Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Edward Dymoke

Male Abt 1508 - 1567  (~ 59 years)


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Edward Dymoke 
    Born Abt 1508  of Scrivelsby, Horncastle, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Gender Male 
    Alternate death 1566  [6, 7
    Died 16 Sep 1567  [1, 2
    Person ID I36785  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others | Ancestor of LMH
    Last Modified 15 Nov 2021 

    Father Robert Dymoke,   b. 1461, of Scrivelsby, Horncastle, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Apr 1545  (Age 84 years) 
    Mother Anne Sparrow,   d. Bef 6 Mar 1543 
    Family ID F21623  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Anne Tailboys,   d. Aft 1577 
    Married Between 1523 and 1 Apr 1529  [1, 8
    Children 
    +1. Frances Dymoke,   d. Between 11 Feb 1612 and 24 Apr 1613
    Last Modified 7 Nov 2021 
    Family ID F21621  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Sheriff of Lincolnshire 1535-36, 1547-48, 1555-56. Knight of the shire for Lincolnshire, 1547, Apr 1554, 1558. Treasurer of Boulogne 1546-47.

      Hereditary Champion of England at the coronations of Edward VI in 1547, Mary in 1553, and Elizabeth in 1559. Knighted March or September (records vary) 1546.

      From the History of Parliament:

      The first Dymoke of Scrivelsby, Sir John, established his right to act as champion of England at the coronation of Richard II on the ground that the office was attached to the manor of Scrivelsby. Sir Edward Dymoke carried out his hereditary duty at the coronations of Edward VI, Mary and Elizabeth. He sued out a pardon in October 1553 as Sir Edward Dymoke of Scrivelsby alias the King's champion.

      Dymoke's status had earlier been put to a more than symbolic test. It was during his first shrievalty of Lincolnshire that there took place the rising of 1536. The rebels came to Scrivelsby on 3 Oct. and forced the sheriff to assume the leadership of their host; moreover, until the banner of the Five Wounds was prepared one belonging to the Dymoke family was used. It was while Dymoke was nominally at the head of the insurgents that the chancellor of Lincoln was murdered at Horncastle, but a week later he and three of his kinsmen joined the royal forces under the Duke of Suffolk at Stamford. Many of those examined after the rising claimed that the gentry, and in particular the sheriff, might have (as one of them put it) 'stayed the rebels with a white rod', but whatever was thought of his conduct he suffered no punishment or disgrace.

      Dymoke's brief tenure of the treasurership of Boulogne lasted from the autumn of 1546 until the following spring. His appointment was mentioned by Sir Philip Draycott in a letter of 4 Sept. 1546, on 30 Sept. his precursor (Sir) Hugh Paulet spoke of expecting him by 1 Nov., and the Privy Council began sending him instructions in October; his successor, Sir Richard Cotton, was appointed on 17 Mar. 1547. It is not clear why Dymoke was appointed to the office, the only one of its kind which he was to hold, or why he relinquished it so speedily. If he went to Boulogne he must have returned before the coronation on 20 Feb. Both the lustre of this occasion and his recent knighthood may help to account for his election in the following autumn as senior knight of the shire in the first Parliament of the reign. He was, in any case, well qualified by birth, fortune and experience, while his marriage linked him with the governing group in the county which was headed by Edward Fiennes, 9th Lord Clinton, who married his sister-in-law, and included his fellow-knight Sir William Skipwith.

      Dymoke was to be re-elected to two Marian Parliaments when he sat with another kinsman-by-marriage, Sir Robert Tyrwhitt II, but there is no indication of the part which he played in the House or of his attitude towards the religious changes in which he became involved there. He was to remain in favour and employment under Elizabeth, and his appointment to a commission to impose the Acts of Supremacy and Uniformity shows that he must have conformed to this further settlement. In 1564, however, he was described as 'indifferent' and his eldest son, Robert, as a 'hinderer': Robert became an open recusant and died in prison for his religion in 1580.

  • Sources 
    1. [S142] Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families by Douglas Richardson. Salt Lake City, 2013.

    2. [S47] The History of Parliament. Some citations point to entries from the printed volumes not yet added to the online site.

    3. [S76] The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press, 2004-ongoing., place only.

    4. [S1842] John Meredith Read, "The English Ancestry of Washington." The Atheneum number 3465, 24 Mar 1894., place only.

    5. [S53] The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215: The Barons Named in the Magna Charta, 1215, and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America During the Early Colonial Years by Frederick Lewis Weis. Fifth edition, with additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and William R. Beal. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1999., place only.

    6. [S6098] A Crane's Foot (or Pedigree) of Branches of the Gregg, Stuart, Robertson, Dobbs, and Allied Families by E. Stuart Gregg, Jr. Columbia, South Carolina, 1975.

    7. [S53] The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215: The Barons Named in the Magna Charta, 1215, and Some of Their Descendants Who Settled in America During the Early Colonial Years by Frederick Lewis Weis. Fifth edition, with additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and William R. Beal. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1999.

    8. [S47] The History of Parliament. Some citations point to entries from the printed volumes not yet added to the online site., says "by 1 Apr. 1529".