Back to previous post: Two, or possibly three, sermons

Go to Making Light's front page.

Forward to next post: Return of the Dreadful Phrases

Subscribe (via RSS) to this post's comment thread. (What does this mean? Here's a quick introduction.)

November 30, 2018

The first thing that came to our heads
Posted by Avram Grumer at 01:52 AM * 113 comments

“Monster Mash,” “Crocodile Rock,” and “Jailhouse Rock” are all real songs about other, fictional songs that share the same titles as the real songs. Any other examples? And is there a name for this kind of song?

Actually, “Monster Mash” is technically about a dance, not a song, but still, it relates a story which logically presumes the existence of a fictional piece of music pre-existing the real song, and (the peculiar thing is this my friends) leaves open the possibility that the referenced fictional song might not resemble like the real one.

Oh, hey, “Time Warp” from Rocky Horror is another one.

Comments on The first thing that came to our heads:
#1 ::: Devin ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 03:41 AM:

"Come Out Ye Black and Tans" is in the ballpark: the narrator's father sings a song, identified as "this chorus," which is presumably the chorus of the present song as well. But Dad isn't singing the whole song, obviously... And it's possible that Dad's song does have verses (which would then be different verses from the ones we have).

#2 ::: Daniel Martin ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 05:04 AM:

Would "Waltzing Matilda" fit the pattern? I think so, even though we get bits of the pre-existing song embedded in the chorus of the song we have.

#3 ::: Singing Wren ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 07:02 AM:

From the post title, "The Best Song in the World" might or might not qualify. The audience knows only two things about the song:

1. "It was the best song in the world", and being sung, we can’t conclusively say if that was a description or the actual title

2. "The song [they] played that fateful night didn’t sound anything like this song”. I’m of the opinion that this line means the song in question was neither by Tenacious D, nor by Led Zeppelin, since elsewhere you can hear a bit of guitar work that sounds like Stairway to Heaven.

#4 ::: oldster ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 07:26 AM:

"The Song of Phemius" may be related.

In the Odyssey, there's a bard named Phemius, and he sings a song about, well, the Odyssey:

"For them the famous minstrel was singing, and they sat in silence listening; and he sang of the return of the Achaeans—the woeful return from Troy which Pallas Athena laid upon them. " (book 1.325-327)

Not a perfect match, both because there is a lot more to the Odyssey than this brief mention, and also because what Phemius sings cannot contain all of the events in the Odyssey, since they have not all occurred yet.

So this is more like: a ballad which sings about someone singing, not the very ballad being sung (the outer ballad, so to speak), but a different instance of the same ballad-type.

#5 ::: Neil Willcox ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 07:30 AM:

My memory betrayed me; I had thought that "Year 3000" by Busted was in this category. However it is instead merely a temporal paradox, with the lyric declaring "this song had gone multi-platinum." The song is a report on the year 3000 by the band's neighbour Peter who had travelled there and listened to the song.

#6 ::: oldster ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 07:50 AM:

And the only reason I'm
Singing you this song now is cause you may know somebody in a similar
Situation, or you may be in a similar situation, and if your in a
Situation like that there's only one thing you can do and that's walk into
The shrink wherever you are, just walk in say "Shrink, You can get
Anything you want, at Alice's restaurant. ". And walk out. You know, if
One person, just one person does it they may think he's really sick and
They won't take him. And if two people, two people do it, in harmony,
They may think they're both faggots and they won't take either of them.
And three people do it, three, can you imagine, three people walking in
Singin a bar of Alice's Restaurant and walking out. They may think it's an
Organization. And can you, can you imagine fifty people a day, I said
Fifty people a day walking in singin a bar of Alice's Restaurant and
Walking out. And friends they may thinks it's a movement.

And that's what it is, the Alice's Restaurant Anti-Massacre Movement, and
All you got to do to join is sing it the next time it come's around on the
Guitar.

#7 ::: rm ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 08:17 AM:

I was about to name songs like The Twist, Let's Twist Again, Do the Locomotion, but realized there is no fictional song in these. They are about themselves, soundtracks to specific dance moves.

But maybe they are a stepping stone, a gateway drug to popular songs about fictional songs that share a title. Dance songs are the model they deviate from.

#8 ::: oldster ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 09:42 AM:

Another not quite:

[LADY OF THE LAKE]
A sentimental song
That casts a magic spell
They all will hum along
We'll overact like hell
For this is the song that goes like this

[GALAHAD]
Yes it is!

Sorry to be offering multiple near-misses. It's hard to find exact matches (sc. real song about fictional song that shares title"), so I'm brainstorming aloud with anything that approximates.

#9 ::: praisegod barebones ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 10:24 AM:

It’s a poem, rather than a song, unless someone has set it to music (which they should), but James Fenton has a piece that begins

‘Have you not heard the song?
The Song That Sounds Like This’.

It’s called, of course, ‘The Song That Sounds Like This’.

(There’s probably a version of it to be found somewhere on the Internet, but it’s a tricky one to Google.)

#10 ::: Steve C. ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 10:34 AM:

More about a song category than a particular song:

ANOTHER SOMEBODY DONE SOMEBODY WRONG SONG

#11 ::: eric ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 10:42 AM:

Another one of the dance song that named for the dance (or vice versa) is Pata Pata, which can be heard about halfway through this mix.

#12 ::: Madeleine Robins ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 10:55 AM:

Would "The Masochism Tango" qualify?

#13 ::: Carol Kimball ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 11:16 AM:

The Tennessee Waltz

#14 ::: Mark Bernstein ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 11:26 AM:

"Song on the Sand", from the musical "La Cage Aux Folles" would be a possibility, though the title of the fictional song is never explicitly given.

#15 ::: Mark Bernstein ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 11:29 AM:

Tom Lehrer's "The Masochism Tango" would fit the same description as "Monster Mash".

#16 ::: Doug K ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 12:29 PM:

Crocodile Rock always makes me think of American Pie..

"I remember when rock was young
..
But the years went by and the rock just died"

There's a Youtube of Crocodile Rock live on an Italian TV show, Elton aged twenty-something. It's wonderful.

I wonder what the relationship if any between the Spamalot Song that Sounds Like This, and the Fenton poem, is. The poem is in Collected Poems 1964-84 so apparently precedes the song..

The Song that Sounds like This

Have you not heard the song
The Song That Sounds Like This
When skies are overcast and looks grow long
And Radio Three
Is all your tea-time company.
The last of the first infusion comes so strong
The apostle spoon wakes up
And clambers from the cup.
Have you not heard it? Have you not heard the song--
Antithesis of bliss--
The Song That Sounds Like This!

