III and Eleanor of Provence.

    Children:
    1. Joan Mowbray died after 1407.
    2. Eleanor Mowbray was born before 1361.
    3. Thomas Mowbray was born on 22 Mar 1367; died on 22 Sep 1399 in Venice, Veneto, Italy; was buried in Venice, Veneto, Italy.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  John de Segrave was born on 4 May 1315 (son of Stephen de Segrave and Alice de Arundel); died on 20 Mar 1353; was buried in Chacombe Priory, Northamptonshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: of Segrave, Leicestershire, England
    • Alternate death: 1 Apr 1353, Bretby, Repton, Derbyshire, England

    John married Margaret Marshal in 1334. Margaret (daughter of Thomas of Brotherton and Alice de Hales) was born about 1322; died on 24 Mar 1399; was buried in Christ Church Greyfriars, Newgate, London, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Margaret Marshal was born about 1322 (daughter of Thomas of Brotherton and Alice de Hales); died on 24 Mar 1399; was buried in Christ Church Greyfriars, Newgate, London, England.

    Other Events:

    • Buried: Charterhouse, Smithfield, London, England
    • Alternate death: 24 Mar 1400

    Notes:

    Also called Margaret of Norfolk. She was Countess of Norfolk by right. In 1338 she succeeded to the earldom of Norfolk as well, acquiring, by right of that title, the office of Earl Marshal of England. On 29 Sep 1397 she was created Duchess of Norfolk for life.

    Sometimes called "Lady Manny", presumably after her second husband. Also sometimes (albeit inaccurately) called "Margaret Plantagenet."

    Children:
    1. 1. Elizabeth de Segrave was born on 25 Oct 1338 in Croxton Abbey, Melton Mobray, Leicestershire, England; died between 1364 and 1368.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Stephen de Segrave was born about 1285 in of West Hatch, Wiltshire, England (son of John de Segrave and Christian de Plessets); died before 12 Dec 1325 in Aquitaine, France; was buried in Chaucombe Priory, Chaucombe, Northamptonshire, England.

    Notes:

    Constable of the Tower of London.

    Stephen married Alice de Arundel before 27 Jan 1314. Alice (daughter of Richard Fitz Alan and Alice di Saluzzo) died after 12 Dec 1325. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  Alice de Arundel (daughter of Richard Fitz Alan and Alice di Saluzzo); died after 12 Dec 1325.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Aft 31 Mar 1342

    Children:
    1. 2. John de Segrave was born on 4 May 1315; died on 20 Mar 1353; was buried in Chacombe Priory, Northamptonshire, England.

  3. 6.  Thomas of Brotherton was born on 1 Jun 1300 in of Brotherton, Yorkshire, England (son of Edward I, King of England and Marguerite of France, Queen Consort of England); died after 4 Aug 1338; was buried in Abbey of Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 23 Aug 1338, Redenhall with Harleston, Norfolk, England

    Notes:

    Earl of Norfolk. Marshal of England. Warden of St. John's Town of Perth.

    "In 1310 Edward II assigned to his brothers Thomas and Edmund jointly the estates of Roger Bigod, late Earl of Norfolk; and on 16 Dec. 1312 Thomas was cr. Earl of Norfolk, and sum. to Parl. as such 8 Jan 1312/3. On 10 Feb. 1315/6 he was cr. Marshal of England." [Complete Peerage]

    "Brotherton, Yorkshire, a small village twenty-two miles outside of the city of York, was part of the honour of Pontefract. Prior to 1300, it had never been a royal residence, or the site of a royal birth, nor has it been one since. It was not even expected to have been one in 1300. Edward I, his new young wife Margaret, who turned twenty-one that year and was pregnant with their first child, and the royal household, set out north from St Albans on 15 April 1300. The army had been summoned to Carlisle for mid-summer, for a new Scottish campaign. Queen Margaret parted company with the main household at Stamford on 5 May, and continued her own journey northward. Preparations had been made for her to use Cawood Castle, a residence of the Archbishop of York, for her confinement. She stopped in the village of Brotherton to hunt late that month, and went into labour, early and unexpectedly. Margaret had married Edward I on 10 September 1299 and, if conception occurred immediately, she was in her 38th week, but as she was apparently hunting and had not yet reached Cawood, she may have been a week or two earlier in her pregnancy. The labour was difficult, and Margaret reportedly called on St Thomas of Canterbury for assistance. The baby was delivered on 1 June, and named for the saint. Edward I rushed over to the village as soon as he was given the news, and stayed there until 9 June (Waugh, 2004; Johnstone, 1946). Thomas was likely baptised in Brotherton's church of St Edward the Confessor, which lay very close to the original manor house." ["Love Matches and Contracted Misery: Thomas of Brotherton and His Daughters (Part 1)," by Brad Verity. Foundations, journal of the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, volume 2, number 2, July 2006.]

