Nielsen Hayden genealogy

John Macdonald

Male 1723 -


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  • Name John Macdonald  [1
    Born Between 1720 and 1723  Urquhart, Inverness, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Male 
    Person ID I35005  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others | Ancestor of JDM
    Last Modified 18 May 2021 

    Family Margaret Grant 
    Children 
    +1. James Macdonald,   b. 1754, Inverness, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Nov 1856, Brucefield, Stanley Township, Bluewater, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 102 years)
    Last Modified 17 Jul 2019 
    Family ID F20577  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Also called Iain MacEoghainn Oig; Iain Mac Iain Bhain.

      He served with three of his sons, in North Carolina, in the 84th Royal Highland Regiment on the Loyalist side in the American Revolution. Relocated to Bridgeville, Nova Scotia in 1784.

      Situated on the west side of the East River at Glencoe, Pictou County, a memorial cairn bears this inscription on its north face:

      JOHN A. MACDONALD
      AND HIS FOUR SONS
      DUNCAN JAMES ALEXANDER EWEN
      ALL OF THE 84th ROYAL HIGHLAND REGIMENT
      WHO SERVED WITH THE LOYALISTS IN THE
      REVOLUTIONARY WAR OF 1776

      DESCENDANTS OF JOHN MACDONALD OF GLEN URQUHART, SCOTLAND

      A SURVIVOR OF GLENCOE 1692

      From Rawdon and Douglas: Two Loyalist Townships in Nova Scotia [citation details below]:

      John (or Iain) MacDonald was born in Inverness-shire, Scotland. m. (1) Jannet, m. (2) Margaret Grant.

      John McDonald (Iain MacEoghainn Oig) was born at Glenurquhart (about 1720-1723) and belonged to the Glencoe McDonalds. At the time of the Glencoe Massacre, 1692, one of the McDonalds fled to Glenurquhart and settled there. John McDonald was a grandson or great grandson of that man. He was about eight years in the Royal Highland Emigrant Regiment, and three of his sons fought with him in the Revolutionary War on the Loyalists' side. He was also reported to be a veteran of Culloden in 1746.

      In the History of Bridgeville NS, it is written that 'Old' John was over 60 yrs of age when he finally settled in Bridgeville in 1784. According to an article by Rev. Alexander McLean Sinclair in the Eastern Chronicle 'He (Iain) settled in Strathbeg, or the Soldier's Grant, East River. Duncan, James and Ewen Mor settled near him.'

  • Sources 
    1. [S5755] Urquhart and Glenmoriston: Olden Times in a Highland Parish by William MacKay. Inverness, Scotland: The Northern Counties Newspaper and Printing and Publishing Company, Limited, 1893.

    2. [S5757] Rawdon and Douglas: Two Loyalist Townships in Nova Scotia by John Victor Duncanson. Mika Publishing Company, 1989.