Have you not heard them sing
Those songs that sound like these
When yearning for the telephone to ring.
The sky is dark.
The dogs have gone to foul the park.
The first of the next infusion tastes like string.
Oh melancholy sound.
All the apostle spoons have drowned.
Have you not heard them, have you not heard them sing--
No more, oh please,
Oh give us no more songs,
Oh give us no more Songs That Sound Like These!


#17 ::: Julie L. ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 12:44 PM:

iirc Weird Al has at least two parodies in this vein: “Achy Breaky Song” and “This Song’s Just Six Words Long”. There are probably more.

So it’s not quite self-referential songs... eponymous tribute songs, maybe?

#18 ::: John M. Scalzi ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 12:46 PM:

"Tribute" by Tenacious D:

https://youtu.be/_lK4cX5xGiQ

#19 ::: Jim C ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 01:07 PM:

Off the top of my head:

Hook by Blues Traveler

This Song Has No Title by Elton John

Ballroom Blitz by Sweet (sort of, it's at least self-referential)

Mambo #5 by... Lou Bega (had to google that artist)

Hallelujah by Leonard Cohen describes itself (the fourth, the fifth, the minor fall, the major lift)

#20 ::: oldster ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 01:07 PM:

"Tribute" seems less like the pure cases Avram defines in the OP, and more like variations on Sullivan's "Lost Chord," a song about another song that was infinitely superior to the song you are currently hearing.

(Lyrics by Adelaide Anne Procter)

Seated one day at the organ,
I was weary and ill at ease,
And my fingers wandered idly
Over the noisy keys.

I know not what I was playing,
Or what I was dreaming then;
But I struck one chord of music,
Like the sound of a great Amen.

It flooded the crimson twilight,
Like the close of an angel's psalm,
And it lay on my fevered spirit
With a touch of infinite calm.

It quieted pain and sorrow,
Like love overcoming strife;
It seemed the harmonious echo
From our discordant life.

It linked all perplexèd meanings
Into one perfect peace,
And trembled away into silence
As if it were loth to cease.

I have sought, but I seek it vainly,
That one lost chord divine,
Which came from the soul of the organ,
And entered into mine.

It may be that death's bright angel
Will speak in that chord again,
It may be that only in Heav'n
I shall hear that grand Amen.

Old slobs like me think Sullivan's score is actually pretty wonderful in its own right.

#21 ::: Jay ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 01:15 PM:

Edith Piaf sings a song called "Padam, Padam" about a song whose chorus goes "Padam, Padam, Padam" that she can't get out of her head, or something. (It's in French.)

Maybe the most beautiful example is the Brecht-Weill "Bilbao-Song" where Lotte Lenya keeps trying to remember a song that starts "Alter Bilbao-Mond" (That Old Bilbao Moon) but she can only recall fragments. It is indeed a haunting refrain.

At work we were just talking about "I've Got Spurs that Jingel-Jangel-Jingel" which is about the song the spurs sing ("Ain;t you glad you're single?") We only hear that one line. Maybe the spurs have more to sing. Does that count?

#22 ::: Joel Polowin ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 01:26 PM:

"Martian Hop" would be in the same category as "Monster Mash". I heard them first on the same LP, K-Tel's 24 Greatest Dumb Ditties.

#23 ::: Tom Whitmore ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 01:35 PM:

A song about a real song is "The Band Played Waltzing Mathilda" by Eric Bogle, one of the best anti-war songs out there.

Chumbawamba did a whole album of songs about music, ABCDEFG. The introduction (the first minute here) is obviously relevant; "Everyone Sang" (the next song) is one of the related songs. All the others fit variously well.

Elton John's "Your Song" is relentlessly self-referential, as much as the Spamalot song.

#24 ::: Avram ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 01:38 PM:

“Tribute” doesn’t have the same title as whatever the best song in the world is (most likely “Stairway to Heaven,” though some argue for Metallica’s “One”). And “Stariway to Heaven” is real, not fictional.

Though it’s a tempting enough near-match that I quoted the lyrics twice in the post.

#25 ::: kawayama ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 01:41 PM:

Ev'ry Time We Say Goodbye (Cole Porter)

A lark sings a love song about when you're near, there's an air of spring.

#26 ::: Scix ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 01:42 PM:

There's an old song I heard on the Sesame Street, "La de da de um, What's the Name of that Song?"

#27 ::: Joel Polowin ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 01:46 PM:

I have a nagging feeling that there are a number of Christmas songs (and songs about other holidays, natch) that would qualify -- songs about choirs and/or angels singing. But nothing's coming to mind at the moment.

#28 ::: kawayama ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 01:46 PM:

re: Tribute

remember that “the best song in the world” doesn't sound anything like this song (“Tribute”)
so no, it's not “Stairway to Heaven.”

#29 ::: Tom Whitmore ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 01:58 PM:

Continuing to listen to ABCDEFG: "That Same So-So Tune" is exactly in the groove.

#30 ::: Mark McD ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 02:03 PM:

"Please Mister Please" by Olivia Newton-John, written by Bruce Welch and John Rostill of the Shadows, refers only to the song at "B-17" on a jukebox. I had read long ago that the reference was to a specific song, but Wikipedia doesn't have that info.

#31 ::: oldster ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 02:11 PM:

"Yes sir, that's my baby," is both the name of the song and the refrain of the song *and* (importantly) the very thing that the singer claims that he will say to the preacher on meeting him.

"...When we walk up to the preacher I'll say:
"Yes sir, that's my baby..."..."

So there may be a second, embedded song ("Yes, sir, that's my baby") which the singer will sing to the preacher, a copy of which he is singing to us now.

#32 ::: Frank Dean ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 02:26 PM:

"The Late Greats" by wilco spends a verse on "The Late Great's Turpentine".

"Highway Patrolman" by Bruce Springsteen mentions the song "Night of the Johnstown Flood" in its chorus, which wasn't a song at the time.

#33 ::: ottguy42 ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 02:31 PM:

I think 'That Song' by Big Wreck qualifies.
https://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/bigwreck/thatsong.html

#34 ::: David Crisp ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 03:02 PM:

This seems like a perfect post to ask a question that's bugged me for a while:

If the Greatest Song is the one that Tenacious D played for the devil and then forgot - and I doubt old Nick would have been satisfied with anything less - exactly what were One Direction dancing to?

