Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Eirene of Hungary

Female Abt 1078 - 1134  (~ 56 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Eirene of Hungary was born about 1078 (daughter of St. Lászlo I, King of Hungary and Adela von Rheinfelden); died on 13 Aug 1134.

    Notes:

    Also called Piroska of Hungary.

    Eirene married Ioannes II Komnenos Doukas, Emperor of Byzantium in 1104. Ioannes (son of Alexios I Komnenos, Emperor of Byzantium and Irene Doukaina) was born on 13 Sep 1087; died on 8 Apr 1143 in Mount Tarsus, Cilicia, Anatolia. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. Andronikos Komnenos was born about 1108; died in 1142.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  St. Lászlo I, King of Hungary was born on 27 Jun 1040 (son of Béla I, King of Hungary and Adelaide of Poland); died on 29 Jul 1095.

    Lászlo married Adela von Rheinfelden in 1077. Adela (daughter of Rudolf von Rheinfelden and Adelheid of Savoy) died in 1079. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Adela von Rheinfelden (daughter of Rudolf von Rheinfelden and Adelheid of Savoy); died in 1079.
    Children:
    1. 1. Eirene of Hungary was born about 1078; died on 13 Aug 1134.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Béla I, King of Hungary was born between 1015 and 1020 (son of Vazul of Hungary and (Unknown lady of the Tátony clan)); died on 11 Sep 1063 in Kinizsa Creek, Hungary.

    Notes:

    From Leo van de Pas:

    Béla was born about 1016, the third son of Vazul (Basil) 'the Blind' of Hungary, and younger brother of András I, who was crowned king after the Vatha pagan rising.

    In 1048 András conferred on Béla one third of Hungary as appanage ('Tercia pars Regni'), making him Duke of the Nitrian Frontier duchy, with Nitra its capital, and which included the southern Slovakian Nitrian principality and the north-eastern historic Hungarian Bihar region (not identical to the later Bihar).

    The two brothers shared power without incident until 1053, when András fathered a son Salomon. Thereafter András became determined to secure the throne for his son and to displace his brother. András therefore had Salomon, Béla's nephew, crowned future king in 1057. According to legend, András placed before Béla a crown and a sword, representing royal and ducal power, respectively, and asked Béla to take his choice. Knowing that choosing the crown would mean his life, Béla instead selected the sword. In 1059 Béla fled to Poland where he was received by his brother-in-law Kazimierz I Karol, king of Poland, brother of Béla's wife Richeza. Béla and Richeza had eight children, of whom five would have progeny, and two, Geisa I and Lászlo I, would be kings of Hungary.

    In 1060 Béla returned to Hungary and defeated András I to become the new king. After András' death, Béla was crowned king on 6 December 1060. During his brief reign he concerned himself with crushing pagan revolts in his kingdom. In 1063 Béla died in an accident when his throne's canopy collapsed. After his death the Holy Roman Emperor Heinrich IV installed András I's son Salomon as the new king, and Belá's sons had to flee to Poland again.

    Béla married Adelaide of Poland between 1039 and 1043. Adelaide (daughter of Mieszko II Lambert, King Of Poland and Richeza of Lotharingia) was born on 22 Sep 1013; died after 1051. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  Adelaide of Poland was born on 22 Sep 1013 (daughter of Mieszko II Lambert, King Of Poland and Richeza of Lotharingia); died after 1051.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 21 May 1075

    Notes:

    Traditionally called Richeza, but contemporary sources suggest that her actual name was a form of Adelaide.

    There appears to be uncertainty as to whether she was actually a daughter of Mieszko II, King of Poland, and Richeza of Lotharingia.

    Children:
    1. Geisa I, King of Hungary died on 24 Apr 1077.
    2. 2. St. Lászlo I, King of Hungary was born on 27 Jun 1040; died on 29 Jul 1095.
    3. Sophia of Hungary was born about 1050; died on 18 Jun 1095.

  3. 6.  Rudolf von Rheinfelden was born about 1025 (son of Kuno); died on 15 Oct 1080 in Merseburg, Saxony.

    Notes:

    Duke of Swabia. Killed in battle.

    Rudolf married Adelheid of Savoy in 1067. Adelheid (daughter of Otto I of Savoy and Adelaide of Susa) was born about 1052; died in 1079. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 7.  Adelheid of Savoy was born about 1052 (daughter of Otto I of Savoy and Adelaide of Susa); died in 1079.

    Notes:

    Duchess of Swabia.

    Children:
    1. 3. Adela von Rheinfelden died in 1079.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Vazul of Hungary was born about 990 (son of Mihály of Hungary and Adelajda of Poland); died in 1037.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Aft 1038

    Notes:

    "The Blind." Also called Vászoly.

    "[T]he only certain information of his life [is] that he was kept in captivity and blinded in the fortress of Nyitra (Nitra, Slovakia) in the last years of the reign of his cousin, King Stephen I of Hungary. Modern historians, including György Györffy, do not exclude that he had earlier been Duke of Nyitra. He is the forefather of nearly all Kings of Hungary who reigned after 1046." [Wikipedia]

    Vazul married (Unknown lady of the Tátony clan). [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  (Unknown lady of the Tátony clan)

    Notes:

    Called on Leo van de Pas's site "Katun Comitopuli or Katalin of Bulgaria."

    Children:
    1. András I, King of Hungary died before 6 Dec 1060 in Zirc, Hungary.
    2. 4. Béla I, King of Hungary was born between 1015 and 1020; died on 11 Sep 1063 in Kinizsa Creek, Hungary.

  3. 10.  Mieszko II Lambert, King Of Poland (son of Boleslaw I Chrobry, King of Poland and Emnilda of Lusatia); died in May 1034.

    Mieszko married Richeza of Lotharingia in 1013. Richeza (daughter of Ezzo of Lotharingia and Mathilde von Sachsen) was born about 998; died on 21 Mar 1063 in Saalfield, Thuringia, Germany. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 11.  Richeza of Lotharingia was born about 998 (daughter of Ezzo of Lotharingia and Mathilde von Sachsen); died on 21 Mar 1063 in Saalfield, Thuringia, Germany.
    Children:
    1. 5. Adelaide of Poland was born on 22 Sep 1013; died after 1051.
    2. Casimir I was born on 25 Jul 1016 in Krakow, Malowpolskie, Poland; died on 28 Nov 1058 in Poznan, Wielkopolskie, Poland.
    3. Gertrude-Olisava of Poland was born about 1020 in Krakow, Malowpolskie, Poland; died on 4 Jan 1107.

  5. 12.  Kuno died in 1026.

    Notes:

    Count of Rheinfelden.

    Children:
    1. 6. Rudolf von Rheinfelden was born about 1025; died on 15 Oct 1080 in Merseburg, Saxony.

  6. 14.  Otto I of Savoy (son of Humbert I of Savoy and Ancilla); died between 19 Jan 1057 and 1060.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 1060

    Notes:

    Count of Maurienne (Savoy) and Chablis. Margrave of Susa. Margrave of Turin.

    Otto married Adelaide of Susa about 1046. Adelaide (daughter of Olderich II Manfredo and Berta of Este) was born about 1015; died on 27 Dec 1091 in Canischio, Turino, Piedmont, Italy. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  7. 15.  Adelaide of Susa was born about 1015 (daughter of Olderich II Manfredo and Berta of Este); died on 27 Dec 1091 in Canischio, Turino, Piedmont, Italy.

    Notes:

    Also called Alix.

    Marchioness (Duchess) of Turin. Kick-ass eleventh-century woman who took no crap from anybody, evidently.

    From Wikipedia:

    Since the margravial title primarily had a military purpose at the time, it was thus was not considered suitable for a woman. Emperor Conrad II therefore arranged a marriage between Adelaide and his stepson, Herman IV, in January 1037. Herman was then invested as margrave of Turin. Herman died of the plague while fighting for Conrad II at Naples in July 1038.

    Adelaide remarried in order to secure her vast march. Probably in 1041, and certainly before 19 January 1042, Adelaide married Henry, Marquess of Montferrat. Henry died c. 1045 and left Adelaide a widow for the second time. Immediately, a third marriage was undertaken, this time to Otto of Savoy (1046). With Otto she had three sons, Peter I, Amadeus II, and Otto. The couple also had two daughters, Bertha, who married Henry IV of Germany, and Adelaide, who married Rudolf of Rheinfelden (who later opposed Henry as King of Germany). [...]

    In 1070 Adelaide captured and burned the city of Asti, which had rebelled against her.

    In 1069 Henry IV tried to repudiate Adelaide's daughter, Bertha, which caused Adelaide's relationship with the imperial family to cool. However, through the intervention of Bertha, Henry received Adelaide's support when he came to Italy to submit to Pope Gregory VII and Matilda of Tuscany at Canossa. In return for allowing him to travel through her lands, Henry gave Bugey to Adelaide. Adelaide and her son Amadeus then accompanied Henry IV and Bertha to Canossa, where Adelaide acted as an oath-helper, alongside Matilda and Albert Azzo II, Margrave of Milan, among others. Bishop Benzo of Alba sent several letters to Adelaide between 1080 and 1082, encouraging her to support Henry IV in the Italian wars which formed part of the Investiture Controversy. Adelaide's dealings with Henry IV became closer after this. She offered to mediate between him and Matilda and Tuscany, and may even have joined him on campaign.

    Adelaide made many donations to monasteries in the march of Turin. In 1064 she founded the monastery of Santa Maria at Pinerolo.

    Adelaide received letters from many of the leading churchmen of the day, including Pope Alexander II, Peter Damian, and Pope Gregory VII. These letters indicate that Adelaide sometimes supported Gregorian reform, but that at other times she did not. Peter Damian (writing in 1064) and Gregory VII (writing in 1073), relied upon Adelaide to enforce clerical celibacy and protect the monasteries of Fruttuaria and San Michele della Chiusa. By contrast, Alexander II (writing c. 1066/7) reproached Adelaide for her dealings with Guido da Velate the simoniac Archbishop of Milan. [...]

    Adelaide is a featured figure on Judy Chicago's installation piece The Dinner Party, being represented as one of the 999 names on the Heritage Floor.

    Children:
    1. Amadeo II of Savoy was born about 1050; died on 26 Jan 1080.
    2. Bertha of Turin was born in 1051; died on 27 Dec 1087 in Mainz, Hessen, Germany; was buried in Speyer Cathedral, Speyer, Germany.
    3. 7. Adelheid of Savoy was born about 1052; died in 1079.