Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Jean de Brienne

Male - 1296


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Jean de Brienne (son of Jeane de Brienne, King of Jerusalem; Latin Emperor of Constantinople and Bérenguère of Castile-León); died on 8 Jan 1296; was buried in Maubuisson Abbey near Pontoise, near Paris, France.

    Notes:

    Also called Jean d'Acre. Count of Montfort jure uxoris.

    "Grand butler of France, 1258?; guardian and councillor, with his 2nd wife, Marie de Coucy, queen mother of Scotland, of Alexander III of Scotland 1257-1259; ambassador to Spain, 1275; administered Champagne for Blanche d'Artois and her 2nd husband Edmund of Lancaster, 1276-1284." [The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, citation details below.]

    Jean married Jeanne de Châteaudun in 1251. Jeanne (daughter of Geoffroi VI de Châteaudun and Clémence des Roches) died about 1254; was buried in Maubuisson Abbey near Pontoise, near Paris, France. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. Blanche de Brienne

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Jeane de Brienne, King of Jerusalem; Latin Emperor of Constantinople was born between 1169 and 1174 (son of Erard II de Brienne and Agnès); died on 23 Mar 1237 in Constantinople.

    Notes:

    From Wikipedia:

    John of Brienne (c. 1170 - 27 March 1237), also known as John I, was King of Jerusalem from 1210 to 1225 and Latin Emperor of Constantinople from 1229 to 1237. He was the youngest son of Erard II of Brienne, a wealthy nobleman in Champagne. John, originally destined for an ecclesiastical career, became a knight and owned small estates in Champagne around 1200. After the death of his brother, Walter III, he ruled the County of Brienne on behalf of his minor nephew Walter IV (who lived in southern Italy).

    The barons of the Kingdom of Jerusalem proposed that John marry Maria, Queen of Jerusalem. With the consent of Philip II of France and Pope Innocent III, he left France for the Holy Land and married the queen; the royal couple were crowned in 1210. After Maria's death in 1212 John administered the kingdom as regent for their infant daughter, Isabella II; an influential lord, John of Ibelin, attempted to dethrone him. John was a leader of the Fifth Crusade. Although his claim of supreme command of the crusader army was never unanimously acknowledged, his right to rule Damietta (in Egypt) was confirmed shortly after the town fell to the crusaders in 1219. He claimed the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia on behalf of his second wife, Stephanie of Armenia, in 1220. After Stephanie and their infant son died that year, John returned to Egypt. The Fifth Crusade ended in failure (including the recovery of Damietta by the Egyptians) in 1221.

    John was the first king of Jerusalem to visit Europe (Italy, France, England, León, Castile and Germany) to seek assistance for the Holy Land. He gave his daughter in marriage to Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in 1225, and Frederick ended John's rule of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. Although the popes tried to persuade Frederick to restore the kingdom to John, the Jerusalemite barons regarded Frederick as their lawful ruler. John administered papal domains in Tuscany, became the podestà of Perugia and was a commander of Pope Gregory IX's army during Gregory's war against Frederick in 1228 and 1229.

    He was elected emperor in 1229 as the senior co-ruler (with Baldwin II) of the Latin Empire, and was crowned in Constantinople in 1231. John III Vatatzes, Emperor of Nicaea, and Ivan Asen II of Bulgaria occupied the last Latin territories in Thrace and Asia Minor, besieging Constantinople in early 1235. John directed the defence of his capital during the months-long siege, with the besiegers withdrawing only after Geoffrey II of Achaea and united fleets from Italian towns defeated their fleet in 1236. The following year, John died as a Franciscan friar.

    Jeane married Bérenguère of Castile-León in 1223 in Burgos, Castile, Spain. Bérenguère (daughter of Alfonso IX, King of León and Galicia and Berenguela I of Castile, Queen Of Castile & Toledo) was born in 1204; died on 12 Apr 1237 in Constantinople. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Bérenguère of Castile-León was born in 1204 (daughter of Alfonso IX, King of León and Galicia and Berenguela I of Castile, Queen Of Castile & Toledo); died on 12 Apr 1237 in Constantinople.
    Children:
    1. 1. Jean de Brienne died on 8 Jan 1296; was buried in Maubuisson Abbey near Pontoise, near Paris, France.
    2. Louis de Brienne


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Erard II de Brienne (son of Gautier II and Adelais of Baudemont); died in 1191.

    Notes:

    Count of Brienne. He was a French general in the Third Crusade, most notably at the siege of Acre.

    Erard married Agnès. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  Agnès

    Notes:

    "[Jean de Brienne's] mother's name was Agnès, but she may have been a second wife of his father after the death of the first - who was from the Montfaucon family, but not definitely named Agnès. The mother of Jean may have been a daughter of Guillaume III, count of Nevers, Auxerre and Tonnerre by Ida of Sponheim." [Peter Stewart, SGM, 10 June 2020]

    Children:
    1. Gauthier III de Brienne was born about 1165; died in Jun 1205 in Sarno, Campania, Italy; was buried in Church of St. Maria della Foce, Sarno, Campania, Italy.
    2. 2. Jeane de Brienne, King of Jerusalem; Latin Emperor of Constantinople was born between 1169 and 1174; died on 23 Mar 1237 in Constantinople.