#35 ::: Bill Higgins-- Beam Jockey ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 03:02 PM:

Though I'm fond of "One of Those Songs," it is, sort of, the opposite of the category Avram defines. With English lyrics by Will Holt, it describes at length its own category of songs:

Well, this is one of those songs that you hear now and then
You don't know just where and you don't know just when
It's one of those songs that are over and then
It's one of those songs that starts playing again
Yes, it's one of those songs that you hear for awhile
That come into fashion, then go out of style
It's one of those songs that you think you forgot
But it's one of those songs you cannot
And although it refers to many other songs, it not only does not name those songs but also claims that this song itself belongs to the class of those nostalgia-provoking songs without even naming itself.

In a sense, this song doesn't even have a name, so we are reduced to referring to it as "One of Those Songs." Which, by the way, makes it somewhat tricky to google for.

Today I learned that the tune of this song is "Le bal de Madame de Mortemouille," by Gérard Calvi. I presume this is French for "One of Those Mortemouilles."

Anyway, Jimmy Durante's recording appeared in 1966 in the U.S.

Unironically, "One of Those Songs" functions as One of Those Songs for me personally, recalling as it does the days when music could be heard on the AM band, when Middle-Of-The-Road (MOR) stations still existed, when I was living in Detroit and listening to WJR in the sixth grade. As Frank Sinatra also sang in 1966 over WJR, it was a very good year.

I'm sure Mrs. Calabash, wherever she is, would agree with me.

#36 ::: Bill Higgins-- Beam Jockey ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 03:14 PM:

Is "Elmer's Tune" describing itself? Probably.

"Opus One," by Sid Carris and Sy Oliver, also seems to be describing itself rather than some other song.

#37 ::: F ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 03:23 PM:

In "The Night They Drove Ole Dixie Down," the people were singing and they went "Na nana nanana na na nana nana na na nana na." Possibly fictitious, unless they were singing "Na Na Kiss Him Goodbye" by Steam or Hey Jude by the Beatles and had somehow sent those songs back to the Civil War era.
------
In "American Pie," there's a line how "we sang dirges in the dark" - also, "the jester sang for the king and queen", but the songs are not further specified. Possibly fictitious?

--------------------
And a couple that probably are not what you're looking for:

Hey Baby (They're Playing Our Song) by the Buckinghams refers to another song, whose title is not given, and it's not clear that the song is fictional or not.

Hey baby, they're playing our song
The one we used to hear when we used to get along
Hey baby, they're playing our song
Let's get back together, that's where we belong

It's the one with the pretty melody
It's the one that made you fall in love with me
It made us feel so groovy
We fell in love, just like in the movies

Hey baby, they're playing our song
The one they used to play when we used to get along
Hey baby, they're playing our song
Let's get back together, that's where we belong

Pleasant memories are coming back to me
Can't you remember the way it used to be
It made us feel like dancing
It gave us time to think about romancing

Hey, baby, hey, baby
Hey, baby, hey, baby

-------------------
A separate thing, if anyone is wondering, in "Night Moves" by Bob Seger, when he talks about humming a song from 1962, he's said that the song he had in mind was the real song "Be My Baby" (which is actually from 1963).
-------------------

#38 ::: F ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 03:31 PM:

Also, from Donovan:

Then when the Hurdy Gurdy Man
Came singing songs of love

"Hurdy gurdy, hurdy gurdy, hurdy gurdy gurdy" he sang
"Hurdy gurdy, hurdy gurdy, hurdy gurdy gurdy" he sang
"Hurdy gurdy, hurdy gurdy, hurdy gurdy gurdy" he sang

(which follows the pattern from above of a singer quoting another singer singing)

---------------------------

In "Odorono" by the Who, there is a fictitious singer who sings a fictitious song but she doesn't get the fictitious guy because she doesn't use the fictitious deodorant "Odorono"

#39 ::: Aethenelle ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 04:21 PM:

As they were singing, “bye, bye miss American pie. Drove my Chevy to the level but the levy was dry.” I’m pretty sure American Pie counts. Not sure on Wierd Al’s parody.

I’m sure several of the songs in Rocky Horror qualify too.

Alestorms’s Scraping the Barrel may also qualify.

12 Months by Cobalt 60 is self referential.

Jukebox Hero is close but not quite being more about the story of becoming than the song that started it.

Ritual Noise by Covenant might fit.

The Song That Never Ends is merely self referential.

#40 ::: Mark Bernstein ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 04:53 PM:

@37: IIRC, the only song title included in the lyrics of American Pie is "Eight Miles High" by The Byrds:

Helter, skelter, in the summer swelter
The birds flew off with a fallout shelter
Eight miles high and falling fast

#41 ::: PatriciaM ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 04:57 PM:

Killing Me Softly, Just An Old-Fashioned Love Song, The Song Remembers When, And The Singer Sings His Song, 76 Trombones, It’s Only a Northern Song...

#42 ::: Casey Roberson ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 05:14 PM:

I've long been undecided on ABBA's "King Kong Song"; I look forward to your decision on the matter.

#43 ::: Jenny Islander ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 05:28 PM:

@Patricia M no. 41: Yes, "Killing Me Softly!"

Trying to hew more strictly to the parameters in the original post is tricky. There's this one, but it doesn't actually have a title in the original manuscript. We just call it "Canta de Amigo" because of the refrain.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zx650R3lZOc

(Translation per the person who posted it:

Three girls were singing of love,
very beautiful young maids,
pining away for love were they.
And then one said, my lady:
-"Sing, my friends, with me
the song of my friend".

All of the three were singing very well
like young girls so in love
and much grieving for love.
And the one who makes me lose my senses said:
-"Sing, my friends, with me
the song of my friend".

What a great pleasure I felt
in listening to their chant at that time!
And it really pleased me fine
all that my lady said:
-"Sing, my friends, with me
the song of my friend".

And the more I listened to them
the more delighted I was!
And it really pleased me so
how my lady said:
-"Sing, my friends, with me
the song of my friend".)

#44 ::: Another Kevin ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 05:52 PM:

Someone mentioned Tom Lehrer's "Masochism Tango" but missed his "Wiener Schnitzel Waltz!"

#45 ::: Erich ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 05:53 PM:

Desperation Samba, by Jimmy Buffett, is another song about a song and dance.

#46 ::: Doug ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 05:59 PM:

"You Never Even Called Me by my Name" by David Allan Coe is about itself and whether it is the perfect country and western song. A near miss by the standards of the post, but otherwise possibly perfect.

#47 ::: oldster ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 06:04 PM:

There must be a number of examples like "The Lambeth Walk," a song about the titular dance.

Any time you're Lambeth way
Any evening, any day
You'll find us all
Doin' the Lambeth walk

Every little Lambeth gal
With her little Lambeth pal
You'll find 'em all
Doin' the Lambeth walk

It was a huge music-hall hit in the late 1930s, starting in London, stretching to NYC (a big hit for Duke Ellington), and as Wiki tells us "... In Germany, big band leader Adalbert Lutter made a German-language adaptation called Lambert's Nachtlokal that quickly became popular in swing clubs. A member of the Nazi Party drew attention to it in 1939 by declaring The Lambeth Walk "Jewish mischief and animalistic hopping"...."

(So weird--he says that like it's a bad thing.)

Some years later there was another English bloke named Reg Dwight who had a very keen ear for music-hall tunes, and I suspect if he had models in mind for e.g. "The Crocodile Rock" then this will have been prime among them.

#48 ::: Julie L. ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 06:33 PM:

I guess there’s the related topic of fictional books that are centered around other fictional books, although there are plenty of stories with a literary McGuffin or lore/clue from a cameo deus ex pagina.

The Necromonicon? AS Byatt’s _Possession_? _The Name of the Rose_?

#49 ::: Bill Higgins-- Beam Jockey ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 06:50 PM:

Doug, #46:

"You Never Even Called Me By My Name" was written by the late, great Steve Goodman and by John Prine.

Goodman used to perform it a little differently every time I heard him sing it. He kept tinkering with the list of ingredients he claimed were missing from the first two verses, so the third verse kept changing.

#50 ::: Startled Bee ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 07:06 PM:

Roxy Music's Oh Yeah

Some expression in your eyes
Overtook me by surprise
Where was I ?
How was I to know ?
How we can drive to a movie show
When the music is here in my car
There's a band playing on the radio
With a rhythm of rhyming guitars
They're playing Oh Yeah on the radio

#51 ::: Tracie ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 07:16 PM:

Angels we have heard on high (as well as mountains and shepherds) are singing Gloria in Excelsis Deo.

#52 ::: Jordan ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 07:46 PM:

"Belinda", by Ben Folds and Nick Hornby, is about a singer's pop hit—also called "Belinda"—about his ex, Belinda; the singer rues writing it because "Belinda" is his biggest hit and he has to sing it all the time.

#53 ::: lolarusa ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 07:50 PM:

In the Carpenters' song Yesterday Once More she listens to the radio waiting for her favorite songs. When they plays she sings along. It makes her smile.

#54 ::: John ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 07:59 PM:

There's also Stardust by Hoagy Carmichael. Though that's a song about how the singer can't remember the song he's singing about, and only has an invented memory of the song. (Song about a false memory of a fictional song?)

#55 ::: Q. Pheevr ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 08:02 PM:

How about “Those Magic Changes,” from Grease?

What’s that playing on the radio?
Why do I start swaying to and fro?
I have never heard that song before,
But if I don't hear it anymore…
It's still familiar to me,
Sends a thrill right through me
’Cause those chords remind me of
The night that I first fell in love to
Those magic changes

#56 ::: Q. Pheevr ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 08:07 PM:

Oh, and “Radio Song,” by R.E.M.

#57 ::: Singing Wren ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 09:12 PM:

Hmm, it seems to me that at least the final verse of Werewolves of London would fit the same pattern as some of the dance songs mentioned previously.

I saw Lon Chaney walkin' with the Queen
Doing the Werewolves of London
I saw Lon Chaney, Junior walkin' with the Queen
Doing the Werewolves of London

I think some other songs mentioned here fall into a some sort of meta-song category. Specifically, a song which describes a type of song, and which is itself in the form of the type of song it describes. The title may or may or may not be the name of the type of song.

Examples I've identified thus far are "The Song That Goes Like This" from Spamalot (type: Broadway show tune), "Title of the Song" by Da Vinci's Notebook (type: 90's boy band pop song), and at least parts of "Traditional Irish Folk Song" by Dennis Leary (exactly what it says on the tin).

#58 ::: Em ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 09:26 PM:

Mark @40 Helter Skelter!

Oh IIIIIIIIII know a song that gets on everybody's nerves, everybody's nerves, everybody's nerves!
I know a song that gets on everybody's nerves, and it goes something like this:

Oh IIIIIIIIII know a song that gets on everybody's nerves... (and so on. The song ends when the responsible adults get really irked.)

#59 ::: Forrest ::: (view all by) ::: November 30, 2018, 11:21 PM:

Don't forget the Monster Swim, Bobby Pickett's follow-up to the Monster Mash, that was another song about a fictional Monster Mash. I guess if you find a winning formula, stick with it.

#60 ::: billy joel ::: (view all by) ::: December 01, 2018, 02:47 AM:

Son, can you play me a memory
I'm not really sure how it goes
But it's sad and it's sweet and I knew it complete
When I wore a younger man's clothes

Piano Man
Billy Joel

#61 ::: Crazysoph ::: (view all by) ::: December 01, 2018, 02:51 AM:

The references to other songs might be too vague to qualify according to the OP's standard, but...

may I present, "Video Killed the Radio Star" by The Buggles?

I heard you on the wireless back in fifty two
Lying awake intent at tuning in on you
If I was young it didn't stop you coming through
Oh a oh
They took the credit for your second symphony
Rewritten by machine on new technology
And now I understand the problems you can see
Oh a oh
I met your children
Oh a oh
What did you tell them?
Video killed the radio star
Video killed the radio star
Pictures came and broke your heart
Oh, a, a, a, oh
And now we meet in an abandoned studio
We hear the playback and it seems so long ago
And you remember the jingles used to go
Oh-a oh
You were the first one
Oh-a oh
You were the last one
Video killed the radio star
Video killed the radio star
In my mind and in my car, we can't rewind we've gone to far
Oh-a-aho oh
Oh-a-aho oh
Video…

Crazy(and amused at the time-binding quality of this piece - which she first listened to while being a junior year abroad student in Italy)Soph

#62 ::: David Goldfarb ::: (view all by) ::: December 01, 2018, 04:00 AM:

oldster@4: There were lots of stories about the return from Troy besides the Odyssey. Remember that by the time Odysseus made it to Phaiakia ten years had gone by. Agamemnon had been murdered, Lesser Ajax had been smited by the gods, there had been lots of stuff for bards to sing about.

#63 ::: supergee ::: (view all by) ::: December 01, 2018, 06:06 AM:

"Bonaparte's Retreat" by PeeWee King

#64 ::: Julle ::: (view all by) ::: December 01, 2018, 08:23 AM:

Bloodsport For All by Carter USM
The chorus goes:
"And the coldest stream guards of them all
sang God Save The Queen and Bloodsport For All"
AFAIK there exists no such song?

#65 ::: Stefan Jones ::: (view all by) ::: December 01, 2018, 10:54 AM:

Not sure about:

This is the song that never ends
It just goes on and on my friends
Some people started singing it
Not knowing what it was
And they'll continue singing it because . . .

#66 ::: oldster ::: (view all by) ::: December 01, 2018, 11:13 AM:

David Goldfarb @62--

Very true! That's why I retreated to the claim that the song-inside-the-song is a different instance of the same *type* as the outer song.

The Odyssey is, generically speaking a "nostos," a song describing someone's return home, and specifically it is the nostos of Odysseus.
Phemius sang the nostoi of one or more Achaean heroes, probably omitting the case of Odysseus because it was not yet concluded.

Thanks for reminding us about the other nostoi. I did not take the pains to go into details about them, because that would have given me nost-algia.

#67 ::: Postagoras ::: (view all by) ::: December 01, 2018, 11:31 AM:

In the category of "songs about themselves" a great example is Here Is The Chorus by Marcy Marxer and Cathy Fink.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=%23&ved=2ahUKEwix3cnAhf_eAhWRylkKHcX9CtMQ8DUwAnoECAsQKQ&usg=AOvVaw0VTJzWxrN8ZFOD4xbU2nov

#68 ::: Nate ::: (view all by) ::: December 01, 2018, 01:11 PM:

I submit that Waltzing Matilda is not about a song at all, but rather a traveling worker stealing a sheep and drowning himself when the authorities come for him, and thusly does NOT belong in this list

#69 ::: Theophylact ::: (view all by) ::: December 01, 2018, 02:39 PM:

The song's unspecified, but...

Let's all get up and dance to a song
That was a hit before your mother was born
Though she was born a long long time ago
Your mother should know (your mother should)
Your mother should know

Sing it again

Let's all get up and dance to a song
That was a hit before your mother was born
Though she was born a long long time ago
Your mother should know (your mother should)
Your mother should know

Lift up your hearts and sing me a song
That was a hit before your mother was born
Though she was born a long long time ago
Your mother should know (your mother should)
Your mother should know

Your mother should know (your mother should)
Your mother should know

Sing it again

Da da…

#70 ::: Tom Whitmore ::: (view all by) ::: December 01, 2018, 03:15 PM:

Surprised that nobody seems to have mentioned "Waltzing's for Dreamers" by Richard Thompson -- it's not about a specific song, but it is about someone asking for a tune.

#71 ::: David Crisp ::: (view all by) ::: December 01, 2018, 05:47 PM:

PatriciaM @ 41: The writers of "Killing me Softly" have specifically said it's about Don McLean's "Empty Chairs". IDK if that invalidates it for the purpose of this thread.

#72 ::: Jim Parish ::: (view all by) ::: December 01, 2018, 06:28 PM:

David Crisp @71: Ooh. I had not heard that. I'll have to listen to "Empty Chairs" again with that in mind.

#73 ::: Melissa Mead ::: (view all by) ::: December 01, 2018, 10:09 PM:

Does this count?


CATS – Jellicle Songs For Jellicle Cats Lyrics
SOLO:
Are you blind when you're born? Can you see in the dark?
Dare you look at a king? Would you sit on his throne?
Can you say of your bite that it's worse than your bark?
Are you cock of the walk when you're walking alone?

Because jellicles are and jellicles do
Jellicles do and jellicles would
Jellicles would and jellicles can
Jellicles can and jellicles do

When you fall on your head, do you land on your feet?
Are you tense when you sense there's a storm in the air?
Can you find your way blind when you're lost in the street?
Do you know how to go to the heaviside layer?
Because jellicles can and jellicles do

Jellicles do and jellicles can
Jellicles can and jellicles do
Jellicles do and jellicles can
Jellicles can and jellicles do

Can you ride on a broomstick to places far distant?
Familiar with candle, with book, and with bell?
Were you Whittington's friend? The Pied Piper's assistant?
Have you been an alumnus of heaven and hell?

Are you mean like a minx? Are you lean like a lynx?
Are you keen to be seen when you're smelling a rat?
Were you there when the pharaoh commissioned the Sphinx?
If you were, and you are, you're a jellicle cat

Jellicle songs for jellicle cats
Jellicle songs for jellicle cats
Jellicle songs for jellicle cats
Jellicle songs for jellicle cats
Jellicle songs for jellicle cats

We can dive through the air like a flying trapeze
We can turn double somersaults, bounce on a tire
We can run up a wall, we can swing through the trees
We can balance on bars, we can walk on a wire

Jellicles can and jellicles do
Jellicles can and jellicles do
Jellicles can and jellicles do
Jellicles can and jellicles do
Jellicle songs for jellicle cats
Jellicle songs for jellicle cats
Jellicle songs for jellicle cats
Jellicle songs for jellicle cats

Can you sing at the same time in more than one key?
Duets by Rossini and waltzes by Strauss?
And can you (as cats do) begin with a 'C'?
That always triumphantly brings down the house?

Jellicle cats are queen of the nights
Singing at astronomical heights
Handling pieces from the 'Messiah'
Hallelujah, angelical Choir

The mystical divinity of unashamed felinity
Round the cathedral rang 'Vivat'
Life to the everlasting cat!

Feline, fearless, faithful and true
To others who do-what

Jellicles do and jellicles can
Jellicles can and jellicles do
Jellicle cats sing jellicle chants
Jellicles old and jellicles new
Jellicle song and jellicle dance
Jellicle songs for jellicle cats
Jellicle songs for jellicle cats
Jellicle songs for jellicle cats
Jellicle songs for jellicle cats

Practical cats, dramatical cats
Pragmatical cats, fanatical cats
Oratorical cats, Delphicoracle cats
Skeptical cats, Dispeptical cats
Romantical cats, Pedantical cats
Critical cats, parasitical cats
Allegorical cats, metaphorical cats
Statistical cats and mystical cats
Political cats, hypocritical cats
Clerical cats, hysterical cats
Cynical cats, rabbinical cats

Jellicle songs for jellicle cats
Jellicle songs for jellicle cats
Jellicle songs for jellicle cats
Jellicle songs for jellicle cats
Jellicle songs for jellicle cats

But the cats are not alone. Humans (the audience) are present
in the cats' private world. The cats are at first reluctant and
suspicious to include others in their domain.

