Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Reynold de Warenne

Male Abt 1126 - Aft 1179  (~ 54 years)


Generations:      Standard    |    Vertical    |    Compact    |    Box    |    Text    |    Ahnentafel    |    Fan Chart    |    Media    |    PDF

Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Reynold de Warenne was born about 1126 in of Attlebridge, Norfolk, England (son of William II de Warenne and Isabel de Vermandois); died after 1179 in Lewes Priory, Sussex, England.

    Notes:

    Sheriff of Sussex 1170-76. Administered the estates of his older brother William, Earl of Surrey, both before and after William left on crusade in 1147. Died as a monk.

    Reynold married Alice de Wormegay in 1167. Alice (daughter of William de Wormegay) was born in in of Wormegay, Norfolk, England; died about 29 Sep 1179. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. Gundred de Warenne died before 9 May 1225.
    2. William de Warenne was born in in of Wormegay, Norfolk, England; died before Sep 1209; was buried in Southwark Priory, Southwark, Surrey, England.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  William II de Warenne was born about 1071 (son of William de Warenne and Gundred of Flanders); died on 11 May 1138; was buried in Lewes Priory, Sussex, England.

    Notes:

    Earl of Surrey; usually styled Earl of Warenne. Advisor to King John at Runnymede.

    William married Isabel de Vermandois after 5 Jun 1118. Isabel (daughter of Hugues le Grand and Adèle de Vermandois) died before Jun 1147. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Isabel de Vermandois (daughter of Hugues le Grand and Adèle de Vermandois); died before Jun 1147.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Bef Jul 1147

    Notes:

    Countess of Leicester. Also called Elizabeth de Vermandois.

    Royal Ancestry says she was living c. 1138 and that she died "13 (or 17) February, sometime before June 1147, when her son, William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey, left on crusade." Several sources say she died in the priory of Lewes, Sussex.

    Via her two husbands and thirteen children, descent from her is so common among modern people with traceable medieval ancestry that Douglas Richardson once jokingly asserted the existence of an exclusive lineage organization called the Society of Non-Descendants of Isabel de Vermandois. Of the eleven root people in this database with demonstrable descent from any monarch, only two would be eligible for membership in such a group.

    Children:
    1. Gundred de Warenne died after 1156.
    2. Ada de Warenne died in 1178.
    3. William III de Warenne was born about 1119 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England; died about 7 Jan 1148 in Laodicea, Anatolia.
    4. 1. Reynold de Warenne was born about 1126 in of Attlebridge, Norfolk, England; died after 1179 in Lewes Priory, Sussex, England.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  William de Warenne (son of Rodulf de Warenne and Emma); died on 24 Jun 1088 in Lewes, Sussex, England; was buried in Lewes Priory, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 1089

    Notes:

    1st Earl of Surrey. One of the Conqueror's fifteen proven companions. Died from wounds sustained at the siege of Pevensey.

    William married Gundred of Flanders before 1070. Gundred was born in in Flanders; died on 27 May 1085 in Castle Acre, Norfolk, England; was buried in Lewes Priory, Sussex, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  Gundred of Flanders was born in in Flanders; died on 27 May 1085 in Castle Acre, Norfolk, England; was buried in Lewes Priory, Sussex, England.

    Notes:

    Countess of Surrey. Also called Gundreda de Gand; Gundrada.

    "Possibly da. of Gerbod, hereditary advocate of the abbey of St. Bertin at St. Omer." [Complete Peerage]

    "[She] was called 'daughter of the Conqueror,' although no evidence was advanced." [Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr., "Royal Bye-Blows: The Illegitimate Children of the English Kings from William I to Edward III", The New England Historical and Genealogical Register 119:94, 1965]

    From Wikipedia:

    Gundred or Gundreda (Latin: Gundrada) (died 27 May 1085) was the Flemish-born wife of an early Norman baron, William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey. She and her husband established Lewes Priory in Sussex.