  3. 6.  Alfonso IX, King of León and Galicia was born on 15 Aug 1171 in Zamora, León, Spain (son of Fernando II, King of Leon, Galicia, and Extremadura and Urraca of Portugal); died on 24 Sep 1230 in Villanueva de Sarria, Spain; was buried in Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: 1166

    Notes:

    Called "el Barboso," "the Slobberer," supposedly because he was subject to fits of rage during which he foamed at the mouth. Despite this, he is also notable for having founded the University of Salamanca and for convening what was arguably the first parliament in Western Europe that included representatives of the urban bourgeoisie. Our theory is that he was a marooned time-traveler from the future: if you found yourself stuck in twelfth-century Spain, you'd foam at the mouth once in a while too.

    From Wikipedia:

    In spite of the democratic precedent represented by the Cortes and the founding of the University of Salamanca, Alfonso is often chiefly remembered for the difficulties his successive marriages caused between him with Pope Celestine III. He was first married in 1191 to his first cousin, Theresa of Portugal, who bore him two daughters, and a son who died young. The marriage was declared null by the papal legate Cardinal Gregory for consanguinity.

    After Alfonso VIII of Castile was defeated at the Battle of Alarcos, Alfonso IX invaded Castile with the aid of Muslim troops. He was summarily excommunicated by Pope Celestine III. In 1197, Alfonso IX married his first cousin once removed, Berengaria of Castile, to cement peace between León and Castile. For this second act of consanguinity, the king and the kingdom were placed under interdict by representatives of the Pope. In 1198, Pope Innocent III declared Alfonso and Berengaria's marriage invalid, but they stayed together until 1204. The annulment of this marriage by the pope drove the younger Alfonso to again attack his cousin in 1204, but treaties made in 1205, 1207, and 1209 each forced him to concede further territories and rights. The treaty in 1207 is the first existing public document in the Castilian dialect.

    The Pope was, however, compelled to modify his measures by the threat that, if the people could not obtain the services of religion, they would not support the clergy, and that heresy would spread. The king was left under interdict personally, but to that he showed himself indifferent, and he had the support of his clergy. Berengaria left him after the birth of five children, and the king then returned to Theresa, to whose daughters he left his kingdom in his will.

    Alfonso married Berenguela I of Castile, Queen Of Castile & Toledo before 17 Dec 1197 in Valladolid, Castile, Spain. Berenguela (daughter of Alfonso VIII, King of Castile, Toledo, and Extramadura and Eleanor of England) was born in 1171; died on 8 Nov 1244; was buried in Abbey of Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas, Burgos, Castile, Spain. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 7.  Berenguela I of Castile, Queen Of Castile & Toledo was born in 1171 (daughter of Alfonso VIII, King of Castile, Toledo, and Extramadura and Eleanor of England); died on 8 Nov 1244; was buried in Abbey of Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas, Burgos, Castile, Spain.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Abt 1179-1180
    • Alternate birth: Abt 1180
    • Alternate birth: Between Jan 1180 and Jun 1180
    • Alternate birth: Bef Aug 1180, Burgos, Castile, Spain
    • Alternate death: 8 Nov 1246, Las Huelgas, near Burgos, Castile, Spain

    Notes:

    Also called Berengaria.

    "The couple separated due to consanguinity in 1204, after which she returned to her father's dominions, where she became regent for her younger brother, Enrique I, King of Castile. She abdicated the throne of Castile 31 Aug 1217, in favor of her son, Fernando." [Royal Ancestry]

    "Starting in 1198, Pope Innocent III objected to the marriage on the grounds of consanguinity, though the couple stayed together until 1204. They vehemently sought a dispensation in order to stay together, including offering large sums of money. However, the pope denied their request, although they succeeded in having their children considered legitimate. Her marriage dissolved, Berengaria returned to Castile and to her parents in May 1204, where she dedicated herself to the care of her children." [Wikipedia]

    Notes:

    Annulled by Pope Innocent III on grounds of consanguinity.

    Children:
    1. St. Fernando III, King Of Castile, León, Galicia, Toledo, Córdoba, Jaén, and Seville was born between Jun 1201 and Jul 1201 in En route between Salamanca and Zamora; died on 30 May 1252 in Seville, Andalusia, Spain; was buried in Cathedral Santa María, Seville, Andalusia, Spain.
    2. Alfonso was born between 1203 and 1204; died on 6 Jan 1272 in Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain.
    3. 3. Bérenguère of Castile-León was born in 1204; died on 12 Apr 1237 in Constantinople.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Gautier II (son of Erard I and Alix); died before 1161.

    Notes:

    Count of Brienne. Crusader.

    Gautier married Adelais of Baudemont. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  Adelais of Baudemont (daughter of André de Baudement and Agnès of Braine).

    Notes:

    Also called, on some occasions, Hubelina. Peter Stewart's 6 Feb 2011 post to SGM demonstrates that Adelais and Hubelina have to have been the same person, and that contrary to some claims, she was the only known wife of Gautier II.

    Children:
    1. 4. Erard II de Brienne died in 1191.
    2. André de Brienne was born about 1135; died on 4 Oct 1189 in Acre, Palestine.

  3. 12.  Fernando II, King of Leon, Galicia, and Extremadura was born in 1137 (son of Alfonso VII, King of Leon and Castile and Berenguela of Barcelona); died on 22 Jan 1188 in Benavente, Italy; was buried in Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain.

    Fernando married Urraca of Portugal in 1165. Urraca (daughter of Affonso I Henriques, King of Portugal and Mafalda of Savoy) was born about 1150; died on 16 Oct 1188 in Bamba, near Valladolid, Castile, Spain; was buried in Monastery of San Juan Bautista of the Knights of St. John, Bamba, near Valladolid, Castile, Spain. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 13.  Urraca of Portugal was born about 1150 (daughter of Affonso I Henriques, King of Portugal and Mafalda of Savoy); died on 16 Oct 1188 in Bamba, near Valladolid, Castile, Spain; was buried in Monastery of San Juan Bautista of the Knights of St. John, Bamba, near Valladolid, Castile, Spain.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Abt 1151

    Notes:

    "Su última aparición en la documentación medieval fue en 1211 cuando donó a la Catedral de Zamora la villa de Castrotorafe que había recibido como parte de las arras entregadas por rey Fernando en 1165." [Spanish-language Wikipedia]

    Children:
    1. 6. Alfonso IX, King of León and Galicia was born on 15 Aug 1171 in Zamora, León, Spain; died on 24 Sep 1230 in Villanueva de Sarria, Spain; was buried in Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain.

  5. 14.  Alfonso VIII, King of Castile, Toledo, and Extramadura was born on 11 Nov 1155 in Soría, Castile, Spain (son of Sancho III, King of Nájera, Castile, and Toledo and Blanche of Navarre, Queen of Castile); died on 22 Sep 1214; was buried in Abbey of Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas, Burgos, Castile, Spain.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 5 Oct 1214, Gutiérre Muños, Arévalo, Spain
    • Alternate death: 6 Oct 1214, Gutiérre Muños, Arévalo, Spain

    Notes:

    Also Lord of Gascony. "Defeated by the Moorish Almohad invaders in 1195, but defeated a combined army of the kings of Leon and Navarre the same year. Won a great victory over the Moors at Navas de Tolosa, 1212." [The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, which gives the date of his marriage to Eleanor as September 1177, unlike other sources which date it to September 1170.]

    Alfonso married Eleanor of England in Sep 1170 in Burgos, Castile, Spain. Eleanor (daughter of Henry II, King of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen Consort of France; Queen Consort of England) was born in 1161; died on 21 Sep 1214; was buried in Abbey of Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas, Burgos, Castile, Spain. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  6. 15.  Eleanor of England was born in 1161 (daughter of Henry II, King of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen Consort of France; Queen Consort of England); died on 21 Sep 1214; was buried in Abbey of Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas, Burgos, Castile, Spain.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: 13 Oct 1162, Domfront, Normandy, France
    • Alternate death: 25 Oct 1214, Burgos, Castile, Spain

    Notes:

    Also called Leonor.

    "Of all Eleanor of Aquitaine's daughters, her namesake was the only one who was enabled, by political circumstances, to wield the kind of influence her mother had exercised. In her own marriage treaty, and in the first marriage treaty for her daughter Berengaria, Eleanor was given direct control of many lands, towns, and castles throughout the kingdom. She was almost as powerful as Alfonso, who specified in his will in 1204 that she was to rule alongside their son in the event of his death, including taking responsibility for paying his debts and executing his will. It was she who persuaded him to marry their daughter Berengaria to Alfonso IX of León. Troubadours and sages were regularly present in Alfonso VIII's court due to Eleanor's patronage." [Wikipedia]

    Children:
    1. 7. Berenguela I of Castile, Queen Of Castile & Toledo was born in 1171; died on 8 Nov 1244; was buried in Abbey of Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas, Burgos, Castile, Spain.
    2. Urraca of Castile was born between 1186 and 1187; died on 3 Nov 1220 in Coimbra, Portugal.
    3. Blanche of Castile, Queen Consort of France was born before 4 Mar 1188 in Palencia, Castile, Spain; died in 1252 in Melun, Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France; was buried in Maubuisson Abbey near Pontoise, near Paris, France.