SOLO:
There's a man over there with a look of surprise
As much as to say well now how about that?
Do I actually see with my own very eyes
A man who's not heard of a jellicle cat?

MAN:
What's a jellicle cat?

ALL (Echoing):
What's a jellicle cat?

#74 ::: Clifton ::: (view all by) ::: December 01, 2018, 11:42 PM:

I just remembered one - how about 'Soldier's Joy'?

It's got some widely divergent lyrics set to it (without even counting the Holy Modal Rounders' more scurrilous lyrics) but some sets at least have a chorus about playing or singing a song called 'Soldier's Joy'

#75 ::: Clifton ::: (view all by) ::: December 01, 2018, 11:46 PM:

On reflection since Soldier's Joy was a fiddle tune long before those lyrics, I guess it doesn't count as fictional.

#76 ::: Maria D. ::: (view all by) ::: December 02, 2018, 09:10 AM:

"Contact" by Trocadero has this refrain:

Riding on our shiny metal horses
Singing a rider's song
One of us will be forgotten
The other will be wrong

~~~~

"Drunken Lullabies" by Flogging Molly

Refrain:
Must it take a life for hateful eyes
To glisten once again
Cause we find ourselves in the same old mess
Singin' drunken lullabies

~~~

"Boogie on the Beach" by Red Elvises


Last night Jesus called me on the phone,
I was surprised,
This morning he called again,
And he said:
Why don't we do some Boogie-Voogie,
Boogie-Voogie on the beach...

Last night I dreamt of you,
You looked so good in that red dress,
And those blue suede shoes,
Why don't we do some Boogie-Voogie....

#77 ::: dez ::: (view all by) ::: December 02, 2018, 11:02 AM:

You'll grow in the ghetto livin' second-rate
And your eyes will sing a song called Deep Hate

Grandmaster Flash "The Message"

#78 ::: Diatryma ::: (view all by) ::: December 02, 2018, 11:32 AM:

There's a related category of songs that are about what it's like (typically how proud one is) to be the kind of person who listens to the song. I'm most familiar with the country variants, but I think that rap and hiphop have their own. And probably any musical genre that doesn't consider itself mainstream, since then you get the geek vs mundane thing going.

#79 ::: Matthew Ernest ::: (view all by) ::: December 02, 2018, 04:25 PM:

"Box Set" by Barenaked Ladies is about their fictional Box Set which contains a) on the first disc, all their greatest hits which considering this song was on their first album this entire category is fictional, and b) on the third disc, space for new material which was pulled because another label owned the rights so these songs might be fictional as well.

#80 ::: Don P. ::: (view all by) ::: December 02, 2018, 05:14 PM:

"Monster Mash" has one chorus that says

They played the mash, the monster mash

which suggests that the mash is both dance and song.

But I challenge the inclusion of "Time Warp", which is a song about how to do a dance, not about a song as such. It's like the Hokey Pokey. I join @rm in separating these (like "The Twist") from songs that refer to other songs.

#81 ::: Patrick Nielsen Hayden ::: (view all by) ::: December 03, 2018, 09:44 AM:

Mark Bernstein, #40: IIRC, the only song title included in the lyrics of American Pie is "Eight Miles High" by The Byrds

There are at least two others. The verse that refers to "Eight Miles High" also refers to the Beatles' "Helter Skelter." And earlier in the song, the line "Did you write the book of love" surely refers to the 1958 hit "The Book of Love" by the Monotones.

#82 ::: oldster ::: (view all by) ::: December 03, 2018, 09:54 AM:

Wait, *who* wrote "The Book of Love"?

I wonder....

It looks to me as the "The Book of Love" (written by Warren Davis, George Malone and Charles Patrick), refers to a different text,
titled "The Book of Love," whose authorship is unknown to Davis, Malone, and Patrick.

Not a song about a fictional song of the same title, but a song about a fictional text of the same title.

(Though the fictional text would probably be shelved in non-fiction.)

#83 ::: oldster ::: (view all by) ::: December 03, 2018, 11:36 AM:

Reflecting on the Necronomicon, I wonder whether most fictional books are nonfiction?

They are usually introduced for the purpose of establishing authority, after all.

Ah bless you, Wikipedia:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fictional_book

May I take this opportunity to ask all of you good people to contribute your widow's mite to Wikipedia?

It is as close to our original hopes for the internet, as Facebook is now a realization of our worst fears.

#84 ::: Dave Crisp ::: (view all by) ::: December 03, 2018, 11:44 AM:

@Oldster: coincidentally, I'm currently having a stab at Re-reading House of Leaves, so the "reality" of fictional books/films/etc is something I've been thinking about.

Idk if anyone has done a tally of the works that are quoted / cited in HoL, but it would be an interesting exercise.

#85 ::: Tracie ::: (view all by) ::: December 03, 2018, 03:16 PM:

In John McCutcheon's Christmas in the Trenches:


As soon as they were finished a reverent pause was spent
'God rest ye merry, gentlemen' struck up some lads a from Kent
The next they sang was 'Stille Nacht". "Tis 'Silent Night'" says I
And in two toungues one song filled up that sky-

#86 ::: Joel Polowin ::: (view all by) ::: December 03, 2018, 08:39 PM:

oldster @83: I've pretty much given up on editing Wikipedia except for occasional corrections of spelling or punctuation errors. Such-and-such isn't important enough to rate inclusion, and "well, *I've* never heard of it" seems to trump attempts to give context unless one can provide many documents. Such-and-such a newspaper or journal isn't "significant" enough to count as supporting documentation. Petty cliques stake out their territories, supporting each other against individuals. Linking to supporting sites is discounted as "original research": "your knowing where to find the documentation is the original part".

I have much better ways of spending my time than trying to fight such nonsense.

#87 ::: Xopher Halftongue ::: (view all by) ::: December 03, 2018, 08:50 PM:

oldster 83: Reflecting on the Necronomicon, I wonder whether most fictional books are nonfiction?

In my one, abortive-because-overly-ambitious attempt at a novel, the novel itself appears. The main characters are laughed at for claiming to be themselves, because those people are characters in a novel written three decades earlier. They can't get a copy of it for the first two-thirds of the story, and when they do, the author (me, by then in my late 80s) tells them that he changed the ending to make it more interesting, and can't remember what actually happened (time travel, sort of, is involved).

Joel 86: Ugh. That sound you hear is me abandoning my intention to fix the shallow, narrow, ignorant page on Stratificational Linguistics.

