Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Alexander Lindsay

Male Abt 1387 - 1439  (~ 51 years)


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  • Name Alexander Lindsay  [1
    Born Abt 1387  [2
    Gender Male 
    Died Between 31 Mar 1438 and 8 Sep 1439  [3, 4, 5
    Person ID I27282  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others | Ancestor of TWK
    Last Modified 29 Dec 2021 

    Father David Lindsay,   b. Between 1359 and 1360,   d. Feb 1407, Finhaven Castle, Angus, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 48 years) 
    Mother Elizabeth Stewart 
    Married Bef 1384  [4, 6
    Notes 
    • Their dispensation was dated 22 Feb 1375, they being related in the 4th degree of kindred.
    Family ID F16286  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Marjory 
    Married Bef 1410  [2, 5
    Children 
    +1. David Lindsay,   d. 17 Jan 1446, Finavon Castle, Angus, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified 20 Jun 2020 
    Family ID F16285  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • 2nd Earl of Crawford.

      "[A]s a minor a hostage for the Earl of Douglas 1406-7, called 'dilectus consanguineus' 1407 in a safe-conduct from King Henry IV, knighted at the coronation of James I, 21 May 1424, a hostage in England for the king's ransom 1424-27, ambassador to England January 1430/1, a commissioner of truce 31 Mar 1438." [The Ancestry of Charles II, citation details below]

      "[He] was much less prominent in public life than his father. In part this was the result of two spells in captivity, in 1406–7 as a hostage for the fourth earl of Douglas and in 1424–7 as a hostage for James I. In 1407 Henry IV of England granted him a safe conduct for travel to Amiens, an early indication of a long-standing family devotion to St John the Baptist, whose head was venerated there. He received a safe conduct for travel to England in 1416 and again in 1421, when he was one of the commissioners appointed to negotiate the release of James I from English captivity. In December of the same year he arranged a male entail for the Crawford lands. In 1424 he met James at Durham with hostages for the king's release. Although Crawford is said to have been knighted at James's coronation on 21 May 1424, on 25 March he had taken oath as a hostage for the king, his own ransom set at 1000 merks. During this second period of captivity he was imprisoned in the Tower of London, York, and finally Pontefract. Two years after his release in 1427 he endowed a chaplaincy in the parish church of Dundee with an annual grant of 12 merks. He received another safe conduct in January 1430, to meet English envoys at Hawdenstank, and in January 1431 he was again nominated as an ambassador to England. In 1438 he was appointed a commissioner of the Anglo-Scottish truce. Little else is known of Crawford, but he was said to have been active in the capture of James I's assassins. He and his wife Marjory, whose identity is unrecorded, had five sons and two daughters." [Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, citation details below]

  • Sources 
    1. [S50] Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families by Douglas Richardson. Second edition, 2011.

    2. [S1480] The Ancestry of Charles II, King of England: A Medieval Heritage by Charles M. Hansen and Neil D. Thompson. Saline, Michigan: McNaughton and Gunn, 2012.

    3. [S1480] The Ancestry of Charles II, King of England: A Medieval Heritage by Charles M. Hansen and Neil D. Thompson. Saline, Michigan: McNaughton and Gunn, 2012., latter date only.

    4. [S76] The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press, 2004-ongoing.

    5. [S800] The Scots Peerage, Founded on Wood's Edition of Sir Robert Douglas's Peerage of Scotland, Containing an Historical and Genealogical Account of the Nobility of That Kingdom. Ed. James Balfour Paul. Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1904-1914.

    6. [S800] The Scots Peerage, Founded on Wood's Edition of Sir Robert Douglas's Peerage of Scotland, Containing an Historical and Genealogical Account of the Nobility of That Kingdom. Ed. James Balfour Paul. Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1904-1914., "about 1385".