Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Roger de Mowbray

Male - 1188


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Roger de Mowbray died in 1188 in Palestine.

    Notes:

    "[A]ssumed the name of Mowbray. Was, when a boy, at the battle of the Standard, 1137; went with Louis VII of France to the Holy Land 1147; rebelled against Henry III 1147, and had his castles of Thirsk and Kirkby Malzeard taken and destroyed; went again to the Holy Land; founded Byland Abbey." [The Wallop Family]

    "Roger de Mowbray; helped defeat invading Scots at Battle of the Standard 1138; supported King Stephen in period of the Anarchy, fighting on his behalf at the Battle of Lincoln Feb. 1140/1; joined Second Crusade 1147; rebelled against Henry II 1173 and allegedly escaped to Scotland following rebels' defeat, but submitted 1174; again went on Crusade 1186, captured by Saracens 1187 at the Battle of Hittin but ransomed; married Alice, daughter of Walter de Gant and widow of Ilbert de Lacy, and died 1188 in the Holy Land when on the point of returning to England." [Burke's Peerage]

    Roger married Alice de Gant about 1145. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. 2. Nele de Mowbray  Descendancy chart to this point was born in in of Thirsk, Yorkshire, England; died in 1191 in Acre, Palestine.


Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Nele de Mowbray Descendancy chart to this point (1.Roger1) was born in in of Thirsk, Yorkshire, England; died in 1191 in Acre, Palestine.

    Notes:

    "[P]resent at the Council of Clarendon in Jan. 1163/4. In 1172, his father being still alive, he was in possession of the Norman lands. He joined with his father in the rebellion of 1173. He was present at King Richard's Coronation, 3 Sep. 1189, and accompanied him on the Crusade." [Complete Peerage]

    Nele married Mabel before Sep 1170. Mabel died about 1203. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. 3. William de Mowbray  Descendancy chart to this point was born in in of the Isle of Axholme, Lincolnshire, England; died before 25 Mar 1224; was buried in Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, England.


Generation: 3

  1. 3.  William de Mowbray Descendancy chart to this point (2.Nele2, 1.Roger1) was born in in of the Isle of Axholme, Lincolnshire, England; died before 25 Mar 1224; was buried in Newburgh Abbey, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: of Thirsk, Yorkshire, England
    • Alternate death: Bef Apr 1224, Axholme, Lincolnshire, England

    Notes:

    Magna Carta surety.

    Seigneur of Montbrai in Normandy. Constable of York Castle.

    "He would appear either to have been in the King's company on his return from Palestine or to have waited upon him in Germany, because on 20 Nov. 1193 he witnessed a charter of Richard I at Spiers. He was, moreover, one of the pledges in Germany for King Richard's ransom, and did not obtain possession of his inheritance until 1194, paying a relief of £100. In 1197 he was present when the pact against France was made in Normandy between King Richard and Baldwin, Count of Flanders. On the death of Richard, Apr. 1199, he fortified his castles, and was one of the magnates who swore fealty to John only on receiving an undertaking that each should receive his rights. He had exemption from the first scutage of John of 2s. per fee. In 1200 William de Stuteville, as great-grandson and heir of Robert de Stuteville who had been dispossessed after Tinchebrai, renewed the claim of his family to certain of the Mowbray lands, and a settlement was made whereby the claimant was allowed 12 librates of land (Brincklow, co. Warwick) and the service of 9 knights in addition to the fee of 10 knights already held by him of Mowbray. William was abroad in the King's service in 1201 and 1203. On 25 Feb. 1203/4 he witnessed a royal charter at York. On the loss of Normandy in 1205 he adhered to John, and his Norman lands, including Montbrai, were taken into the French King's hand and forever lost to the family. He was with the King on his expedition to Ireland in 1210. In the King's quarrel with the Barons he sided with the latter, and at Runnymede in June 1215 demanded as his hereditary right the custody of the forests in Yorkshire and of the castle of York, the latter being committed to him pending inquiry as to his rights. He was one of the 25 Barons appointed to enforce the provisions of Magna Carta. As he continued in opposition to the King, his lands were forfeited, and he was among the Barons whose excommunication the King procured from Innocent III. He was taken prisoner at the battle of Lincoln, 20 May 1217, fighting for Louis against the young King Henry, but in Oct. he returned to his allegiance, and his lands were restored to him. In Feb. 1220/1 he accompanied the King to the siege of Byham. He defaulted in his service against the Welsh in 1223, and his lands were again taken into the King's hand, but he was repossessed in Dec." [Complete Peerage]

    Family/Spouse: Avice. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. 4. Roger de Mowbray  Descendancy chart to this point was born about 1220 in of Thirsk, Yorkshire, England; died before 18 Oct 1263; was buried in Church of the Friars Preachers, Pontefract, Yorkshire, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 4.  Roger de Mowbray Descendancy chart to this point (3.William3, 2.Nele2, 1.Roger1) was born about 1220 in of Thirsk, Yorkshire, England; died before 18 Oct 1263; was buried in Church of the Friars Preachers, Pontefract, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Abt 1220, of the Isle of Axholme, Lincolnshire, England
    • Alternate death: 1266
    • Alternate death: Abt Nov 1266, Axholme, Lincolnshire, England

    Notes:

    "He was sum. for service in Scotland in Jan. 1257/8, and in 1260 was ordered to be at Chester to serve against the Welsh, being appointed in Dec. with James de Audley to dictate, on the King's behalf, the terms of the truce with Llewelyn. He appears to have sided with Henry III, at any rate in the earlier days of the opposition of the Barons." [Complete Peerage]

    Roger married (Unknown) de Furnival after 13 Apr 1238. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. 5. Elizabeth de Mowbray  Descendancy chart to this point died after Sep 1317.
    2. 6. Joan de Mowbray  Descendancy chart to this point died before 1316.

    Roger married Maud de Beauchamp before 1257. Maud (daughter of William de Beauchamp and Idonea de Longespée) was born in in of Bedford, Bedfordshire, England; died before 4 Apr 1273; was buried in Church of the Friars Preachers, Pontefract, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. 7. Roger de Mowbray  Descendancy chart to this point was born about 1257 in of the Isle of Axholme, Lincolnshire, England; died in 1296; was buried in Church of the Friars Preachers, Pontefract, Yorkshire, England.


Generation: 5

  1. 5.  Elizabeth de Mowbray Descendancy chart to this point (4.Roger4, 3.William3, 2.Nele2, 1.Roger1) died after Sep 1317.

    Elizabeth married Adam de Newmarch before 1263. Adam (son of Adam de Newmarch and Joan) was born before 1236 in of Womersley, Yorkshire, England; died before 20 Jan 1303. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. 8. Robert de Newmarch  Descendancy chart to this point died in Mar 1352.

  2. 6.  Joan de Mowbray Descendancy chart to this point (4.Roger4, 3.William3, 2.Nele2, 1.Roger1) died before 1316.

    Joan married Robert de Mohaut about 1261. Robert (son of Roger de Mohaut and Cecily d'Aubigny) was born in in of Hawarden, Suffolk, England; died before 16 Sep 1275. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. 9. Cecily de Mohaut  Descendancy chart to this point died after 1315.

  3. 7.  Roger de Mowbray Descendancy chart to this point (4.Roger4, 3.William3, 2.Nele2, 1.Roger1) was born about 1257 in of the Isle of Axholme, Lincolnshire, England; died in 1296; was buried in Church of the Friars Preachers, Pontefract, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: of Thirsk, Yorkshire, England
    • Alternate death: Bef 21 Nov 1297, Ghent, Flanders

    Notes:

    Summoned to Parliament by writ 24 Jun 1295, and again 26 Aug 1296.

    Summoned for service in Wales, 1282 and 1283; in Scotland, 1291; on the King's service in Gascony, Sep 1294.

    Roger married Rose de Clare after 15 Jul 1270. Rose (daughter of Richard de Clare and Maud de Lacy) was born on 17 Aug 1252; died after 1315; was buried in Church of the Friars Preachers, Pontefract, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. 10. John de Mowbray  Descendancy chart to this point was born on 4 Sep 1286 in of the Isle of Axholme, Lincolnshire, England; died on 23 Mar 1322 in York, Yorkshire, England; was buried in Church of the Dominican Friars, York, Yorkshire, England.


Generation: 6

  1. 8.  Robert de Newmarch Descendancy chart to this point (5.Elizabeth5, 4.Roger4, 3.William3, 2.Nele2, 1.Roger1) died in Mar 1352.

    Family/Spouse: Maud. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. 11. Adam de Newmarch  Descendancy chart to this point was born in in of Womersley, Yorkshire, England; died between 1344 and 1352.

  2. 9.  Cecily de Mohaut Descendancy chart to this point (6.Joan5, 4.Roger4, 3.William3, 2.Nele2, 1.Roger1) died after 1315.

    Cecily married William de Morley before 1 Oct 1295. William (son of Robert de Morley) was born in in of Morley, Norfolk, England; died before 29 Sep 1300; was buried in Roydon, Norfolk, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. 12. Robert de Morley  Descendancy chart to this point was born in in of Morley, Norfolk, England; died on 23 Mar 1360 in Burgundy, France.

  3. 10.  John de Mowbray Descendancy chart to this point (7.Roger5, 4.Roger4, 3.William3, 2.Nele2, 1.Roger1) was born on 4 Sep 1286 in of the Isle of Axholme, Lincolnshire, England; died on 23 Mar 1322 in York, Yorkshire, England; was buried in Church of the Dominican Friars, York, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: 21 Nov 1286

    Notes:

    Summoned to Parliament by writs from 26 Aug 1307 to 15 May 1321.

    Hanged after the Battle of Boroughbridge, in which he sided with Thomas, 2nd Earl Lancaster, against Edward II.

    From the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography:

    In 1311 on the death of Roger Lestrange, the second husband of his paternal grandmother, Maud de Beauchamp (d. 1273), Mowbray was entitled to succeed to her share of the lands of her father William (II) de Beauchamp of Bedford in Bedfordshire (including Bedford Castle), in Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire, and Kent. This represented the largest accrual of land since the original grants made to the Mowbrays in 1106. It is somewhat curious that, at some time before Lestrange's death, possibly at the time of Mowbray's marriage, William de Briouze had petitioned the king to allow Mowbray to enfeoff his father-in-law with all the estates that Lestrange was holding by courtesy. In 1316 Mowbray secured a licence to grant the Beauchamp manors of Hawnes, Stotfold, and Willington, Bedfordshire, to Briouze for life and in the first collaborative action with Edward II's favourite, Hugh Despenser the younger, Briouze agreed to allow the king to grant the reversion of Mowbray's manors to Hugh. In the same year Briouze secured a licence to settle his Sussex lands upon John and Alicia, expressly excluding the lordship of Gower from the settlement, possibly because he was considering its sale. Although in June 1322 a royal commission of inquiry stated that Briouze had never given Gower to Mowbray, it does appear that by a special grant, of unknown date, Briouze had given the couple the lordship, with reversion to Humphrey (VII) de Bohun, fourth earl of Hereford.

    Somewhat precipitately, Mowbray entered Gower in 1320 without royal licence, possibly because he had discovered that his father-in-law was proposing to sell the estates; Bohun indeed had paid a deposit on the lordship. Clearly without scruples, at about the same period Briouze was also bargaining with Roger Mortimer of Chirk, Roger Mortimer of Wigmore, and, most dangerous of all, Hugh Despenser the younger. For the latter, as lord of Glamorgan, acquiring neighbouring Gower was an attractive prospect, so he used Mowbray's entry without a licence to persuade the king to seize the lordship. Mowbray argued that as the lordship was a marcher territory where the king's writ did not run, he had had no need of a licence. In this he was supported by the other marcher lords, ever anxious to maintain marcher immunity and by then fearful of Despenser empire building in south Wales. Mowbray's reaction was violent and briefly successful. He ignored the king's order to him and twenty-nine other lords not to assemble and joined in the ravaging of Glamorgan. It was probably on this account that he was accused of the murder of John Iwayn, although later John Fornaux confessed to Iwayn's decapitation. Edward II was forced to give way; Mowbray attended the parliament that condemned the Despensers in July 1321 and on 20 August received a pardon.

    John married Aline de Brewes in 1298 in Swansea, Glamorgan, Wales. Aline (daughter of William de Brewes and Agnes) was born about 1290 in of Bramber, Sussex, England; died before 23 Jun 1324. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. 13. John de Mowbray  Descendancy chart to this point was born on 29 Nov 1310 in Hovingham, Yorkshire, England; died on 4 Oct 1361 in York, Yorkshire, England; was buried in Friars Minor, Bedford, Bedfordshire, England.


Generation: 7

  1. 11.  Adam de Newmarch Descendancy chart to this point (8.Robert6, 5.Elizabeth5, 4.Roger4, 3.William3, 2.Nele2, 1.Roger1) was born in in of Womersley, Yorkshire, England; died between 1344 and 1352.

    Family/Spouse: Agnes Fitzwilliam. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. 14. Robert de Newmarch  Descendancy chart to this point was born about 1344 in of Womersley, Yorkshire, England.

  2. 12.  Robert de Morley Descendancy chart to this point (9.Cecily6, 6.Joan5, 4.Roger4, 3.William3, 2.Nele2, 1.Roger1) was born in in of Morley, Norfolk, England; died on 23 Mar 1360 in Burgundy, France.

    Notes:

    Admiral of the Fleet North of the Thames. Constable of the Tower of London. Marshal of Ireland. Summoned to Parliament 20 Nov 1317 to 15 Dec 1357.

    On 24 Jun 1340 he won the first great English naval victory by destroying the French fleet at Sluys. Fought at Crécy as one of the bannerets in the king's division. In 1347, he supported the siege of Calais by blockading the port; in the same year, he killed deer belonging to Thomas Bateman, Bishop of Norwich, who consequently excommunicated him and made him do penance by walking barefoot through the streets of Norwich carrying a wax taper weighing six pounds.

    According to Walter Rye (citation details below) he also fought at Boroughbridge in 1322.

    Robert married Hawise Marshal before 20 Oct 1316. Hawise (daughter of William Marshal and Christian de Burgh) was born about 1301; died before Sep 1334. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. 15. William de Morley  Descendancy chart to this point was born on 24 Jun 1319 in of Great Hallingbury, Bishop's Stortford, Essex, England; died on 30 Apr 1379 in Hallingbury, Essex, England; was buried in Austin Friars, Norwich, Norfolk, England.

  3. 13.  John de Mowbray Descendancy chart to this point (10.John6, 7.Roger5, 4.Roger4, 3.William3, 2.Nele2, 1.Roger1) was born on 29 Nov 1310 in Hovingham, Yorkshire, England; died on 4 Oct 1361 in York, Yorkshire, England; was buried in Friars Minor, Bedford, Bedfordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: of Axholme, Lincolnshire, England

    Notes:

    Governor of Berwick-on-Tweed. He was summoned to Parliament by writs from 10 Dec 1327 to 20 Nov 1360.

    One of the commanders of the English army at the Battle of Neville's Cross. Present at the Siege of Calais.

    Died "of pestilence" [Royal Ancestry].

    From the original Dictionary of National Biography (article by James Tait):

    MOWBRAY, JOHN (II) de, ninth Baron (d.1361), son of John (I) de Mowbray, was released from the Tower, and his father's lands were restored to him, on the deposition of Edward II in January 1327. Though still under age he was allowed livery of his lands, but his marriage was granted, for services to Queen Isabella, to Henry, earl, of Lancaster, who married him to his fifth daughter, Joan. His mother's great estates in Gower, Sussex, &c., came to him on her death in 1331. Henceforth he styled himself 'Lord of the Isle of Axholme and of the Honours of Gower and Bramber.' The De Brewers inheritance involved him in a protracted litigation with his mother's cousin, Thomas de Brewes which had begun as early as 1338, and was still proceeding in 1347. Mowbray had also had a dispute before his mother's death with her second husband, Sir Richard Peshall, touching certain manors in Bedfordshire, &c., which he and his mother had granted to him for life, and in 1329 forcibly entered them.

    Mowbray was regularly summoned to the parliaments and 'colloquia' from 1328 to 1361, and was a member of the king's council from the former year. In 1327, 1333, 1335, and again in 1337, he served against the Scots; but there is little evidence for Dugdale's statement that he frequently served in France. In 1337, when war with France was impending he was ordered as lord of Gower to arm his tenants; next year he had to provide ships for the king's passage to the continent, and was sent down to his Sussex estates in the prospect of a French landing. According to Froissart, he was with the king in Flanders in October 1339, but this is impossible, for he was present at the parliament held in that month, and was ordered to repair towards his Yorkshire estates to defend the Scottish marches. Next year he was appointed justiciar of Lothian and governor of Berwick, towards whose garrison he was to provide 120 men, including ten knights. In September 1341 he was commanded to furnish Balliol with men from Yorkshire. On 20 Dec. 1342 he received orders to hold himself ready to go to the assistance of the king in Brittany by 1 March 1348, and Froissart makes him take part in the siege of Nantes; but the truce of Malestroit was concluded on 19 Jan., and on 6 Feb. the reinforecments were countermanded.

    At Neville's Cross (17 Oct. 1346) Mowbray fought in the third line, and the Lanercost chronicler loudly sings his praises: 'He was full of grace and kindness -- the conduct both of himself and his men was such as to redound to their perpetual honour'. Froissart, nevertheless, again takes him to France, with the king. In 1347 he was again in the Scottish marches. On the expiration, in 1352, of one of the short truces which began in 1347, he was appointed chief of the commissioners charged with the defence of the Yorkshire coast against the French, and required to furnish thirty men from Gower. The king sent him once more to the Scottish border in 1355. In December 1359 he was made a justice of the peace in the district of Holland, Lincolnshire, and in the following February a commissioner of array at Leicester for Lancashire, Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire, Derbyshire, and Rutland. This, taken with the fact that he was summoned on 3 April 1360 to the parliament fixed for 15 May, makes it excessively improbable that he was skirmishing before Paris in April as stated by Froissart. It is possible, however, that the Sire de Montbrai mentioned by Froissart was Mowbray's son and heir, John.

    Mowbray died at York of the plague on 4 Oct. 1361, and was buried in the Franciscan church at Bedford. The favourable testimony which the Lanercost chronicler bears to the character of John de Mowbray is borne out by a piece of documentary evidence. In order to put an end to disputes between his steward and his tenants in Axholme, he executed a deed on 1 May 1359 reserving a certain part of the extensive wastes in the isle to himself, and granting the remainder in perpetuum to the tenants. This deed was jealously preserved as the palladium of the commoners of Axholme in Haxey Church 'in a chest bound with iron, whose key was kept by some of the chiefest freeholders, under a window wherein was a portraiture of Mowbray, set in ancient stained glass, holding in his hand a writing, commonly reported to be an emblem of the deed'. This window was broken down in the 'rebellious times,' when the rights of the commoners under the deed were in large measure overridden, in spite of their protests, by the drainage scheme which was begun by Cornelius Vermuyden in 1626 and led to riots in 1642, and again in 1697.

    Mowbray's wife was Joan, fifth daughter of Henry, third earl of Lancaster. His one son, John (III) de Mowbray (1328?-1368), was probably born in 1329, and succeeded as tenth baron. Before 1353 he had married Elizabeth, the only child and heiress of John sixth lord Segrave, on whose death in that year he entered into possession of her lands, lying chiefly in Leicestershire, where the manors of Segrave, Sileby, and Mount Sorrel rounded off the Mowbray estates about Melton Mowbray, and in Warwickshire, where the castle and manor of Caludon and other lordships increased the Mowbray holding in that county. The mother of Mowbray's wife, Margaret Plantagenet, was the sole heiress of Thomas of Brotherton, the second surviving son of Edward I, and she, on the death of her father in 1338, inherited the title and vast heritage in eastern England of the Bigods, earls of Norfolk, together with the great hereditary office of marshal of England, which had been conferred on her father. Neither her son-in-law, John de Mowbray the younger, nor his two successors were fated to enjoy her inheritance; for the countess marshal survived them, as well as a second husband, Sir Walter Manny, and lived until May 1399. But in the fifteenth century the Mowbrays entered into actual possession of the old Bigod lands, and removed their chief place of residence from the mansion of the Vine Garths at Epworth in Axholme to Framlingham Castle in Suffolk. John III met with an untimely death at the hands of the Turks near Constantinople, on his way to the Holy Land, in 1368. His elder son, John IV, eleventh baron Mowbray of Axholme, was created Earl of Nottingham on the day of Richard II's coronation; his second son, Thomas (I) de Mowbray, twelfth baron Mowbray and first duke of Norfolk, is separately noticed.

    John married Maud de Holand before 26 Feb 1322, and was divorced about 28 Feb 1327. Maud (daughter of Robert de Holand and Maud la Zouche) was born about 1315; died before 10 May 1380; was buried in Swinnerton, Staffordshire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    John married Joan of Lancaster between 28 Feb 1327 and 4 Jun 1328. Joan (daughter of Henry of Lancaster and Maud de Chaworth) was born about 1312; died about 1349; was buried in Byland, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. 16. Eleanor de Mowbray  Descendancy chart to this point died before 10 Jun 1387.
    2. 17. John Mowbray  Descendancy chart to this point was born on 25 Jun 1340 in Epworth, Lincolnshire, England; died on 17 Jun 1368 in Thrace, near Constantinople; was buried in Church and Convent of St. Mary Draperis of Pera, Constantinople.


Generation: 8

  1. 14.  Robert de Newmarch Descendancy chart to this point (11.Adam7, 8.Robert6, 5.Elizabeth5, 4.Roger4, 3.William3, 2.Nele2, 1.Roger1) was born about 1344 in of Womersley, Yorkshire, England.

    Family/Spouse: Emma. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. 18. Ralph Newmarch  Descendancy chart to this point was born in in of Womersley, Yorkshire, England; died after 20 Jul 1403 in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England; was buried in Womersley, Yorkshire, England.

  2. 15.  William de Morley Descendancy chart to this point (12.Robert7, 9.Cecily6, 6.Joan5, 4.Roger4, 3.William3, 2.Nele2, 1.Roger1) was born on 24 Jun 1319 in of Great Hallingbury, Bishop's Stortford, Essex, England; died on 30 Apr 1379 in Hallingbury, Essex, England; was buried in Austin Friars, Norwich, Norfolk, England.

    Notes:

    De jure Lord Marshal. Summoned to Parliament from 4 Dec 1364 to 16 Feb 1379.

    William married Cecily Bardolf after 8 Dec 1326. Cecily (daughter of Thomas Bardolf and Agnes) died on 23 Nov 1386; was buried in Austin Friars, Norwich, Norfolk, England. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. 19. Thomas Morley  Descendancy chart to this point was born about 1354 in of Morley, Norfolk, England; died on 24 Sep 1416 in Calais, France; was buried in Austin Friars, Norwich, Norfolk, England.

  3. 16.  Eleanor de Mowbray Descendancy chart to this point (13.John7, 10.John6, 7.Roger5, 4.Roger4, 3.William3, 2.Nele2, 1.Roger1) died before 10 Jun 1387.

    Eleanor married Roger la Warre before 23 Jul 1358. Roger (son of John la Warre and Margaret de Holand) was born on 30 Nov 1326 in of Ewyas Harold, Herefordshire, England; died on 27 Aug 1370 in Gascony, France. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. 20. Joan La Warre  Descendancy chart to this point died on 24 Apr 1404.

  4. 17.  John Mowbray Descendancy chart to this point (13.John7, 10.John6, 7.Roger5, 4.Roger4, 3.William3, 2.Nele2, 1.Roger1) was born on 25 Jun 1340 in Epworth, Lincolnshire, England; died on 17 Jun 1368 in Thrace, near Constantinople; was buried in Church and Convent of St. Mary Draperis of Pera, Constantinople.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: 13 Sep 1340, Bretby, Repton, Derbyshire, England
    • Alternate death: 21 Sep 1368, near Constantinople
    • Alternate death: 9 Oct 1368, near Constantinople

    Notes:

    Summoned to Parliament by writ, 14 Aug 1362 to 20 Jan 1366.

    Killed in battle with the Turks.

    John Mowbray and Elizabeth de Segrave were Gx4-grandparents of Anne Boleyn (d. 1536):

    John de Mowbray = Elizabeth de Segrave
    Thomas de Mowbray = Elizabeth Fitz Alan
    Margaret de Mowbray = Thomas Howard
    John Howard = Katherine de Moleyns
    Thomas Howard = Elizabeth Tilney
    Elizabeth Howard = Thomas Boleyn
    Anne Boleyn = Henry VIII
    Elizabeth I

    Making TNH a sixth cousin to Elizabeth I, fifteen times removed.

    John married Elizabeth de Segrave after 25 Mar 1349. Elizabeth (daughter of John de Segrave and Margaret Marshal) was born on 25 Oct 1338 in Croxton Abbey, Melton Mobray, Leicestershire, England; died between 1364 and 1368. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. 21. Joan Mowbray  Descendancy chart to this point died after 1407.
    2. 22. Eleanor Mowbray  Descendancy chart to this point was born before 1361.
    3. 23. Thomas Mowbray  Descendancy chart to this point was born on 22 Mar 1367; died on 22 Sep 1399 in Venice, Veneto, Italy; was buried in Venice, Veneto, Italy.