#88 ::: Jacque ::: (view all by) ::: December 04, 2018, 12:20 AM:

Wait, do I hear an echo?

#89 ::: Dave Harmon ::: (view all by) ::: December 04, 2018, 07:39 AM:

Joel Polowin #86: Also, looking in from outside, ISTM their conflict-resolution procedures have become complex and laborious enough to represent a significant barrier against new editors.

#90 ::: Quercus ::: (view all by) ::: December 04, 2018, 12:10 PM:

The Dropkick Murphy's 2004 version of "Tessie" is both a cover of a 1902 song and also about the original 1902 song. Which doesn't exactly fit the requirements from the original post, but is too interesting a variation of a meta-song to leave out. Especially in light of the current MLB champions.


[The 2004 version has the same title and music as the 1902 version, but new lyrics (for the verses) which describe how the 1902 version was used as a fight song by Boston baseball fans]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tessie

#91 ::: Russell Letson ::: (view all by) ::: December 04, 2018, 03:13 PM:

About "Monster Mash": Groping around in very old memories, reinforced by Google--there was a dance called the mashed potato that was popular the same year as "Monster Mash." I recall bunches of dance steps and styles making their way through teen culture back then, starting (at least in my whitebread backwater) with the twist. Most of the dances were accompanied by songs that promoted/celebrated them.

#92 ::: Sarah E. ::: (view all by) ::: December 05, 2018, 11:51 AM:

Xopher Halftongue @ #87:
The main characters are laughed at for claiming to be themselves, because those people are characters in a novel written three decades earlier. They can't get a copy of it for the first two-thirds of the story, and when they do, the author (me, by then in my late 80s) tells them that he changed the ending to make it more interesting, and can't remember what actually happened (time travel, sort of, is involved).

Sort of like Enoch Soames, but seen from a different PoV?

#93 ::: lorax ::: (view all by) ::: December 05, 2018, 01:09 PM:

oldster #83:

May I take this opportunity to ask all of you good people to contribute your widow's mite to Wikipedia?

It is as close to our original hopes for the internet, as Facebook is now a realization of our worst fears.

You can ask, but I'm afraid I won't take you up on that. It has become, as so many places have, a haven for those who are intimately familiar with the peculiarities of the site, such that actual expertise in a field is explicitly devalued as "original research" while having been an editor for many years, or having made many edits, automatically makes one trustworthy.

I have similar issues with Stack Overflow - if you asked basic questions back in 2009, they've given you thousands and thousands of magic internet points over the years, whereas even the most intelligent and experienced person joining today is regarded as a clueless twit because of their low "reputation".

#94 ::: lorax ::: (view all by) ::: December 05, 2018, 01:09 PM:

oldster #83:

May I take this opportunity to ask all of you good people to contribute your widow's mite to Wikipedia?

It is as close to our original hopes for the internet, as Facebook is now a realization of our worst fears.

You can ask, but I'm afraid I won't take you up on that. It has become, as so many places have, a haven for those who are intimately familiar with the peculiarities of the site, such that actual expertise in a field is explicitly devalued as "original research" while having been an editor for many years, or having made many edits, automatically makes one trustworthy.

I have similar issues with Stack Overflow - if you asked basic questions back in 2009, they've given you thousands and thousands of magic internet points over the years, whereas even the most intelligent and experienced person joining today is regarded as a clueless twit because of their low "reputation".

#95 ::: oldster ::: (view all by) ::: December 05, 2018, 01:20 PM:

I am sorry to have raised the topic of Wikipedia; I had not known it would be a divisive one.

I propose that the topic be dropped from this thread, and pursued, if anyone wishes to pursue it, on the nearest open thread.

#96 ::: Xopher Halftongue ::: (view all by) ::: December 05, 2018, 09:28 PM:

Sarah 92: Sort of like Enoch Soames, but seen from a different PoV?

Not really. In my story they're trying to get back to their own universe, and have to fight MIBs and a homicidal AI to do it. Mulder and Scully, the Beatles, and Highlander-style immortals figure prominently.

It's pretty gonzo. At one point they have to meet a contact in a Mexican restaurant called LCD, which stands, not for Liquid Crystal Display, but for Lucia en el Cielo con Diamantes.

#97 ::: Narmitaj ::: (view all by) ::: December 05, 2018, 09:29 PM:

There's "My Song" from The Moody Blues, written by Mike Pinder.

I'm going to sing my song
And sing it all day long
A song that never ends
How can I tell you, all the things inside my head

There's also "The Turkish Song of the Damned" by the Pogues:

Did you keep a watch for the dead man's wind
Did you see the woman with the comb in her hand
Wailing away on the wall on the strand
As you danced to the Turkish song of the damned

There is (as far as I know) no real Turkish song of the damned, apart from this one invented by the Pogues. Apparently the name and indeed idea for the song came from Shane McGowan mishearing someone asking him if he liked “The Turkey Song” by The Damned.

#98 ::: Julie L. ::: (view all by) ::: December 05, 2018, 10:54 PM:

Years ago, I got into a protracted editing tussle with an entrenched Wikipedian about a series which they had never even read/seen, causing them to persistently “correct” multiple names without any understanding of specific usage wrt family names, regional names, even the name of the series itself :b

Though I am vaguely pleased that my drastic restructuring of the “writing instruments” article from waybackwhen has actually stayed in place after all this time. Well, at least last time I checked.

#99 ::: Cassy B. ::: (view all by) ::: December 06, 2018, 08:31 AM:

I didn't think I had anything to add to this thread, and then the oldies station at work played Neil Diamond's "Song Sung Blue". Which I think actually fits both the letter and spirit of the OP, because the song is about someone encouraging everyone to sing their "song sung blue" when they're sad, and obviously referring to individual sad songs probably made up on the spot or at least beloved by the sad person, not the meta work.

#100 ::: Joel Polowin ::: (view all by) ::: December 06, 2018, 06:32 PM:

I suppose that "Hanky Panky" (as in "My baby does the Hanky Panky") counts as much as do the other songs which reference fictional dances.

#101 ::: SunflowerP ::: (view all by) ::: December 06, 2018, 07:48 PM:

Another instance in which the sung-about song isn't fictional (and the title isn't identical, though it does contain the title of the first song) is The Guess Who's 'When the Band Was Singin' (Shakin' All Over)', referring to their breakthrough hit, a cover of 'Shakin' All Over'. (The later song's lyrics also list of a number of other songs in the verses, but that gets us into a whole 'nother structural genre.)