    "Many sources relay a date of September 1338, for Thomas's death, using testimony from the Proof of Age of his granddaughter Elizabeth de Segrave as a source (see CIPM 1352-1361, p.115). But Watson's date of 23 August appears to be correct, for the king ordered the seizure of Thomas's goods and chattels on 28 August (see Archer, 1987, p.205 n.9)." ["Love Matches and Contracted Misery: Thomas of Brotherton and His Daughters (Part 1)," by Brad Verity. Foundations, journal of the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, volume 2, number 2, July 2006.] ?

    Thomas married Alice de Hales after Jun 1321. Alice (daughter of Roger de Hales and Alice) was born after 1303 in Norfolk, England; died before 12 Oct 1330. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 7.  Alice de Hales was born after 1303 in Norfolk, England (daughter of Roger de Hales and Alice); died before 12 Oct 1330.
    Children:
    1. 3. Margaret Marshal was born about 1322; died on 24 Mar 1399; was buried in Christ Church Greyfriars, Newgate, London, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  John de Segrave was born in in of Chacombe, Northamptonshire, England (son of Nicholas de Segrave and Maud de Lucy); died before 4 Oct 1325 in Aquitaine, France; was buried in Chaucombe Priory, Chaucombe, Northamptonshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Abt 1256, of Segrave, Leicestershire, England

    Notes:

    Justice of the Forest beyond Trent; King's Lieutenant (or Keeper) of Scotland.

    "A knight in Aug 1282; served in Wales, 1285, in Ireland, 1287, and in Scotland in 1291 and 1297-1322. He was a principal commander at the victorious battle of Falkirk, 22 July 1298; was at the siege of Caerlaverock, July 1300, being then a knight banneret, and was captured by the Scots following the English defeat at Bannockburn, 24 June 1314 and released following a year of captivity. Appointed Warden of Scotland, 10 Mar 1309 and again, 10 Apr 1310." [The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, citation details below.]

    John married Christian de Plessets in 1270. Christian (daughter of Hugh de Plessets) died after 8 May 1331. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  Christian de Plessets (daughter of Hugh de Plessets); died after 8 May 1331.

    Notes:

    Also called de Plescy, de Plessy, de Plessis.

    Children:
    1. (Unknown) de Segrave died before 1316.
    2. Christian de Segrave died after 1332.
    3. 4. Stephen de Segrave was born about 1285 in of West Hatch, Wiltshire, England; died before 12 Dec 1325 in Aquitaine, France; was buried in Chaucombe Priory, Chaucombe, Northamptonshire, England.

  3. 10.  Richard Fitz Alan was born on 3 Feb 1267 in of Arundel, Sussex, England (son of John Fitz Alan and Isabella de Mortimer); died on 9 Mar 1302; was buried in Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

    Notes:

    Also called Richard de Arundel. Earl of Arundel.

    From Complete Peerage, 1:240-41:

    Richard fitz Alan, feudal Lord of Clun and Oswestry and [according to the admission of 1443], Earl of Arundel, only son and heir, born 3 February 1266/7, and was only 5 years old at his father's death. He had seizin of his lands 8 December 1287. According to Glover he was created Earl of Sussex (a) in 1289, when he was knighted and "received the sword of the county of Sussex" from Edward I "ut vocatur Comes;", but it seems more probable that this creation was as Earl of Arundel (b). At all events no more is heard of the former title (Sussex) as connected with this family, but only of the title of Arundel. On 12 February 1290/1 there is a grant to him as Richard Arundel, Earl of Arundel. In October 1292 he was summoned by a writ directed to the Earl of Arundel, and was summoned to Parliament 24 June 1295, by a writ directed Ricardo filio Alani Comiti Arundell, ranking him as junior to all the other Earls. He fought in the Welsh wars 1288, in Gascony 1295-7, and in the Scottish wars 1298-1300, being present at the siege of Carlaverock in 1300. He signed the Barons' letter to the Pope, 12 February 1300/1.

    (a) "The Earldom of Sussex must at this period have been a subject of contention between the De Warrens and Fitz Alans, for John de Warren, Earl of Surrey, was receiving, at the very time that this investiture occurred, writs directed to him as Earl of Sussex. John de Warren was perhaps the greatest noble of the time in which he lived, and his power and influence may have operated to induce Fitz Alan to abandon his claim upon the Earldom of Sussex and to adopt that [i.e. the Earldom of Arundel] by which his descendants have ever since been known." (Courthope, p. 29).

    (b) It is worthy of remark, in connection with the very doubtful right, either of his father or grandfather, to the Earldom of Arundel, that it was not till 1282, viz. sometime after their death and during this Earl's minority, that Isabel, Countess of Arundel, widow of Hugh (d'Aubigny), died. It would almost appear (possibly owing to the largess of her dower) that the Earldom was not dealt with during her lifetime. A somewhat parallel case occurs, later on, in the same family, when Richard, Earl of Arundel, who, in 1347, had suc. his maternal uncle the Earl of Surrey, did not assume the Earldom of Surrey till the death of Joan, widow of the afsd. Earl, in 1361.

