Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Rev. Timothy Woodbridge

Male 1656 - 1732  (76 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Rev. Timothy Woodbridge was born in 1656 in Barford St. Martin, Wiltshire, England (son of Rev. John Woodbridge, VI and Mercy Dudley); died on 30 Apr 1732 in Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: of Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut

    Notes:

    Graduatyed Harvard 1675; became minister of the first church in Hartford, 1682; ordained pastor there 18 Nov 1685. His predecessor as pastor was his wife Mehitable Wyllys's previous husband, the Rev. Isaac Foster.

    Family/Spouse: Mehitable Wyllys. Mehitable (daughter of Samuel Wyllys and Ruth Haynes) was born about 1658; died on 21 Dec 1698 in Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Rev. John Woodbridge, VI was born about 1613 (son of Rev. John Woodbridge, V and Sarah Parker); died on 17 Mar 1695 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts; was buried on 19 Mar 1695 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.

    Notes:

    Publisher of Anne Bradstreet, who was his sister-in-law -- sister of his wife Mercy Dudley.

    From Wikipedia:

    John Woodbridge VI (1613–1696) was an English nonconformist, who emigrated to New England. He had positions on both sides of the Atlantic, until 1663, when he settled permanently in New England.

    John Woodbridge VI was born at Stanton, near Highworth, England, in 1613 to Rev. John Woodbridge V (1582 - 1637) and Sarah Parker. John was sixth in a line of men by the same name -- all ministers -- the first of whom, Rev. John Woodbridge I, was a follower of John Wycliffe, a 14th-century translator of the Bible. He studied at the University of Oxford, but, objecting to the oath of conformity, left the university and studied privately till 1634, when he immigrated to America. Woodbridge took up lands at Newbury, Massachusetts, where he acted as first town clerk till 19 November 1638. In 1637, 1640 and 1641 he served as deputy to the general court.

    In 1641 Woodbridge of Newbury purchased the land "about Cochichewick" that had been reserved by a vote of the General Court in 1634. He led a group of settlers there in 1641. The settlers named the town Andover because some of them came from Andover, Hampshire, in England. Woodbridge was ordained at Andover, Massachusetts on 24 October 1645 and was chosen teacher of a congregation at Newbury. Cotton Mather said of him "The town of Andover then first peeping into the world, he was, by the hands of Mr. Wilson and Mr. Worcester, ordained the teacher of a Congregation there. There he continued with good reputation, discharging the duties of the ministry until, upon the invitation of friends, he returned once more to England."

    In 1647, Woodbridge returned to England and was made chaplain to the commissioners for the Treaty of Newport, in the Isle of Wight. On this journey he carried a manuscript of poetry by his sister-in-law Anne Bradstreet without her knowledge. He had it published in London as The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung Up into America, by a Gentlewoman in such Parts. The publication appears to have been an attempt by Puritan men (Thomas Dudley, Simon Bradstreet, and Woodbridge) to show that a godly and educated woman could elevate the position held by a wife and mother, without necessarily placing her in competition with men. The publication was though unauthorized and reportedly, on the publication of Anne Bradstreet's The Tenth Muse (1650), he wrote: "I feare the displeasure of no person in the publishing of these Poems but the Author's, without whose knowledge, and contrary to her expectation, I have presumed to bring to publick view what she resolved should never in such as manner see the Sun."

    Woodbridge settled in New England in 1663 and became teacher and assistant pastor to his uncle Reverend Thomas Parker, M.A. as minister at Newbury. Disagreeing with his congregation on some points of church discipline, he gave up his post in 1672 and became a magistrate of the township. He died on 17 March 1696.

    John married Mercy Dudley before 1640. Mercy (daughter of Thomas Dudley, Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and Dorothy Yorke) was born on 27 Sep 1621 in England; died on 1 Jul 1691 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Mercy Dudley was born on 27 Sep 1621 in England (daughter of Thomas Dudley, Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and Dorothy Yorke); died on 1 Jul 1691 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.
    Children:
    1. Rev. John Woodbridge, VII was born about 1644 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts; died on 13 Nov 1691 in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut.
    2. Rev. Benjamin Woodbridge was born about 1648; died on 15 Jan 1710 in Medford, Middlesex, Massachusetts.
    3. 1. Rev. Timothy Woodbridge was born in 1656 in Barford St. Martin, Wiltshire, England; died on 30 Apr 1732 in Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Rev. John Woodbridge, V was born in 1582 in of Stanton Fitzwarren, Wiltshire, England; died in 1637.

