Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Henry de Erdington

Male Abt 1274 - Aft 1340  (~ 67 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Henry de Erdington was born about 1274 in of Erdington, Aston, Warwickshire, England (son of Henry de Erdington and Maud de Somery); died after 1340.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Aft 1342

    Notes:

    Knight of the shire for Leicestershire 1309. Knighted by Edward, Prince of Wales (future Edward II) at Westminster, 22 May 1306.

    "He was summoned to Parliament 22 Jan. 1335/6, by writ directed Henrico de Erdyngton, whereby he is held to have become Lord Erdington." [Royal Ancestry]

    Henry married Joan de Wolvey before Jun 1315. Joan (daughter of Thomas de Wolvey and Alice) was born about 1285 in of Wolvey, Warwickshire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. Giles de Erdington was born in in of Erdington, Aston, Warwickshire, England; died after 10 Jun 1359.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Henry de Erdington was born in in of Erdington, Aston, Warwickshire, England (son of Giles de Erdington, Dean of St. Peter College); died before 26 Mar 1282.

    Notes:

    Or Herdington, Erdinton, etc.

    Henry married Maud de Somery. Maud (daughter of Roger de Somery and Nichole d'Aubigny) was born in in of Dudley, Worcestershire, England; died before 1302. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Maud de Somery was born in in of Dudley, Worcestershire, England (daughter of Roger de Somery and Nichole d'Aubigny); died before 1302.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Bef 9 Jun 1302

    Children:
    1. 1. Henry de Erdington was born about 1274 in of Erdington, Aston, Warwickshire, England; died after 1340.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Giles de Erdington, Dean of St. Peter College (son of Thomas de Erdington and Rose); died in 1268.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Bef 10 Jan 1269

    Notes:

    From: 'Colleges: Wolverhampton, St Peter', A History of the County of Stafford: Volume 3 (1970), pp. 321-331:

    Throughout the 13th century the royal chapels were struggling to establish their exemption from episcopal jurisdiction. The church of Wolverhampton secured this privilege with less difficulty than other royal chapels of the diocese. It owed its success principally to Giles of Erdington who first appears as Dean of Wolverhampton in 1224. Erdington made his career in the royal service and became one of the most distinguished of Henry III's judges. His legal skill is evident in the agreement he negotiated with the new Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, Alexander Stavensby, immediately after the bishop's consecration in 1224. This formalized the traditional but unwritten privileges asserted earlier by Peter of Blois. It recognized the dean's right to appoint to the prebends in his church, institute his clergy, and correct them; it admitted the bishop's intervention only on neglect of correction and after an official admonition, and even then allowed him no right to procurations. On the other hand it recognized that the bishop was entitled to be received with honour, to celebrate, preach, and confirm in the church, and to hear difficult cases and appeals from the parish.

    Under the protection of this agreement Wolverhampton enjoyed its privileges unchallenged during the episcopates of Stavensby and his successors until 1260 when Bishop Meuland attempted visitation. Erdington obtained a royal prohibition and in order to defend the agreement of 1224 invoked a papal bull which Henry III had obtained in 1245, exempting royal chapels from episcopal jurisdiction. The dispute ended finally in 1292 when the bishop recognized that all seven royal chapels of his diocese were exempt from ordinary jurisdiction and directly subject to Rome, and reserved only his right to be received with honour, to preach, ordain, consecrate, and confirm in them.

    Erdington also defended the financial interests of the college. He had boundaries perambulated, transactions recorded, and property rights defended in the courts. In 1258 he obtained from the king the valuable grant of a weekly market and an annual fair to be held at Wolverhampton. He secured the goodwill of local landowners by concessions of privilege and of land and promoted good relations with the townsmen by granting his burgesses in 1263 the right to hold their burgages freely by hereditary title with the same privileges and liabilities as the burgesses of Stafford. Perhaps the last benefit the college received from Erdington was an endowment for the maintenance of a chaplain at Wolverhampton. He died probably at the end of 1268, after having held the deanery for at least 44 years.

    Children:
    1. 2. Henry de Erdington was born in in of Erdington, Aston, Warwickshire, England; died before 26 Mar 1282.

  2. 6.  Roger de Somery was born before 1209 in of Dudley, Staffordshire, England (son of Ralph de Somery and Margaret le Gras); died on 26 Aug 1273.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 1272
    • Alternate death: Bef 27 Aug 1273

    Notes:

    Fought at Evesham on the King's side, according to the CP entry on his son-in-law Ralph Basset. Earlier, according to The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, he was taken prisoner with the King at the battle of Lewes.