    Richard married Alice di Saluzzo in Nov 1282. Alice (daughter of Tomasso di Saluzzo and Aluigia del Vasto) was born in in of Saluzzo, Cuneo, Piedmont, Italy; died on 25 Sep 1292; was buried in Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 11.  Alice di Saluzzo was born in in of Saluzzo, Cuneo, Piedmont, Italy (daughter of Tomasso di Saluzzo and Aluigia del Vasto); died on 25 Sep 1292; was buried in Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

    Notes:

    Also called Alasia di Saluzzo; Alasia del Vasto di Saluzzo.

    "Along with her aunt Alasia de Saluzzo who married Edmund de Lacy, 2nd earl of Lincoln, in 1247, Alasia was one of the first Italian women to marry into an English noble family. Her marriage had been arranged by the late King Henry III's widowed queen consort Eleanor de Provence." [Leo van de Pas]

    CP has her buried at Todingham Priory, but Chris Phillips's compilation of corrections to CP includes Douglas Richardson's note in Jan 2002 that "the bodies of both Richard and Alesia were at Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, by 1341, when provision was made for 12 candles to burn in the church of Haughmond around their tombs."

    Children:
    1. 5. Alice de Arundel died after 12 Dec 1325.
    2. Margaret de Arundel died before 1354.
    3. Eleanor de Arundel was born about 1284 in Arundel, Sussex, England; died in 1328; was buried in Beverley, Yorkshire, England.
    4. Edmund Fitz Alan was born on 1 May 1285 in Marlborough Castle, Wiltshire, Engand; died on 17 Nov 1326 in Hereford, Herefordshire, England; was buried in Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

  5. 12.  Edward I, King of England was born on 17 Jun 1239 in Westminster Palace, Westminster, Middlesex, England (son of Henry III, King of England and Eleanor of Provence, Queen Consort of England); died on 7 Jul 1307 in Burgh-by-Sands, Carlisle, Cumberland, England; was buried in Westminster Abbey, Westminster, Middlesex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: 18 Jun 1239, Westminster Palace, Westminster, Middlesex, England
    • Baptised: 21 Jun 1239
    • Alternate death: 8 Jul 1307, Burgh-by-Sands, Carlisle, Cumberland, England

    Notes:

    Edward Longshanks, Hammer of the Scots, conqueror of Wales. Although he is acclaimed for his many administrative accomplishments and for establishing Parliament as a permanent institution, he also expelled the Jews from England; significant numbers of them returned only 350 years later. He was tall (6' 4"), personally intimidating, and rigid in personal morality, in marked contrast to most earlier post-Conquest English rulers.

    Edward married Marguerite of France, Queen Consort of England on 8 Sep 1299 in Canterbury, Kent, England. Marguerite (daughter of Philippe III, King of France and Marie of Brabant, Queen Consort of France) was born about 1275; died on 14 Feb 1318 in Marlborough, Wiltshire, England; was buried in Christ Church Greyfriars, Newgate, London, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  6. 13.  Marguerite of France, Queen Consort of England was born about 1275 (daughter of Philippe III, King of France and Marie of Brabant, Queen Consort of France); died on 14 Feb 1318 in Marlborough, Wiltshire, England; was buried in Christ Church Greyfriars, Newgate, London, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Abt 1282

    Children:
    1. 6. Thomas of Brotherton was born on 1 Jun 1300 in of Brotherton, Yorkshire, England; died after 4 Aug 1338; was buried in Abbey of Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, England.
    2. Edmund of Woodstock was born on 5 Aug 1301 in Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England; died on 19 Mar 1330 in Winchester, Hampshire, England; was buried in Winchester, Hampshire, England.

  7. 14.  Roger de Hales was born about 1274; died in 1313.

    Notes:

    Coroner of Norfolk from 1303 until his death.

    "Two 16th-century pedigrees in the British Museum state that Roger was the son of one Ranulph de Halys by Demeta le Clauer, of Starston, Norfolk, and that his wife was Jane, daughter and heir of ---- Skogan. None of this information has been verified by 13th or 14th century sources. How exactly Sir Roger fits into the family of Hales that held manors in Norfolk is uncertain. What can be known is that he held two of the Loddon manors, Loddon Hall and Hales Hall, about 12 miles southeast of Norwich, as well as manors in Roughton and Metton, about 15 miles north of Norwich. There were other lands the family held, for example in Wacton and Forncett, several miles west of the Loddon manors, and all were held of the earl of Norfolk. The statement that Sir Roger de Hales was 'of Harwich,' which originated in Ralph Brooke's Catalogue of Nobility (1619) and is repeated in several genealogies, was perhaps a mistake for Norwich, the closest town to the majority of the Hales manors. It is believed Sir Roger was related to Walter de Suffield (d. 1257), bishop of Norwich." ["Love Matches and Contracted Misery: Thomas of Brotherton and His Daughters (Part 1)," by Brad Verity. Foundations, journal of the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, volume 2, number 2, July 2006.]

    Roger married Alice. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  8. 15.  Alice

    Notes:

    Possibly from a family named Skogan. See "Love Matches and Contracted Misery", citation details below.

    Children:
    1. 7. Alice de Hales was born after 1303 in Norfolk, England; died before 12 Oct 1330.