#102 ::: Zvi Gilbert ::: (view all by) ::: December 07, 2018, 11:56 AM:

What song is Mister Tambourine Man playing?

#103 ::: Zvi Gilbert ::: (view all by) ::: December 07, 2018, 12:01 PM:

'Tit-willow' by Gilbert & Sullivan is a self-referential bird-man hybrid:

On a tree by a river a little tom-tit
Sang "Willow, titwillow, titwillow"
And I said to him, "Dicky-bird, why do you sit
Singing 'Willow, titwillow, titwillow'"
"Is it weakness of intellect, birdie?" I cried
"Or a rather tough worm in your little inside"
With a shake of his poor little head, he replied
"Oh, willow, titwillow, titwillow!"

He slapped at his chest, as he sat on that bough
Singing "Willow, titwillow, titwillow"
And a cold perspiration bespangled his brow
Oh, willow, titwillow, titwillow
He sobbed and he sighed and a gurgle he gave*
Then he plunged himself into the billowy wave
And an echo arose from the suicide's grave
"Oh, willow, titwillow, titwillow"

Now I feel just as sure as I'm sure that my name
Isn't Willow, titwillow, titwillow
That 'twas blighted affection that made him exclaim
"Oh, willow, titwillow, titwillow"
And if you remain callous and obdurate, I
Shall perish as he did, and you will know why
Though I probably shall not exclaim as I die
"Oh, willow, titwillow, titwillow"

#104 ::: Paul A. ::: (view all by) ::: December 07, 2018, 05:44 PM:

Zvi Gilbert @ #103:

Furthermore, "Tit-willow" is an example of the subset where the real song contains within itself the entirety of the fictional song.

#105 ::: Don Simpson ::: (view all by) ::: December 09, 2018, 11:34 PM:

Heart of my Heart, Sam's Song, Elmer's Tune.

#106 ::: Don Simpson ::: (view all by) ::: December 09, 2018, 11:42 PM:

This is the song I'm singing, much like any other song,
It has a lot of nice things in it, but it isn't too long;
It has an appeal that's deliberately planned,
But it isn't too grand;
It's a random
Forgettable song.

This is the song I'm singing, it's soothing to the brain,
Nothing in it to jar listeners, or make folks complain;
It's sweet, but it builds to something that's soaring
So it isn't too boring;
It's a random
Forgettable song.

This is the song I'm singing, it's pretty as can be,
Possibly, with not too bad music, an Oscar nominee;
Full of love and hope and gladness, words like that;
Here's what I'm getting at:
It's a random
Forgettable song.

#107 ::: SE Walden ::: (view all by) ::: December 11, 2018, 02:36 AM:

Je N'En Connais Pas Le Fin
(Jeff Buckley)

I used to know a little square
So long ago, when I was small
All summer long it had a fair
Wonderful fair with swings and all
I used to love my little fair
And at the close of every day
I could be found, dancing around
A merry-go round that used to play
Ah, mon amour
A toi toujours
Dans tes grands yeux
Rien que nous deux
All summer long my little fair
Made everyday like a holiday
Night after night it used to play
And people came from so far away
And everyone sang that little tune
All around town you heard it played
Even Pepi from Napoli
He sang to Marie
This serenade
Ah, mon amour
A toi toujours
Dans tes grands yeux
Rien que nous deux

Songwriters: Marguerite Monnot / Raymond Asso

#108 ::: Kyle Reece ::: (view all by) ::: December 11, 2018, 08:27 AM:

“Oh Yeah”- Roxy Music

“When the music is here in my car
There's a band playing on the radio
With a rhythm of rhyming guitars
They playing Oh Yeah on the radio
And so came to be our song
And so on through all summer long”

#109 ::: Tom Whitmore ::: (view all by) ::: December 11, 2018, 08:37 AM:

There's a marvelous song done by Fairport Convention called "Wishfulness Waltz" that may or may not refer to a different song (rather like the ones that started this discussion).

#110 ::: Clifton ::: (view all by) ::: December 11, 2018, 03:33 PM:

Narmitaj @ 97:
'The Turkish Song of the Damned' seems like a perfect example of the original request, all the more so for being based on a misunderstanding. (And it might be my favorite of the ones listed so far.)

#111 ::: Gary Miller ::: (view all by) ::: December 12, 2018, 12:19 AM:

"What Have They Done to My Song Ma" by Melanie Safka

#112 ::: Joel Polowin ::: (view all by) ::: December 12, 2018, 12:20 PM:

AKA "Look What They've Done to My Song, Ma", translated into French as "Ils ont changé ma chanson, Ma", Italian as "Non è più la mia canzone", Czech as "Ze hebben geknoeid aan mijn lied, ma", Dutch as "Ze hebben geknoeid aan mijn lied, ma", Finnish as "Jos kaupan onnea ois", and German as "Wer hat mein Lied so zerstört, Ma?"

#113 ::: Jim Meadows ::: (view all by) ::: December 15, 2018, 12:48 AM:

Zoe Mulford's "The President Sang 'Amazing Grace'", referencing Pres. Obama's eulogy for the victims of the 2015 shootings at Emanuel AME church:

But no words could say what must be said
For all the living and the dead
So on that day and in that place
The President sang Amazing Grace
The President sang Amazing Grace

Welcome to Making Light's comment section. The moderators are Avram Grumer, Teresa & Patrick Nielsen Hayden, and Abi Sutherland. Abi is the moderator most frequently onsite. She's also the kindest. Teresa is the theoretician. Are you feeling lucky?

Comments containing more than seven URLs will be held for approval. If you want to comment on a thread that's been closed, please post to the most recent "Open Thread" discussion.

You can subscribe (via RSS) to this particular comment thread. (If this option is baffling, here's a quick introduction.)

Post a comment.
(Real e-mail addresses and URLs only, please.)

HTML Tags:
<strong>Strong</strong> = Strong
<em>Emphasized</em> = Emphasized
<a href="http://www.url.com">Linked text</a> = Linked text

Spelling reference:
Tolkien. Minuscule. Gandhi. Millennium. Delany. Embarrassment. Publishers Weekly. Occurrence. Asimov. Weird. Connoisseur. Accommodate. Hierarchy. Deity. Etiquette. Pharaoh. Teresa. Its. Macdonald. Nielsen Hayden. It's. Fluorosphere. Barack. More here.















(You must preview before posting.)

Dire legal notice
Making Light copyright 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017 by Patrick & Teresa Nielsen Hayden. All rights reserved.