    Gundred was almost certainly born in Flanders, and was a sister of Gerbod the Fleming, 1st Earl of Chester. She is explicitly so called by Orderic Vitalis, as well as the chronicle of Hyde Abbey. She was also sister of Frederick of Oosterzele-Scheldewindeke, who was killed c. 1070 by Hereward the Wake. Legends based in part on late Lewes priory cartulary suggested Gundred was a daughter of William the Conqueror by his spouse Matilda of Flanders, but this is not accepted by most modern historians. The early-19th-century writer Thomas Stapleton had argued she was a daughter of Matilda, born prior to her marriage to Duke William. This sparked a debate consisting of a series of published papers culminating with those of Edmond Chester Waters and Edward Augustus Freeman who argued the theories could not be supported. Regardless, some genealogical and historical sources continue to make the assertion that she was the Conqueror's daughter.

    Gundred married before 1070 William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey (d. 20 June 1088), who rebuilt Lewes Castle, making it his chief residence. Sometime between 1078 and 1082, Gundrada and her husband set out for Rome visiting monasteries along the way. In Burgundy they were unable to go any further due to a war between Henry IV and Pope Gregory VII. They visited Cluny Abbey and were impressed with the monks and their dedication. William and Gundred decided to found a Cluniac priory on their own lands in England. They sent to Hugh the abbot of Cluny for monks to come to England at their monastery. Hugh was reluctant yet eventually sent several monks including Lazlo who became the first abbot. The house they founded was Lewes Priory, dedicated to St. Pancras. Gundred died in childbirth 27 May 1085 at Castle Acre, Norfolk, one of her husband's estates, and was buried at the Chapter house of Lewes Priory. He was later buried beside her.

    Children:
    1. Ediva de Warenne
    2. 2. William II de Warenne was born about 1071; died on 11 May 1138; was buried in Lewes Priory, Sussex, England.

  3. 6.  Hugues le Grand was born about 1057 (son of Henri I, King Of France and Anne of Kiev, Queen Consort of France); died on 18 Oct 1101 in Tarsus, Cilicia; was buried in Cathedral of St. Paul, Tarsus, Cilicia.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 18 Oct 1102, Tarsus, Cilicia

    Notes:

    Count of Crépy. Count of Vermandois and Valois. Duke of France.

    Also called Hugh "Magnus".

    The place where he died, in what is now south-central Turkey, is the same Tarsus as in "Saul of Tarsus," before he turned into St. Paul.

    Post to SGM by Nathaniel Lane Taylor, 22 Jan 2004, about the battle in which Hugues died:
    [I]t was I who first first posted the death date & circumstances on Hugh of Vermandois when I started this whole messy thread. But the 1101 date is clearly correct, because Hugh died of wounds after the battle in which a Crusader force was annihilated at Heraklea (Asia Minor) in late September of 1101. There is no mistaking the year, in the chronology of the first Crusade's aftermath. Runciman (2:28-29) does not provide a precise date for that battle, but it was one of three major failures of Western forces the Summer and Fall of 1101. See generally his History of the Crusades, vol. 2, chapter 2, "The Crusades of 1101." On the battle at Heraklea, he says:

    "Early in September they [see below] entered Heraclea, which they found deserted as Konya had been. Just beyond the town flowed the river, one of the few Anatolian streams to flow abundantly throughout the summer. The Christian warriors, half-mad from thirst, broke their ranks to rush to the welcoming water. But the Turkish army lay concealed in the thickets on the river banks. As the crusaders surged on in disorder, the Turks sprang out on them and surrounded them. There was no time to reform ranks. Panic spread through the Christian army. Horsemen and infantry were mixed in a dreadful stampede; and as they stumbled in their attempt to flee they were slaughtered by the enemy. The duke of Aquitaine, followed by one of his grooms, cut his way out and rode into the mountains. After many days of wandering through the passes he found his way to Tarsus. Hugh of Vermandois was badly wounded in the battle; but some of his men rescued him and he too reached Tarsus. But he was a dying man. His death took place on 18 October and they buried him there in the Cathedral of St Paul. He never fulfilled his vow to go to Jerusalem. Welf of Bavaria only escaped by throwing away all his armor. After several weeks he arrived with two or three attendants at Antioch. Archbishop Thiemo [of Salzburg] was taken prisoner and martyred for his faith. The fate of the Margravine of Austria is unknown. Later legends said that she ended her days a captive in a far-off harem, where she gave birth to the Moslem hero Zengi. More probably she was thrown from her litter in the panic and trampled to death."