    Notes:

    Rector of Stanton, Wiltshire.

    John married Sarah Parker before 1613. Sarah (daughter of Rev. Robert Parker and Dorothy Stevens) was born before 15 Apr 1593; died in 1660. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  Sarah Parker was born before 15 Apr 1593 (daughter of Rev. Robert Parker and Dorothy Stevens); died in 1660.

    Other Events:

    • Baptised: 15 Apr 1593, Patney, Wiltshire, England

    Notes:

    Described by Cotton Mather, in Magnalia Americana, as a woman "who did so virtuously, that her own personal character would have made her highly esteemed, if a relation to such a father had not farther added unto the lustre of her character."

    Described by Cotton Mather, in Magnalia Christi Americana, as a woman "who did so virtuously, that her own personal character would have made her highly esteemed, if a relation to such a father had not farther added unto the lustre of her character."

    Children:
    1. 2. Rev. John Woodbridge, VI was born about 1613; died on 17 Mar 1695 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts; was buried on 19 Mar 1695 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.

  3. 6.  Thomas Dudley, Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony was born on 12 Oct 1576 in Yardley Hastings, Northamptonshire, England (son of Capt. Roger Dudley and Susanna Dorne); died on 31 Jul 1653 in Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts; was buried on 6 Aug 1653 in Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts.

    Notes:

    JMF's one proven "gateway ancestor" (not counting Alexander Magruder, who is very probable), and one of JTS's eleven.

    From Wikipedia:

    Thomas Dudley was a colonial magistrate who served several terms as governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Dudley was the chief founder of Newtowne, later Cambridge, Massachusetts, and built the town's first home. He provided land and funds to establish the Roxbury Latin School, and signed Harvard College's new charter during his 1650 term as governor. Dudley was a devout Puritan who was opposed to religious views not conforming with his. In this he was more rigid than other early Massachusetts leaders like John Winthrop, but less confrontational than John Endecott.

    The son of a military man who died when he was young, Dudley saw military service himself during the French Wars of Religion, and then acquired some legal training before entering the service of his likely kinsman the Earl of Lincoln. Along with other Puritans in Lincoln's circle, Dudley helped organize the establishment of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, sailing with Winthrop in 1630. Although he served only four one-year terms as governor of the colony, he was regularly in other positions of authority.

    Dudley's descendants include his daughter Anne Bradstreet (1612–1672), the prominent early American poet, and many famous Americans. One of the gates of Harvard Yard, which existed from 1915 to 1947, was named in his honor, and Harvard's Dudley House is named for the family.

    Thomas married Dorothy Yorke on 25 Apr 1603 in Hardingstone, Northamptonshire, England. Dorothy (daughter of Edmund Yorke and Katherine Robins) was born before 14 Jun 1583; died on 27 Dec 1643 in Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 7.  Dorothy Yorke was born before 14 Jun 1583 (daughter of Edmund Yorke and Katherine Robins); died on 27 Dec 1643 in Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts.

    Other Events:

    • Baptised: 14 Jun 1583, Hardingstone, Northamptonshire, England

    Children:
    1. Thomas Dudley was born before 30 Nov 1608.
    2. Anne Dudley was born about 1610; died on 16 Sep 1672 in Andover, Essex, Massachusetts.
    3. Patience Dudley was born about 1612; died on 8 Feb 1690 in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts.
    4. 3. Mercy Dudley was born on 27 Sep 1621 in England; died on 1 Jul 1691 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.


Generation: 4

  1. 10.  Rev. Robert Parker was born about 1564 in Wilton, Wiltshire, England (son of (Unknown) Parker); died in 1614 in Doesburg, Gelderland, Netherlands.

    Notes:

    From the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography:

    Parker, Robert (c. 1564–1614), religious controversialist, was probably born in Wilton, Wiltshire; his parents' names are unknown. He was educated at Magdalen College, Oxford, entering as a chorister in 1575, graduating BA in 1582, and proceeding MA in 1587. From 1585 he was a fellow of Magdalen. While at Oxford, Parker began moving in a nonconformist direction; the authorities had to punish him for not wearing the required robes, and he tried by every means to avoid clerical subscription to church canons. After finally subscribing in 1591, and with the support of Henry Herbert, second earl of Pembroke, whom he served as chaplain, he gained positions in the church. From 1591 to 1593 he was rector of Patney and master of the hospital of St Nicholas, Salisbury, and then from 1593 to 1607 he was prebendary of Stanton St Bernard. In or before 1592 he resigned his Oxford fellowship to marry Dorothy Stevens (d. 1649/50); their daughter Sarah was baptized in April 1593.

    Parker's conformity was always very marginal and in 1607, with the publication in the Netherlands of his Scholasticall discourse against symbolizing with Antichrist in ceremonies, especially in the signe of the crosse, his nonconformist convictions were totally revealed. The work warned about the ceremonial sign of the cross during baptism, because it was abhorrent to God's sense of simplicity and not compatible with scripture. The sign of the cross produced sins such as idolatry, superstition, hypocrisy, impiety, injustice, soul murder, adultery, wrong, slander, and concupiscence. Puritans welcomed the book as unanswerable truth, but Parker's bishop was not pleased. Parker was quickly suspended from his ministry, and 'fled from the storm' by going across to the Netherlands. His flight probably occurred in 1607, but some reports say he travelled across with William Ames in 1610.

    Parker's trail reappeared in 1610 in Leiden, where John Robinson's separatist church provided sustenance for a while to Parker and other destitute refugee puritans, such as William Ames and Henry Jacob. For several years Parker had no visible means of support and could not find a pastorate or chaplaincy. His wife and children initially stayed in England. Secret funds, however, were coming in from sympathetic, puritan-minded merchants so that he could write more fiery, puritanical books; they seem to have sent him and Ames abroad expressly 'to write against the English hierarchy' (Nethenus, 4). However, Parker's second book, De descensu domini nostri Jesu Christi ad inferos (1611), a continuation of a work begun by Hugh Sanford, dealt with erudite arguments about Christ's descent into hell, and did not draw much attention.

    The period of Parker's residence in the Netherlands corresponded with sharp puritan debates about church polity. Both Leiden and Amsterdam had two English churches, one for the separatists (Brownists) and the other for the non-separatist presbyterian English and Scots. Parker clearly rejected the separatists as schismatics, as is evident from a letter printed in Christopher Lawne's Prophane Schisme of the Brownists (1612), yet neither was he fully in tune with the presbyterian position. Instead, he was part of a third or new grouping called the Jacobites or the Amesians—non-separatist (or, said some, semi-separatist) congregational puritans, who included Ames and Jacob. They refused to use the language of separatism, thus remaining loosely within the bounds of the Church of England, but argued for the autonomy of the local congregation.

    In 1611 Parker moved on to Amsterdam, where Pastor John Paget of the English Reformed church took him into his home, like a 'member of the same family and living under the same roofe.' Parker joined the English church on 4 January 1612, and the church elected him elder the same year. His family arrived, and his wife became a church member on 17 October 1612. His powerful preaching endeared him to the congregation and soon there was a move to appoint him co-pastor with Paget. Although Parker welcomed the call, Paget was lukewarm—an ardent presbyterian, Paget had been taken aback at Parker's talk that synods were for advice and counsel only, and concluded that Parker was 'somewhat confused.' He worked to reconvert Parker to presbyterian polity but, when the English government protested against advancement of such an outspoken nonconformist, the city magistrates vetoed his pastoral appointment.

    With the doors closed in Amsterdam, in 1613 Parker retreated eastward: the Lord would provide, 'who I know will be my God as well out of Amsterdam as in it.' Finally, he found work as a chaplain to English troops and pastor of the tiny English church in the frontier city of Doesburg in Gelderland—not a choice position, but he had no alternative. In accordance with Dutch practice, he presented his ministerial documents to the Dutch classis of Zutphen in September of 1613 and received approval to serve. In the early summer of 1614, after only eight months' service, he died. He was survived by his wife, Dorothy, and three children, Sarah, then wife of John Woodbridge (1582–1637), Thomas, and Elizabeth Avery. Thomas Parker studied at Leiden University and, with the support of William Ames, graduated MA from Franeker University in 1617; he was later pastor at Newbury, Massachusetts. Sarah Woodbridge had two sons, John Woodbridge, who also went to Newbury, and Benjamin Woodbridge; she later married Thomas Baylie.

    Two further works by Parker appeared after his death. Exposition of the Pouring out of the Fourth Vial was not published until 1650 (in the Netherlands, like all the others, because permission was not forthcoming to print them in England), but De politeia ecclesiastica Christi, et hierarchica opposita, libri tres, his most controversial work, written in Latin for an international audience of scholars, was printed by William Brewster and his Pilgrim Press at Leiden in 1616 (two versions). Two further editions, to which many printers contributed, followed in 1621 and 1638. The book, on church government, still exhibited some ecclesiological vagueness. Parker approved of both primary congregations and the use of synods (but with rather limited authority for the latter). Although John Paget proclaimed himself satisfied that the book was in line with presbyterian puritanism, the chapters about the primary power of congregations appealed greatly to congregational-minded puritans. A favourite text, much quoted by congregationalists, was that 'all ecclesiastical power is always in the whole congregation'. New England congregationalists especially revered Parker as a founder of the faith: according to Cotton Mather, Parker was 'in some sort the father of all the non-conformists in our age.'

    Robert married Dorothy Stevens before 1592. Dorothy died between 10 Oct 1649 and 11 Apr 1650 in Mildenhall, Wiltshire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 11.  Dorothy Stevens died between 10 Oct 1649 and 11 Apr 1650 in Mildenhall, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 1650

    Notes:

    Puritans and Pedigrees provides the date of her will. It does not provide her probate date, but a footnote points the reader to the National Archives site, where it can be looked up.

    Children:
    1. 5. Sarah Parker was born before 15 Apr 1593; died in 1660.

  3. 12.  Capt. Roger Dudley died before 29 Oct 1588.

    Notes:

    Slain in battle before 1588, possibly at the Siege of Zutphen in 1586.

    "The [Dudley] family has long asserted connections to the Sutton-Dudleys of Dudley Castle; there is a similarity in their coats of arms, but association beyond probable common ancestry has not yet been conclusively demonstrated." [Wikipedia]

    Roger married Susanna Dorne on 8 Jun 1575 in Lidlington, Bedfordshire, England. Susanna (daughter of Thomas Dorne alias Thorne and Mary Purefoy) was born before 5 Mar 1560; died after 29 Mar 1588. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 13.  Susanna Dorne was born before 5 Mar 1560 (daughter of Thomas Dorne alias Thorne and Mary Purefoy); died after 29 Mar 1588.

    Other Events:

    • Baptised: 5 Mar 1560, Yardley Hastings, Northamptonshire, England

    Notes:

    Also called Susanna Thorne.

    Children:
    1. 6. Thomas Dudley, Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony was born on 12 Oct 1576 in Yardley Hastings, Northamptonshire, England; died on 31 Jul 1653 in Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts; was buried on 6 Aug 1653 in Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts.

  5. 14.  Edmund Yorke was born between 1538 and 1543 in of Cotton End, Northamptonshire, England; died before 14 Feb 1615; was buried on 14 Feb 1615 in Hardingstone, Northamptonshire, England.

    Edmund married Katherine Robins on 7 Sep 1568 in Hardingstone, Northamptonshire, England. Katherine died before 30 Jun 1633; was buried on 30 Jun 1633 in Hardingstone, Northamptonshire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  6. 15.  Katherine Robins died before 30 Jun 1633; was buried on 30 Jun 1633 in Hardingstone, Northamptonshire, England.

    Notes:

    "There is no doubt that the widow buried in July 1633 was the Katherine Yorke, late of Northampton, widow, who made the nuncupative will on or about 21 June 1633. Was she the same Katherine that Edmund Yorke had married in 1568? If so, it is surprising that the eldest surviving child was born in 1580, twelve years after the marriage, and that all the other surviving children follow that birth. Even placing before 1580 the two sons with unknown birthdates, there is still a large gap. Although the 1633 burial is the only one found, it seems possible that the Katherine of 1568 died and that Edmund remarried a second wife with the same first name. There being no evidence that such was the case, however, it must remain only a possibility." [Barry E. Hinman, "Edmund Yorke of Cotton End," citation details below.]

    Children:
    1. 7. Dorothy Yorke was born before 14 Jun 1583; died on 27 Dec 1643 in Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts.