Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Nathaniel Chesebrough

Male Bef 1630 - 1678  (> 48 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Nathaniel Chesebrough was born before 25 Jan 1630 (son of William Chesebrough and Ann Stevenson); died on 22 Nov 1678 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut.

    Other Events:

    • Baptised: 25 Jan 1630, St. Botolph's, Boston, Lincolnshire, England

    Notes:

    Served in King Philip's War; one of the first nine members of the First Church at Stonington; signer of the Pawcatuck Articles, 1658; selectman of Stonington 1675.

    Nathaniel married Hannah Denison in 1659 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut. Hannah (daughter of Capt. George Denison and Bridget Thompson) was born on 20 May 1643 in Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts; died on 18 Aug 1715 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. Sarah Chesebrough was born on 30 Jan 1662 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut; died on 9 Sep 1729 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut; was buried in White Hall Graveyard, Mystic, New London, Connecticut.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  William Chesebrough was born about 1595; died on 9 Jun 1667 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut; was buried in Wequetequock Burial Ground, Stonington, New London, Connecticut.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Abt 1594

    Notes:

    Emigrated 1630 in the Winthrop fleet. First in Boston, then Rehoboth 1643, New London 1649, Stonington 1650. He was a blacksmith, a gunsmith, and literate.

    Along with TNH ancestors Walter Palmer, Thomas Stanton, and George Denison, he was one of the founders of Stonington, Connecticut. He was the first European to make his residence there.

    "William Cheeseborough was one of those men of substance who came to New England to live life as they wished, and not to become part of the Puritan hegemony." [Robert Charles Anderson, The Winthrop Fleet, citation details below.]

    From his Find a Grave page:

    In 1634 he was elected constable of Boston. He later moved to Braintree, and in 1640 he was elected deputy to the Massachusetts General Court. Soon after, he moved to Rehoboth, Plymouth Colony where he took an active and prominent part in organizing the town of Rehoboth.

    The General Court of that colony later ordered him to be arrested for an affray with an Indian, which led him to look further for a new permanent home. John Winthrop, Jr. urged Chesebrough to settle in his new settlement at Pequot, but he decided against it and and finally chose to settle at the head of Wequetequock Cove in the Pawcatuck area instead. It was another friend, Roger Williams, who encouraged and assisted him in moving to Pawcatuck during the summer of 1649 when he moved his family into their new house in Wequetequock, including his wife and four sons, Samuel, Nathaniel, John and Elisha.

    Mr. Chesebrough, traded with the Indians and with people of Long Island, which was prohibited by the General Assembly of Connecticut. In January, 1652, the town of Pequot gave him a large tract of land, which was afterwards liberally enlarged until it embraced between two and three thousand acres. Mr. Chesebrough succeeded in drawing around him a number of "acceptable persons" and the settlement of the town was begun. In 1654, however, the planters wanted to separate from Pequot for religious and civil purposes. This measure was resisted by the planters at Pequot. In the meantime, Massachusetts laid claim to the settlement, and the dispute went up to the court of the Commissioners of the United Colonies. In 1658 the court awarded all the territory east of Mystic River to the Massachusetts Colony, under the name of Southertown, until 1662, when it was included in the new charter, and again became a part of the colony of Connecticut. In 1665, the name Southertown was changed to Mystic. In 1666, it was again changed to Stonington.

    Mr. Chesebrough held numerous positions of trust not only in the Massachusetts Colony, in the town of Rehoboth, in Plymouth Colony as well. He was elected to several positions between 1653 and 1656.

    He held the office of Townsman (Selectman) until Southertown was annexed to Connecticut, and was the first man elected deputy after the reunion. He succeeded in restoring amicable relations with the Court which had been seriously disturbed by the jurisdictional controversy. After his return, he was elected first selectman of the town, and re-elected every year up to the time of his death, on June 9, 1667.

    *****

    His monument in Wequetequock Burial Ground, Stonington, Connecticut, reads:

    WILLIAM CHESEBROUGH
    THE FIRST WHITE SETTLER OF
    STONINGTON. BORN IN ENGLAND
    1594, MIGRATED TO AMERICA
    IN JOHN WINTHROP'S COMPANY
    WHICH PLANTED BOSTON IN 1630.
    AFTER SPENDING A FEW YEARS
    IN REHOBOTH MASS, HE WITH
    HIS WIFE AND FOUR SONS IN
    1649
    FIXED HIS PERMANENT HOME IN
    THIS, THEN WILDERNESSS, AND
    BUILT HIS DWELLING HOUSE
    NOT FAR FROM THIS MONUMENT.
    HE TOOK A LEADING PART IN THE
    ORGANIZATION OF THE TOWN AND
    THE CONDUCT OF ITS EARLY AFFAIRS.
    HE DIED JUNE 9, 1667.
    A BOLD PIONEER, A WISE ORGANIZER,
    A FIRM CHRISTIAN.

    William married Ann Stevenson on 15 Dec 1620 in St. Botolph's, Boston, Lincolnshire, England. Ann was born about 1598; died on 29 Aug 1673 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut; was buried in Wequetequock Burial Ground, Stonington, New London, Connecticut. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Ann Stevenson was born about 1598; died on 29 Aug 1673 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut; was buried in Wequetequock Burial Ground, Stonington, New London, Connecticut.

    Notes:

    According to the marriage license granted to William Cheesbrough of Boston and Anne Stephenson of same on 11 Dec 1620, his father consented and hers was dead.

    Children:
    1. 1. Nathaniel Chesebrough was born before 25 Jan 1630; died on 22 Nov 1678 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut.