Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Robert fitz Walter

Male - 1235


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Robert fitz Walter was born in in Little Dunmow, Essex, England (son of Walter fitz Robert and Maud de Lucy); died on 9 Dec 1235.

    Notes:

    Leader of the Magna Carta sureties. From the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography:

    "Fitzwalter, Robert (d. 1235), magnate and rebel, lord of Dunmow, Essex and Baynard's Castle, London, was the son of Walter fitz Robert and Matilda, daughter of Henry II's justiciar Richard de Lucy. Henry I had granted the honours of Dunmow and Baynard's Castle to Walter's father, Robert, the king's steward, a younger son of Richard fitz Gilbert de Clare. The date of Fitzwalter's birth is unknown, as are the circumstances of his upbringing, though he may be the Robert Fitzwalter mentioned in the Histoire de Guillaume le Maréchal as fighting in the Young King's retinue of over 200 knights at the great tournament at Lagny-sur-Marne in 1180.

    "[...]

    "The families of Quincy and Fitzwalter had long been linked, for Robert's father, Walter, and Saer (d. 1190) were half-brothers, the latter's father, also Saer, having married Maud de Senlis, the widow of Robert fitz Richard (d. 1134), and the Quincys held a fief of 1 1/2 fees from the barony of Dunmow. In a noted demonstration of alliance Fitzwalter and Quincy each bore the other's arms on their seals.

    "[...]

    "Fitzwalter's close involvement with the rebellion of 1215–17 and with Magna Carta has ensured his prominence, but historians have been sharply divided in their assessment of him. To Tout, Fitzwalter was 'the first champion of English liberty' (DNB), and prefigured Simon de Montfort. Others, like Norgate and Painter, reacting against this naive idealism, dismissed him as a haughty, selfish, but ultimately cowardly, feudal grandee, ready to obstruct justice by private warfare and to cloak treason with a series of makeshift justifications. Yet, given John's harsh and arbitrary rule, the king's opponents had little option save for conspiracy or armed rebellion, particularly after 1213 when Innocent III fully supported John. To see Fitzwalter falling short of the qualities of a great constitutional statesman is to be as anachronistic as Tout. He may have fought in large part to avenge personal wrongs and to regain lost rights, but he played an important role in sustaining the resistance which resulted in Magna Carta. Although Fitzwalter was resolute in his opposition to John, his participation on crusade and his conduct during Henry III's minority belie the image of a turbulent malcontent. Matthew Paris had little cause to praise Fitzwalter, but the final verdict is best left to him. He 'could match any earl in England; valiant in arms, spirited and illustrious, endowed with many possessions, generous, encompassed by a multitude of powerful blood relatives and strengthened by numerous relatives in marriage' (Gesta abbatum, 1.220–21)."

    Family/Spouse: Rohese. Rohese died in 1256 in Woodham Walter, Essex, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. Maud fitz Walter was born about 1161; died after 26 Jan 1196.
    2. Walter fitz Robert was born about 1219 in of Woodham Walter, Essex, England; died before 10 Apr 1258.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Walter fitz Robert was born before 1134 in of Little Dunmow, Essex, England (son of Robert fitz Richard and Maud de Senlis); died in 1198 in Little Dunmow, Essex, England; was buried in Dunmow Priory, Little Dunmow, Essex, England.

    Walter married Maud de Lucy. Maud (daughter of Richard de Lucy and Rohese de Boulogne) died after 1170. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Maud de Lucy (daughter of Richard de Lucy and Rohese de Boulogne); died after 1170.
    Children:
    1. 1. Robert fitz Walter was born in in Little Dunmow, Essex, England; died on 9 Dec 1235.
    2. Alice fitz Walter


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Robert fitz Richard was born in in of Dunmow, Essex, England (son of Richard fitz Gilbert and Rohese Giffard); died before 1136; was buried in St. Neot's Priory, Cambridgeshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Aft 28 Nov 1137

    Notes:

    Also called Robert de Clare, because apparently people were assigned de Clare as a surname entirely at random in the twelfth century. Steward to kings Henry I and Stephen.

    Robert married Maud de Senlis in 1112. Maud (daughter of Simon I de Senlis and Maud of Northumberland) died after 1158. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  Maud de Senlis (daughter of Simon I de Senlis and Maud of Northumberland); died after 1158.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 1140
    • Alternate death: Between 1158 and 1163
    • Alternate death: Bef 1165

    Notes:

    Also called Maud de St. Liz.

    Children:
    1. Maud de Senlis was born about 1125; died after 1185.
    2. 2. Walter fitz Robert was born before 1134 in of Little Dunmow, Essex, England; died in 1198 in Little Dunmow, Essex, England; was buried in Dunmow Priory, Little Dunmow, Essex, England.

  3. 6.  Richard de Lucy was born between 1105 and 1110 in Luce, Orne, Basse-Normandie, France (son of Aveline Goth); died on 14 Jul 1179 in Lesnes Abbey, Kent, England; was buried in Lesnes Abbey, Kent, England.

    Notes:

    Or de Luci; de Lusci; de Luscy. Called "The Loyal."

    Sheriff of Essex, 1154; Sheriff of Essex and Hertfordshire, 1155-1157; Chief Justice of England under Henry II.

    Died as a cloister member, having resigned his office after Easter 1179.

    Richard married Rohese de Boulogne between 1130 and 1135. Rohese (daughter of William of Boulogne) was born in in of Carshalton, Epsom, Surrey, England; died before 30 May 1151; was buried in Holy Trinity Church, London, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 7.  Rohese de Boulogne was born in in of Carshalton, Epsom, Surrey, England (daughter of William of Boulogne); died before 30 May 1151; was buried in Holy Trinity Church, London, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Bef 1153

    Notes:

    "Richard de Lucy's only known wife was Rose, who died sometime before Queen Maud's death in 1152. Queen Maud and her son and heir, Eustace, witnessed a notification by Richard that he had, 'granted to the canons of Holy Trinity, London, in frank almoin, 20s. yearly rent from Niweton [Newington] for the soul of Roheis his wife, who is buried in their church...'" ["A Rose by Any Other Name: Another Daughter of Richard de Lucy," citation details below. Notwithstanding this, King Stephen's wife Maud actually died in 1151.]

    Children:
    1. Alice de Lucy died before 1219.
    2. 3. Maud de Lucy died after 1170.
    3. Aveline de Lucy died before 1219.
    4. Godfrey de Lucy
    5. Reynold de Lucy died about Jan 1199.
    6. Rose de Lucy
    7. Geoffrey de Lucy was born in in of Newington, Kent, England; died before 1179.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Richard fitz Gilbert was born about 1033 in of Bienfaite and Orbec, Normandy, France (son of Gilbert fitz Godfrey); died before Apr 1088; was buried in St Neots, Huntingdonshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Bef 1035
    • Alternate birth: 1035
    • Alternate death: May 1089
    • Alternate death: Abt 1090

    Notes:

    Also called Richard "de Bienfaite", Richard de Clare, and Richard de Tonbridge. Joint chief justiciar of England in William's absence; in this role he suppressed the revolt of 1075.

    Richard married Rohese Giffard. Rohese (daughter of Walter Giffard and Agnes Flaitel) died after 1113. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  Rohese Giffard (daughter of Walter Giffard and Agnes Flaitel); died after 1113.

    Notes:

    Or Rohais; Rohaidi; Roaxdis.

    Ancestral Roots 8 has her as a daughter of the Walter Giffard who d. 1102; this poses some chronological difficulty. Complete Peerage, Domesday People, and the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography all agree that she was a sister, not a daughter, of that Walter Giffard.

    Children:
    1. 4. Robert fitz Richard was born in in of Dunmow, Essex, England; died before 1136; was buried in St. Neot's Priory, Cambridgeshire, England.
    2. Avice fitz Richard died after 1112.
    3. Adelisa de Clare
    4. Rohese fitz Gilbert de Clare was born about 1055 in St.-Martin-de-Bienfaite-la-Cressonniere, Calvados, Normandy, France; died in 1121; was buried in Abbey of Bec, Eure, Normandy, France.
    5. Gilbert fitz Richard de Clare was born about 1060; died in 1117.

  3. 10.  Simon I de Senlis (son of Landri de Senlis and Ermengarde); died about 1111 in La Charite-sur-Loire, Nievre, France.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Between 1111 and 1113
    • Alternate death: Bef 1113, La Charite-sur-Loire, Nievre, France

    Notes:

    Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton, jure uxoris. "Went to Jerusalem cruce signatus, and returned safely, but, setting out again, d. at the Abbey of La Cherité-sur-Loire, in France, circa 1111." [The Wallop Family, citation details below.]

    From the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography:

    Senlis, Simon (I) de [Simon de St Liz], earl of Northampton and earl of Huntingdon (d. 1111x13), magnate, was the third son of Landri de Senlis, lord of Chantilly and Ermenonville, and a lady Ermengarde. The derivation St Liz (de sancto Licio) appears to be an attempted etymology for Senlis (Silva necta). His elder brother Guy de Senlis (d. 1124), a generous benefactor to Notre Dame de Senlis and St Martin des Champs, inherited the patrimony, his sons becoming prominent supporters of the Capetian kings, with three in succession holding the title of grand butler of France. Another brother, Hubert, became a canon of Notre Dame, Paris. Both the foundation charter of Sawtry Abbey, founded by his son Simon (II) de Senlis (d. 1153), and the late register of St Andrew's Priory, Northampton, believed Simon (I) to have come to England in 1066 and to have been patronized by William I; but his absence from Domesday Book (1086) suggests that his arrival, or at least his endowment, took place under William Rufus. [...]

    According to the De comitissa, Simon de Senlis made a successful pilgrimage to Jerusalem. This was almost certainly after the first crusade, for Suger notes that Simon was captured during William Rufus's Vexin campaign of 1098 against the Capetian heir-apparent, Louis, and subsequently ransomed. Earl Simon witnessed Henry I's charter of liberties issued at his coronation on 5 August 1100 and may have accompanied Henry on his campaign against Robert de Bellême's castle at Tickhill in 1102. He attests royal charters in England from 1100 to 1103, in 1106 and 1107, and in 1109 and 1110.

    At Northampton Earl Simon probably constructed the first castle and walled the considerable settlement that had expanded beyond the earlier defences. Although the earliest surviving fabric of the round church of the Holy Sepulchre in Northampton dates to the second quarter of the twelfth century, it is possible that its foundation was inspired by Simon's pilgrimage. Here he also founded the church of All Saints and the Cluniac priory of St Andrew (between 1093 and 1100) as a dependency of La Charité-sur-Loire. When Hugh of Leicester, steward of Countess Maud, established monks of La Charité at Preston Capes (c. 1090) in emulation of his lord, Earl Simon granted them the endowments of the secular college at Daventry to which they subsequently moved (between 1107 and 1108). The earl also made grants to Lincoln Cathedral.

    Simon de Senlis embarked on a second journey east, but died at La Charité, 'the eldest daughter of Cluny', and was buried there in the great new priory church. It is possible that his body was subsequently moved to the priory of St Neots, which he had patronized. The date of his death is uncertain. He attests a grant of Henry I to Bath Abbey on 8 August 1111 at Bishop's Waltham, as the king was crossing to Normandy, and this may mark the earl's own outward voyage. By midsummer 1113, however, David of Scotland was recognized as earl of Huntingdon, marrying Simon's widow, Maud, although the earldom of Northampton reverted to the crown.

    Simon married Maud of Northumberland before 1091. Maud (daughter of Waltheof and Judith of Lens) was born about 1072; died in 1130; was buried in Scone, Perthshire, Scotland. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 11.  Maud of Northumberland was born about 1072 (daughter of Waltheof and Judith of Lens); died in 1130; was buried in Scone, Perthshire, Scotland.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Between 1130 and 1131
    • Alternate death: 1131
    • Alternate death: Bef 1132

    Notes:

    Also called Maud of Huntingdon.

    Children:
    1. 5. Maud de Senlis died after 1158.
    2. St. Waltheof died on 3 Aug 1159.
    3. Simon II de Senlis was born about 1103; died in Aug 1153; was buried in St. Andrew's, Fife, Scotland.

  5. 13.  Aveline Goth was born in in of Newington, Kent, England; died after 1131.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: 1078, Normandy, France

    Notes:

    "Kinswoman and co-heiress of William Goth." [Royal Ancestry]

    "Sister of William Goth. The latter was an allodial lord along the River Sarthe, temp. William I." [Henry James Young, citation details below]

    Children:
    1. 6. Richard de Lucy was born between 1105 and 1110 in Luce, Orne, Basse-Normandie, France; died on 14 Jul 1179 in Lesnes Abbey, Kent, England; was buried in Lesnes Abbey, Kent, England.

  6. 14.  William of Boulogne was born about 1085 in of Carshalton, Epsom, Surrey, England (son of Geoffrey of Boulogne and Beatrice de Mandeville); died before 1130.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Abt 1159

    Children:
    1. 7. Rohese de Boulogne was born in in of Carshalton, Epsom, Surrey, England; died before 30 May 1151; was buried in Holy Trinity Church, London, England.
    2. Faramus of Boulogne was born about 1105 in of Tingry, Pas de Calais, France; died between 1183 and 1184.