Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Margrietje Meijering

Female Abt 1633 - 1705  (~ 68 years)


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  • Name Margrietje Meijering 
    Born Abt 1633  Fort Marguerite, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Female 
    Baptised 20 Apr 1639  Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Died Between 1701 and 1705  Newtown, Long Island, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Person ID I4690  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others | Ancestor of TNH
    Last Modified 16 Nov 2020 

    Father Jan Meyers,   b. Abt 1600, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1633, Recife, Brazil Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 33 years) 
    Mother Teuntje Straetsman,   b. Abt 1614, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Oct 1662, Gowanus, Long Island, New Netherland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 48 years) 
    Family ID F2342  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Hendrick Martenszen Wiltse,   b. Copenhagen, Denmark Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1710, New York, New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 10 Jan 1660  Reformed Dutch Church of New Amsterdam, New Amsterdam, New Netherland Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Children 
    +1. Sophia Hendricksen Wiltse,   b. Abt Dec 1660, Kingston, New Netherland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 4 Dec 1725  (Age ~ 65 years)
    Last Modified 10 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F2321  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Also called Margaret; also called Meyers. Settlers of the Beekman Patent calls her Margret Meyrinck. Zabriskie (citation details below) says "Margrietje was the daughter of Jan Meyers and his wife Teuntje Straitsman. She and her half-brother, Laurens Haff were born in Brazil. The exact spelling of Margrietje's surname is uncertain, but the frequent use of the suffixes 'in' and 'ing' plus the almost complete absence of her patronymic 'Jans,' suggests German rather than Low Dutch ancestry. Her step father, Gabriel Carbosie, was a German."

      She joined the New Amsterdam Dutch Reformed church on 31 May 1674.

      A vignette at Acree/Sachse/Hoover/Ogden/Skipworth/Nelson/TenEyck/Williamson & Associated Families says:

      MARGARET JANSEN MEYERS (c1638-1704) was born near Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil, to Jan Meyers and Teuntje Straitsman, Germans attached to the Dutch West India Company, the expansive trading/colonizing agency that administered this rich sugar-producing region which the Dutch wrested from the Portuguese in 1630. Her father died before she was ten and her mother married Jurian Haff, by whom she had a son, Laurens [...]

      By early 1654, when the Portuguese finally won a nine-year war and obliged the besieged Dutch settlers to leave Brazil, Teuntje was again widowed, with a second daughter, Annetje, by her third husband, who was missing. She and her three children sailed to the Netherlands with most of the other settlers. The West India Company encouraged the displaced colonists to emigrate to New Netherland (New York). Margaret moved there in 1657 upon marrying Herman Jansen Van Lennep, who was recruiting settlers. They were accompanied by her half brother, half-sister and Teuntje, who married for the fourth time upon arrival.

      When Herman died two years later, leaving Margaret with a son, she married Hendrick Martensen Wiltsie, a professional soldier from Copenhagen (the beneficiary of an enduring, fabricated parentage written by a fanciful descendant). While living in New Amsterdam (lower Manhattan), the couple successfully sued a man for damages after his boat collided with their canoe. Teuntje had less luck in court, where she was fined on her second appearance for abusing neighbors who had insulted her.

      Margaret and her husband moved to Wiltwyck (Kingston), where Hendrick was assigned to the Dutch garrison. That village was raided in mid-1663 by the Esopus Indians, who burned it to the ground, killing or capturing many residents. Hendrick, captured with one of his children, was erroneously reported killed, but both were rescued three months later. The following year Hendrick's military career ended when the English conquered New Netherland. He became a farmer and businessman at Newtown (Queens, NYC), where the couple reared their nine children. Margaret died in 1704. Hendrick remarried the following year and died at the age of 89 in 1712. Teuntje had died in 1662, soon after collecting wages owed her third husband, who [was presumed to have] died on the island of Guadeloupe. [...He] miraculously appeared in New Netherland in the mid-1670s, re-united with his daughter and remarried.

  • Sources 
    1. [S1512] Pane-Joyce Genealogy by David Pane-Joyce.

    2. [S4971] Recife Baptisms 1633-1654.

    3. [S779] George Olin Zabriskie, "The Wiltsie Family of Early New York." New York Genealogical and Biographical Record 106:129, July 1975; 106:208, October 1975.