    Runciman cites Albert of Aachen, 8.34-40 (pp. 579-82 in the edition he cites); and Ekkehard, 24-26 (pp. 30-32), among other material on the legend of the the Margravine of Austria, etc.


    It is PNH's contention that this Hugh le Grand is the exact bellybutton of the Middle Ages. His father was a king of France; his mother was one of the daughters of Yaroslav the Wise, Grand Prince of Kiev; and his daughter Isabel married, as her first husband, one of the Conqueror's proven companions at Hastings. Another daughter, Agnes, married a marcher lord of northern Italy. Through his mother he was also descended from three canonized Kievan saints and two kings of Sweden. He married the last member of the Carolingian dynasty. He died on Crusade. He was called Hugues le Grand. Case closed.

    Hugues married Adèle de Vermandois about 1080. Adèle (daughter of Herbert IV and Adela of Vexin) died in 1120; was buried on 28 Sep 1120 in Vermandois, Aisne, Picardy, France. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 7.  Adèle de Vermandois (daughter of Herbert IV and Adela of Vexin); died in 1120; was buried on 28 Sep 1120 in Vermandois, Aisne, Picardy, France.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Between 1120 and 1124

    Notes:

    Countess of Vermandois. Last member of the Carolingian dynasty.

    According to Royal Ancestry, she died "28 September, between 1120 and 1124."

    Children:
    1. 3. Isabel de Vermandois died before Jun 1147.
    2. Beatrice de Vermandois died after 1144.
    3. Agnes de Vermandois died after 1125.
    4. Mathilde de Vermandois was born about 1080.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Rodulf de Warenne (son of Rodulf de Warenne and Beatrice).

    Notes:

    Shown to be next in line by K. S. B. Keats-Rohan.

    Rodulf married Emma. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  Emma
    Children:
    1. 4. William de Warenne died on 24 Jun 1088 in Lewes, Sussex, England; was buried in Lewes Priory, Sussex, England.

  3. 12.  Henri I, King Of France was born before 17 May 1008 (son of Robert II, King of France and Constance of Provence, Queen Consort of France); died on 4 Aug 1060; was buried in Abbey of Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, France.

    Henri married Anne of Kiev, Queen Consort of France on 19 May 1051 in Rheims, Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France. Anne (daughter of Yaroslav I "The Wise", Grand Prince of Kiev and Ingegerd (St. Anna) of Sweden) was born in 1036 in Kiev, Ukraine; died after 1075. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 13.  Anne of Kiev, Queen Consort of France was born in 1036 in Kiev, Ukraine (daughter of Yaroslav I "The Wise", Grand Prince of Kiev and Ingegerd (St. Anna) of Sweden); died after 1075.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Bef 1079

    Notes:

    Also known as Agnes of Kiev and Anna Yaroslavna.

    According to Royal Ancestry, she died "5 Sept., between 1075 and 1078."

    Children:
    1. Philippe I, King of France was born before 23 May 1053; died on 29 Jul 1108 in Château Melun, Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France; was buried in Abbey of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire, Centre-Val de Loire, France.
    2. 6. Hugues le Grand was born about 1057; died on 18 Oct 1101 in Tarsus, Cilicia; was buried in Cathedral of St. Paul, Tarsus, Cilicia.

  5. 14.  Herbert IV was born about 1032 (son of Otto and Parvi); died after 30 Sep 1080.

    Notes:

    Count of Vermandois and Valois.

    Herbert married Adela of Vexin before 1068. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  6. 15.  Adela of Vexin (daughter of Raoul III of Valois and Adele de Bar-sur-Aube).

    Notes:

    Also called Adelaide of Vermandois; Adele of Valois.

    Children:
    1. 7. Adèle de Vermandois died in 1120; was buried on 28 Sep 1120 in Vermandois, Aisne, Picardy, France.