Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Robert Poage

Male 1745 - 1793  (48 years)


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  • Name Robert Poage 
    Born 18 Aug 1745  Rockbridge County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Died 23 Sep 1793  Georgia Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID I26750  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others | Ancestor of PNH
    Last Modified 2 Feb 2020 

    Father John Poage,   b. Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Oct 1802, Rockbridge County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother Jane Boggs,   d. Jul 1802, Rockbridge County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F15990  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Margaret Mitchell,   d. 30 Sep 1793, Georgia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Jane (Jenny) Poage,   b. 26 Apr 1781, Abb's Valley, Tazewell, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Jun 1839  (Age 58 years)
    Last Modified 2 Feb 2020 
    Family ID F15989  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • "[W]ent with Captain Moore to Abb's Valley, for fear of Indians removed in 1784 to Col. Cloyd's farm in Montgomery County and thence a year or so later to old Howard County, Ga." [The Descendants of Robert and John Poage, citation details below]

      Note that Georgia has never had a Howard County -- but the source quoted below does agree that Robert Poage decamped to someplace in Georgia, at any rate.

      The co-maintainer of the WeRelate page about Robert Poage, "co1776", notes that "Abb's Valley was named after Absalom Looney, a neighbor and kinsmen of Capt. James Moore who was married to Martha Poage, sister to Robert. It was located on the waters of the Blue Stone branch of the New River in Tazewell county, Virginia."

      From A History of the Valley of Virginia by Samuel Kercheval (Woodstock, Virginia: J. Gatewood, 1850):

      In the Autumn of 1775, Capt. James Moore removed with his family from Rockbridge county to Abb's Valley, having cleared some land the preceding spring, and raised a crop of corn. A short time afterwards, his brother-in-law, Robert Poage, settled near to him in the same valley. The place was exceedingly secluded, and these two families were ten or twelve miles from any other settlement of whites. As this had been a favorite hunting ground of the Indians, they often visited it.

      Indeed, there was scarcely a ear in which these families were not compelled to leave the valley and take shelter in a fort in the Bluestone settlement. In the spring of 1782, the Indians attacked the house of Robert Poage at night.

      They burst the door open, but finding that there were several men in the house (there happened to be three besides Mr. Poage), they did not attempt to enter the house, but after watching it for some time, went off; and the next morning killed a young man by the name of Richards, who had been living for some time at Capt. Moore's. He had gone out early in the morning to put some deer skins to soak in a pond about a quarter of a mile from the house; and whilst engaged at the pond, he was shot and immediately scalped. At this time the families forted again in the Bluestone settlement; and soon afterwards Mr. Poage removed to Georgia.

      Virginia historical marker XP-5, on Centre St. (Route 102) in Tazewell county:

      Five miles southwest is Abb's Valley, discovered by Absalom Looney. James Moore and Robert Poage were the first settlers, about 1770. In July, 1786, Shawnee Indians raided the valley, killing or carrying into captivity the Moore family. Mary (Polly) Moore, Martha Evans and James Moore (captured earlier) finally returned. They are known as "The Captives of Abb's Valley."

      Virginia Conservation Commission, 1939

  • Sources 
    1. [S3609] The Descendants of Robert and John Poage (Pioneer Settlers in Augusta County, VA.), based on the manuscript collections of Andrew Woods Williamson, Henry Martyn Williamson, and John Guy Bishop, ed. Robert Bell Woodworth. 2 volumes, Staunton, Virginia, 1954.