    Roger married Nichole d'Aubigny before 22 Nov 1232. Nichole (daughter of William d'Aubigny and Mabel of Chester) was born in in of Barrow-on-Soar, Leicestershire, England; died about 1240. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  3. 7.  Nichole d'Aubigny was born in in of Barrow-on-Soar, Leicestershire, England (daughter of William d'Aubigny and Mabel of Chester); died about 1240.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Bef 20 Jan 1247

    Notes:

    Also called Colette.

    Children:
    1. 3. Maud de Somery was born in in of Dudley, Worcestershire, England; died before 1302.
    2. Margaret de Somery died after 18 Jun 1293.
    3. Joan de Somery died in 1282 in Knockin, Shropshire, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Thomas de Erdington was born in in of Aston Manor, Warwickshire, England (son of William de Erdington); died on 20 Mar 1218 in Worcester Priory, Worcester, Worcestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Bef 1219

    Notes:

    High Sheriff of Staffordshire and Shropshire, 1204-1217. Died as a monk.

    Thomas married Rose. Rose died after 1218. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  Rose died after 1218.

    Notes:

    Widow of Adam de Cokefield.

    Children:
    1. 4. Giles de Erdington, Dean of St. Peter College died in 1268.

  3. 12.  Ralph de Somery was born in in of Dudley, Staffordshire, England (son of John de Somery and Hawise Paynel); died between 29 Sep 1210 and 29 Sep 1211; was buried between 1210 and 1211.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Aft 29 Sep 1210
    • Alternate death: 1211

    Notes:

    Note that although Dudley town is in Worcestershire, Dudley Castle was across the county border in Staffordshire.

    Ralph married Margaret le Gras before 1194. Margaret (daughter of William le Gras and (Unknown) Marshal) died after 14 Jun 1247. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 13.  Margaret le Gras (daughter of William le Gras and (Unknown) Marshal); died after 14 Jun 1247.

    Notes:

    Also called Margaret Marshal.

    Children:
    1. Joan de Somery died after 1273.
    2. 6. Roger de Somery was born before 1209 in of Dudley, Staffordshire, England; died on 26 Aug 1273.

  5. 14.  William d'Aubigny (son of William d'Aubigny and Maud de St. Hilary); died on 1 Feb 1221 in Cainell, near Rome; was buried in Wymondham Priory, Norfolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Mar 1221, near Rome
    • Alternate death: Bef 30 Mar 1221, Cainell, near Rome

    Notes:

    Earl of Arundel; Earl of Sussex. Chief Butler of England; Privy Councillor; Judge in the King's Court 1198, 1200, 1218. A King's man at Runnymede.

    Went on Crusade in 1218; was present at the siege of Damietta.

    "In the beginning he was one of King John's favourites, but he joined the baronial party opposing the King in 1216 after the sealing of the Magna Carta. According to the Barnwell Chronicle, when the barons met in London in 1216 to plan the division of England among them, they assigned to d'Aubigny the government of Lincolnshire. In 1217 he switched his support back to the young Henry III." [Leo van de Pas]

    From Complete Peerage I:236-38:

    William (d'Aubigny), Earl of Sussex, and Earl of Arundel, s. & h. He was a favorite of King John, whose concession of the Kingdom to the Pope, 15 May 1213, he witnessed, and whom he accompanied to Runnymede, 15 June 1215. (d) When, however, King John abandoned Winchester, 14 June 1216, to Louis (afterwards Louis VIII) of France, he joined that Prince, but (consistently taking the winning side) returned to his allegiance 14 July 1217, after the Royalist victory at Lincoln. Shortly afterwards he acted as Justiciar, the young King, Henry III, having restored to him his forfeited possessions. He m. Mabel, 2nd da. of Hugh (le Meschin, surnamed Kevelioc), Earl of Chester, by Bertrade, da. of Simon, Count of Evreux in Normandy. She, in her issue, was (1232) one of the four coheirs to her br. Ranulph (surnamed Blundeville), Earl of Chester. He embarked in the crusade of 1218, and was at the taking of Damietta in Nov. 12 19, but d. at Cainell, near Rome, ("quoddam oppidulum Kainel nomine") shortly before 30 Mar. 1221 (when the news reached England) and was bur. at Wynmondham Priory.

    (d) His namesake of Belvoir became one of the sureties for the King's observance of Magna Charta as 'William d'Aubigny, Sheriff of Warwick and Leicester.'

    William married Mabel of Chester. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  6. 15.  Mabel of Chester (daughter of Hugh of Chester and Bertrade de Montfort).

    Notes:

    Also called Mabel le Meschin.

    Children:
    1. Isabel d'Aubigny died before 1240.
    2. 7. Nichole d'Aubigny was born in in of Barrow-on-Soar, Leicestershire, England; died about 1240.
    3. Maud d'Aubigny died between 1238 and 1243.
    4. Cecily d'Aubigny died after 1260.