Nielsen Hayden genealogy

William d'Aubeney

Male Aft 1146 - 1236  (< 88 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  William d'Aubeney was born after 1146 in of Belvoir, Leicestershire, England (son of William II d'Aubeney and Maud de Senlis); died on 7 May 1236; was buried in Newstead, Lincolnshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 1 May 1236

    Notes:

    Magna Carta surety. Sheriff of Rutland 1195; Sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire 1197; Sheriff of Warwickshire and Leicestershire 1197; Governor of Rochester Castle. He was buried at Newstead, but his heart was interred at Belvoir Priory, Leicestershire.

    From Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans (citation details below):

    Having been forced to give his son to King John as a hostage in 1201, he was a member of the moderate or middle section of the baronage in the conflict between King John and the barons, remaining in attendance on the king until going over to the extreme party upon their taking possession of London on 24 May 1215. Going with them to Runnymede, he was elected a Magna Carta surety in 1215, and then withdrew to Belvoir. Although he was excommunicated by name by the Pope, along with de Quency and Mowbray, as a result of Runnymede, he refused to attend the Hounslow tournament on 6 July 1215.

    He was prevailed upon to return to service in the fall, and was placed in charge of Rochester, but was forced to surrender it to John after a gallant defense lasting from 11 Oct. to 30 Nov. 1215, and was thrown into prison, narrowly escaping hanging.

    In 1216, upon payment of a fine of 6,000 marks [£4000], he was released and regained his lands. He did homage to King Henry III, was entrusted with Sleaford Castle and a command at the battle of Lincoln of 19 May 1217, which earned him high favor. In 1219 and 1225 he served again as an itinerant justice.

    Family/Spouse: Margary de Umfreville. Margary (daughter of Odinel de Umfreville and Alice de Lucy) died before 1198. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. William IV d'Aubeney was born in in of Belvoir, Leicestershire, England; died on 4 Sep 1242; was buried in Beauvoir Priory, Leicestershire, England.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  William II d'Aubeney was born in in of Belvoir, Leicestershire, England (son of William "Brito" d'Aubeney and Cecily le Bigod); died in 1167.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 1166

    Notes:

    Nicknamed "Le Breton".

    William married Maud de Senlis. Maud (daughter of Robert fitz Richard and Maud de Senlis) was born about 1125; died after 1185. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Maud de Senlis was born about 1125 (daughter of Robert fitz Richard and Maud de Senlis); died after 1185.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Abt 1135

    Notes:

    Also called Maud de St. Liz and (mysteriously) Maud de Clare.

    Children:
    1. Maud d'Aubigny died after 1209.
    2. 1. William d'Aubeney was born after 1146 in of Belvoir, Leicestershire, England; died on 7 May 1236; was buried in Newstead, Lincolnshire, England.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  William "Brito" d'Aubeney was born in in of Belvoir, Leicestershire, England (son of Main d'Aubigny and Adele de Bohun); died after 1130.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 1130

    Notes:

    Justice in eyre of Henry I.

    William married Cecily le Bigod. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  Cecily le Bigod (daughter of Roger I le Bigod and Adeliza de Tosny).

    Notes:

    Also called Cecily de Belvoir.

    Children:
    1. 2. William II d'Aubeney was born in in of Belvoir, Leicestershire, England; died in 1167.

  3. 6.  Robert fitz Richard was born in in of Dunmow, Essex, England (son of Richard fitz Gilbert and Rohese Giffard); died before 1136; was buried in St. Neot's Priory, Cambridgeshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Aft 28 Nov 1137

    Notes:

    Also called Robert de Clare, because apparently people were assigned de Clare as a surname entirely at random in the twelfth century. Steward to kings Henry I and Stephen.

    Robert married Maud de Senlis in 1112. Maud (daughter of Simon I de Senlis and Maud of Northumberland) died after 1158. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 7.  Maud de Senlis (daughter of Simon I de Senlis and Maud of Northumberland); died after 1158.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 1140
    • Alternate death: Between 1158 and 1163
    • Alternate death: Bef 1165

    Notes:

    Also called Maud de St. Liz.

    Children:
    1. 3. Maud de Senlis was born about 1125; died after 1185.
    2. Walter fitz Robert was born before 1134 in of Little Dunmow, Essex, England; died in 1198 in Little Dunmow, Essex, England; was buried in Dunmow Priory, Little Dunmow, Essex, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Main d'Aubigny was born in in of St. Aubin d'Aubigny, Normandy, France.

    Main married Adele de Bohun. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  Adele de Bohun (daughter of Humphrey de Bohun).

    Notes:

    Also called Adelise.

    Children:
    1. 4. William "Brito" d'Aubeney was born in in of Belvoir, Leicestershire, England; died after 1130.
    2. (Unknown son of Main d'Aubigny)

  3. 10.  Roger I le Bigod was born about 1045; died on 8 Sep 1107 in Earsham, Norfolk, England; was buried in Norwich Cathedral, Norwich, Norfolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Abt 1050
    • Alternate death: 10 Sep 1107, Earsham, Norfolk, England
    • Alternate death: 15 Sep 1107, Earsham, Norfolk, England
    • Alternate death: Bef Aug 1221

    Notes:

    Earl of Norfolk.

    "Roger Bigod was one of the tight-knit group of second-rank Norman nobles who did well out of the conquest of England. Prominent in the Calvados region before 1064 as an under-tenant of Odo of Bayeux, he rose in ducal and royal service to become, by 1086, one of the leading barons in East Anglia, holding wide estates to which he added Belvoir by marriage and Framlingham by grant of Henry I. His territorial fortune was based on his service in the royal household, where he was a close adviser and agent for the first three Norman kings, and the propitious circumstances of post-Conquest politics. Much of his honour in East Anglia was carved out of lands previously belonging to the dispossessed Archbishop Stigand, his brother Aethelmar of Elham, and the disgraced Earl Ralph of Norfolk and Suffolk. Under Rufus -- if not before -- Roger was one of the king's stewards. Usually in attendance on the king, he regularly witnessed writs but was also sent out to the provinces as a justice or commissioner. Apart from a flirtation with the cause of Robert Curthose in 1088, he remained conspicuously loyal to Rufus and Henry I, for whom he continued to act as steward and to witness charters. The adherence of such men was vital to the Norman kings. Through them central business could be conducted and localities controlled. Small wonder they were well rewarded. Roger established a dynasty which dominated East Anglia from the 1140s, as earls of Norfolk, until 1306. Roger's byname and the subsequent family name was derived from a word (bigot) meaning double-headed instrument such as a pickaxe: a tribute, perhaps to Roger's effectiveness as a royal servant; certainly an apt image of one who worked hard both for his masters and for himself." [Christopher Tyerman, Who's Who in Early Medieval England, 1996]

    Roger married Adeliza de Tosny. Adeliza (daughter of Robert de Tosny and Adelaise) died after 1136. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 11.  Adeliza de Tosny (daughter of Robert de Tosny and Adelaise); died after 1136.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Aft 1130

    Notes:

    "Keats-Rohan [...] suggests that Roger had only one wife. She also refers to a charter of of the time of Henry I (therefore 1100 or later) of Roger and Adelisa for Rochester Priory, attested by their children William, Humphrey, Gunnor and Matilda; on the hypothesis of the Complete Peerage, this would imply that the first wife survived at least until 1100, despite the suggested birth date of around 1095 for Hugh, seen as a son of the second marriage." [Chris Phillips, Some Corrections and Additions to The Complete Peerage]

    Children:
    1. Maud le Bigod died before 1139; was buried in Wymondham Priory, Norfolk, England.
    2. 5. Cecily le Bigod
    3. Jane Bigod
    4. Hugh I le Bigod was born about 1095 in of Earsham, Norfolk, England; died before 9 Mar 1177; was buried in Thetford Priory, Norfolk, England.

  5. 12.  Richard fitz Gilbert was born about 1033 in of Bienfaite and Orbec, Normandy, France (son of Gilbert fitz Godfrey); died before Apr 1088; was buried in St Neots, Huntingdonshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Bef 1035
    • Alternate birth: 1035
    • Alternate death: May 1089
    • Alternate death: Abt 1090

    Notes:

    Also called Richard "de Bienfaite", Richard de Clare, and Richard de Tonbridge. Joint chief justiciar of England in William's absence; in this role he suppressed the revolt of 1075.

    Richard married Rohese Giffard. Rohese (daughter of Walter Giffard and Agnes Flaitel) died after 1113. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  6. 13.  Rohese Giffard (daughter of Walter Giffard and Agnes Flaitel); died after 1113.

    Notes:

    Or Rohais; Rohaidi; Roaxdis.

    Ancestral Roots 8 has her as a daughter of the Walter Giffard who d. 1102; this poses some chronological difficulty. Complete Peerage, Domesday People, and the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography all agree that she was a sister, not a daughter, of that Walter Giffard.

    Children:
    1. 6. Robert fitz Richard was born in in of Dunmow, Essex, England; died before 1136; was buried in St. Neot's Priory, Cambridgeshire, England.
    2. Avice fitz Richard died after 1112.
    3. Adelisa de Clare
    4. Rohese fitz Gilbert de Clare was born about 1055 in St.-Martin-de-Bienfaite-la-Cressonniere, Calvados, Normandy, France; died in 1121; was buried in Abbey of Bec, Eure, Normandy, France.
    5. Gilbert fitz Richard de Clare was born about 1060; died in 1117.

  7. 14.  Simon I de Senlis (son of Landri de Senlis and Ermengarde); died about 1111 in La Charite-sur-Loire, Nievre, France.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Between 1111 and 1113
    • Alternate death: Bef 1113, La Charite-sur-Loire, Nievre, France

    Notes:

    Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton, jure uxoris. "Went to Jerusalem cruce signatus, and returned safely, but, setting out again, d. at the Abbey of La Cherité-sur-Loire, in France, circa 1111." [The Wallop Family, citation details below.]

    From the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography:

    Senlis, Simon (I) de [Simon de St Liz], earl of Northampton and earl of Huntingdon (d. 1111x13), magnate, was the third son of Landri de Senlis, lord of Chantilly and Ermenonville, and a lady Ermengarde. The derivation St Liz (de sancto Licio) appears to be an attempted etymology for Senlis (Silva necta). His elder brother Guy de Senlis (d. 1124), a generous benefactor to Notre Dame de Senlis and St Martin des Champs, inherited the patrimony, his sons becoming prominent supporters of the Capetian kings, with three in succession holding the title of grand butler of France. Another brother, Hubert, became a canon of Notre Dame, Paris. Both the foundation charter of Sawtry Abbey, founded by his son Simon (II) de Senlis (d. 1153), and the late register of St Andrew's Priory, Northampton, believed Simon (I) to have come to England in 1066 and to have been patronized by William I; but his absence from Domesday Book (1086) suggests that his arrival, or at least his endowment, took place under William Rufus. [...]

    According to the De comitissa, Simon de Senlis made a successful pilgrimage to Jerusalem. This was almost certainly after the first crusade, for Suger notes that Simon was captured during William Rufus's Vexin campaign of 1098 against the Capetian heir-apparent, Louis, and subsequently ransomed. Earl Simon witnessed Henry I's charter of liberties issued at his coronation on 5 August 1100 and may have accompanied Henry on his campaign against Robert de Bellême's castle at Tickhill in 1102. He attests royal charters in England from 1100 to 1103, in 1106 and 1107, and in 1109 and 1110.

    At Northampton Earl Simon probably constructed the first castle and walled the considerable settlement that had expanded beyond the earlier defences. Although the earliest surviving fabric of the round church of the Holy Sepulchre in Northampton dates to the second quarter of the twelfth century, it is possible that its foundation was inspired by Simon's pilgrimage. Here he also founded the church of All Saints and the Cluniac priory of St Andrew (between 1093 and 1100) as a dependency of La Charité-sur-Loire. When Hugh of Leicester, steward of Countess Maud, established monks of La Charité at Preston Capes (c. 1090) in emulation of his lord, Earl Simon granted them the endowments of the secular college at Daventry to which they subsequently moved (between 1107 and 1108). The earl also made grants to Lincoln Cathedral.

    Simon de Senlis embarked on a second journey east, but died at La Charité, 'the eldest daughter of Cluny', and was buried there in the great new priory church. It is possible that his body was subsequently moved to the priory of St Neots, which he had patronized. The date of his death is uncertain. He attests a grant of Henry I to Bath Abbey on 8 August 1111 at Bishop's Waltham, as the king was crossing to Normandy, and this may mark the earl's own outward voyage. By midsummer 1113, however, David of Scotland was recognized as earl of Huntingdon, marrying Simon's widow, Maud, although the earldom of Northampton reverted to the crown.

    Simon married Maud of Northumberland before 1091. Maud (daughter of Waltheof and Judith of Lens) was born about 1072; died in 1130; was buried in Scone, Perthshire, Scotland. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  8. 15.  Maud of Northumberland was born about 1072 (daughter of Waltheof and Judith of Lens); died in 1130; was buried in Scone, Perthshire, Scotland.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Between 1130 and 1131
    • Alternate death: 1131
    • Alternate death: Bef 1132

    Notes:

    Also called Maud of Huntingdon.

    Children:
    1. 7. Maud de Senlis died after 1158.
    2. St. Waltheof died on 3 Aug 1159.
    3. Simon II de Senlis was born about 1103; died in Aug 1153; was buried in St. Andrew's, Fife, Scotland.